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SPORTS
October 7, 1993 | Daily News Wire Services
A caller to the University of Miami's sports information media office yesterday wanted to know if reporters had heard the latest from Tallahassee: Somebody was planning to poison the food served to Miami players this weekend at the team hotel. The caller, who refused to identify himself, said he heard about the plan from Florida State fans in the Tallahassee area Tuesday. UM players and officials laughed off the rumor. Joked UM assistant athletic director Dave Scott, "We're going to put the freshmen at the head of the chow line.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 24, 2005 | By Douglas J. Keating INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
In addition to the usual reminder to turn off cell phones, the admonition not to take pictures and the thanks to the show's corporate sponsor, the person giving the curtain speech at a recent production of The Nerd assured the Delaware Theatre Company audience at least three times that it would laugh at the show. He was right. It didn't laugh as much as it had been led to expect, but thanks to a strong cast, especially the excellent performance in the title role, there is enough humor in this production to justify for many theatergoers this revival of Larry Shue's 1981 comedy.
NEWS
January 15, 1991 | By Ralph Cipriano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ted Mercer was an electrician from Northeast Philadelphia who looked a lot like Gruber, the character Carl Ballantine used to play on the old McHale's Navy TV show. Mr. Mercer's idea of fun was to dress up in a blond wig and a ruffled tutu, go out on the dance floor and do pirouettes that were about as graceful as you'd expect from a 6-foot-4, 220-pound ballerina. During the last 30 years, Mr. Mercer did his routine at variety shows at veterans hospitals, Veterans of Foreign Wars and orphans' homes.
NEWS
March 4, 2001 | By Robert F. O'Neill, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
"Everybody's got a laughing place," Br'er Rabbit said in an Uncle Remus tale. "The trouble is, most folks don't take the time to look for it. " After the death of first his wife, then his daughter, Leonard Sutker looked hard, and what he found was a perfect place - and need - for laughter, right in his own retirement community. At age 96, Sutker is the self-appointed humorist of Martins Run, a life-care facility of about 300 residents off Palmers Mill Road in Marple Township.
NEWS
April 14, 1997 | by Joe Clark, Daily News Staff Writer
Dear Lord, help me to create more laughter than tears, To dispense more happiness than gloom, And to spread more cheer than despair. Never let me grow so dull that I fail to see the wonder in a child's eyes or the twinkle in the face of the aged. - The Clown's Prayer A threatening cloud was hovering over "Ryan's Rainbows. " That's what they call a group of clowns from Archbishop Ryan High School who create laughter, dispense happiness, and spread cheer to children of all ages through the "clown ministry.
NEWS
October 6, 2003 | By Paddy Noyes FOR THE INQUIRER
Sammy, 4, eagerly looks forward to the regular outings that he and the five other children in his group home take part in. At a carnival, he got his face painted. This was followed by a memorable trip to an apple farm, where he ate apples and went on a hayride. A friendly, affectionate child, Sammy likes to hug people and laughs a lot. Playtime is spent going on the swings and slides, assembling cardboard puzzles with someone, being tickled, playing with musical toys, and watching cartoons.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 9, 1993 | By Clifford A. Ridley, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
Should you drive through West Philadelphia these evenings and wonder at the muffled noise emerging from the Annenberg Center, do not be alarmed. It's simply the sound of laugh lines thudding ineffectually onto the stage of the Zellerbach Theatre, where Preston Sturges' Strictly Dishonorable opened on Sunday for a three-week run. This 1929 comedy, hailed by virtually all the now-legendary critics of its day, should be bottled and sold as a cure for nostalgia: If you suspect they don't write comedy the way they used to, see Strictly Dishonorable and you'll come out thinking Neil Simon is Moliere.
NEWS
September 18, 1998 | by Leon Taylor, Daily News Staff Writer
William "Bill" McCarthy, a health-care financial executive who enjoyed listening to '60s music, and planning and taking European vacations, died Wednesday of heart failure. He was 46 and lived in Wynnewood. McCarthy just started as the chief financial officer of Brite Smile Inc., in Philadelphia, a few weeks ago. He served in a similar capacity at Balanced Care Corp. in Mechanicsburg, Pa., and Concord Healthcare in Williamsport, Pa., during the past four years. Prior to that, he spent 18 years as a CPA and partner in Coopers & Lybrand in Philadelphia.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 1993 | By Douglas J. Keating, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
Reckless begins on Christmas Eve with the heroine Rachel babbling on about the joys of the holiday, her favorite, when her husband tells her he has hired a hit man to kill her that very evening. He has had a change of heart, but it's too late to call off the assassin, so Rachel flees out the bedroom window, never to return home. It's a crazy, absurd beginning to a frequently knockabout comedy that follows Rachel over the next 16 years or so through a long series of comic misadventures.
SPORTS
November 13, 1995 | by Ted Silary, Daily News Sports Writer
You finished first and stormed to a perfect record. Your opponent finished fourth and sputtered to a losing record. You are ready to file into your locker room before a first-round playoff game and your opponent's team bus happens to rumble past. If you're smart, you stay quiet. If not . . . "They were laughing at us, and pointing," Bill Collins said. "Not a lot of them. Just a few. But they were laughing. "We didn't respond. We would have gotten in trouble.
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