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NEWS
September 19, 2014 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
THE TITLE "This is Where I Leave You" refers to what Suspension of Disbelief says to your Rational Mind the minute the movie starts. A father dies, his last wish is for his family to gather to mourn him for seven days and so a bunch of kooky siblings (Jason Bateman, Tina Fey, Adam Driver, Corey Stoll) and their kooky mother (Jane Fonda) spend a week in their hometown getting on each other's last nerve. Sure. Tina Fey and Adam Driver are related. And Jane Fonda is their mom. And sure, during the seven days every character has a major life peak - an affair, a breakup, a make-up, a career jolt, brawl in the front yard.
NEWS
September 6, 2014 | By Carrie Rickey, For The Inquirer
Joan Rivers, the transgressive comedian, author, Fashion Police commissioner, filmmaker and QVC pitchwoman, died Thursday. On Aug. 26, the seemingly unstoppable octogenarian was dishing on E!'s Fashion Police about the clothes worn on the red carpet at the Video Music Awards and the Emmy Awards. The next night, she performed her comedy act at a Times Square theater. On Aug. 28, she stopped breathing during outpatient surgery on her vocal cords. Doctors induced a medical coma and put her on life support.
NEWS
September 5, 2014 | By Ellen Gray
CAN WE TALK about Joan Rivers? Because she'd hate it if we didn't. Rivers, 81, who died yesterday at New York's Mount Sinai Hospital a week after going into cardiac arrest during vocal-cord surgery in a doctor's office, wasn't just a fashion critic with an unfiltered mouth, a QVC jewelry line and a penchant for plastic surgery. Oh, she was unapologetically all those things, as well as the author of a dozen books, including this year's Diary of a Mad Diva . But long before Rivers patrolled the red carpet, enforced style rules on E!
NEWS
August 1, 2014 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
FOR AT LEAST a century we've been beaming our pop culture into deep space, which probably explains why we've gotten no official visits from aliens. If there is intelligent life out there, watching "Gilligan's Island" and listening to the Starland Vocal Band, surely they'll skip the Milky Way altogether. At least that would be a reasonable guess. The funny, kicky "Guardians of the Galaxy" offers a different take - that whatever magic resides in an '80s mix-tape could save the universe.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 2014 | By Jim Rutter, For The Inquirer
How does the Kardashians' excluding Bruce Jenner from their product lines relate to the Constitution's commerce clause? Why are lifetime-appointed Supreme Court justices like DJs at a strip club? In what way do Bruce Springsteen concerts resemble the short shrift given to the workingman by Congress? Colin Quinn's Unconstitutiona l has the answers. His smart, hilarious romp through U.S. history, presented by Philadelphia Theatre Company at the Suzanne Roberts Theatre, takes an absurdist approach to the divisive intolerance for differing opinions that separates red states from blue, immigration-reformists from the closed-borders crowd, and gun-control types from NRA partisans.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 7, 2014 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Bob Newhart will be remembered centuries hence as one of the greatest straight men in American comedy. The soft-spoken stand-up comic and actor who has the deadliest deadpan in the biz and the driest of humors was singularly brilliant in his first major sitcom, The Bob Newhart Show , which ran for five seasons on CBS from 1972 to 1978. In a great character choice, Newhart plays a therapist, Dr. Bob Hartley. Consistently calm in the midst of chaos, Bob listens in each episode to the strange and hilarious problems of a slew of series regulars who bare their souls to him. Florida Friebus has gone down in TV history for playing one of Bob's patients, Lillian Bakerman, an elderly woman who spends her therapy sessions knitting.
NEWS
June 3, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON & MORGAN ZALOT, Daily News Staff Writers morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
HE MOVED FREELY in the worlds of business, government, education and journalism, and those who knew him in all those worlds mourned Lewis Katz yesterday. His philanthropic activities were nearly the stuff of legend, including a $25 million gift last year to his alma mater Temple University, which will name its medical school after him. It was just a few weeks ago that Katz spoke at Temple's commencement ceremony. The speech was, according to Temple board of trustees chairman Patrick J. O'Connor, "among the most inspiring ever given.
NEWS
May 16, 2014 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
IN "CHEF," we learn that revenge is a dish best served never. The lesson comes courtesy of a trendy chef named Carl Casper (Jon Favreau, directing himself and some pals) whose hip restaurant has reached a stodgy phase. A scathing review (from Oliver Platt) causes a fuming Carl to roast the critic in person, an unhinged confrontation that goes viral, costing Carl his job. "Chef" then converts to a road movie - Carl takes his neglected son (Emjay Anthony) on the road in a revamped food truck, falling in love again with cooking and with his neglected son. All of this happens at the urging of his gorgeous and helpful ex-wife (Sofia Vergara)
NEWS
May 9, 2014 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
YEARS from now, anthropologists tracking the development of Rogen Man may point to "Neighbors" as the moment he began to walk fully upright. Seth Rogen has been his generation's icon of knuckle-dragging bachelorhood - imparting Falstaffian advice in "The 40 Year Old Virgin," fecklessly dating teens and smoking pot in "Pineapple Express," making tentative steps toward reform and domesticity in "Knocked Up," reverting to Hollywood hedonist in "This...
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