CollectionsLaughter
IN THE NEWS

Laughter

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
November 14, 1998 | By Leonard Pitts Jr
I'm laughing at a guy in a death camp. Dirty, bedraggled little fellow, laboring under inhumane eyes. I'm laughing. And amazed that I am. His name is Guido. He's the central character of a movie called Life Is Beautiful, a European import starring Italian comic Roberto Benigni. Guido is a likable, if mischievous, rascal who suffers misadventures, finds love, makes a life. Then he's hauled off to a concentration camp, along with his small son. Because, you see, it's the early 1940s and Guido is a Jew. Worried more for his son's innocence than his own fate, the desperately inventive Guido shelters the boy with an elaborate ruse.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 28, 2011
"A merry heart doeth good like a medicine. " - Proverbs 17:22 DO THE SLUMPING economy, skyrocketing gas prices and record unemployment have you saying things like, "Hey, pinch me, wake me up, or at least tell me this is all some sick April Fool's joke, huh?" We're all facing so many challenges these days, but one of the best ways to cope and even improve our health and well-being doesn't cost a thing. Just laugh. Skeptical, are you? Well, in recent years plenty of scientific evidence has confirmed that laugher decreases stress, reduces pain and strengthens your immune system, among other wonders.
LIVING
October 7, 1996 | By William R. Macklin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The children of Israel were laughing, and Avner Ziv wanted to know why. It was the start of the Yom Kippur War, 1973, and as elsewhere in Israel, the kibbutz schools were being shelled. As the bombs rained, Ziv, a psychologist specializing in stress and anxiety, was asked to study Israeli schoolchildren and find some way to help ease their tensions. "While we were looking at the data, we discovered something we couldn't understand," says Ziv, 65, a researcher and professor of psychology at Tel Aviv University.
NEWS
December 18, 1997 | By LEONARD PITTS
Tell me if you think this is funny. It happened three years ago. A Nigeria-born woman comes before an American judge, asking that she and her two daughters not be sent back to Africa. The woman is desperate to spare her girls an ordeal she herself suffered as a child. In Nigeria, as in some other nations of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, there is a custom of female circumcision. I'll bet that while you can think of a great many words to describe that practice, funny doesn't make the list.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 1995 | By Douglas J. Keating, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
Neil Simon has never had trouble making an audience laugh, but in the touring production of Laughter on the 23rd Floor that opened last night at the Merriam Theatre you can be absolutely sure there will be laughter in the theater. That's because the actors themselves will be laughing. "It's something you never do in a comedy - having someone say something funny on stage and have the other actors laugh at it," Simon said. "But in this case I specifically told the director that the people on stage should laugh.
NEWS
July 24, 2012 | By Morgan Zalot, Daily News Staff Writer
(Chillin' Wit' is a regular feature of the Daily News spotlighting a name in the news away from the job. Contact Morgan Zalot at 215-854-5928 or zalotm@phillynews.com. Follow her on Twitter @morganzalot and read her blog, PhillyConfidential.com.) Adé Fuqua's wife, Holremin, excitedly grabs his hand and presses it to her round belly. He hasn't yet felt the kicking of the newlyweds' first child, a baby boy they're expecting in December. "I never get to experience this," Fuqua says, as his wife moves his hand around her belly.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 2011
* LAST MAN STANDING. 8 tonight, 6ABC. SOMETIMES MY body betrays me. I'm not oversharing here, I promise. I'm talking about the laughter that bubbled up two or three times while I watched the pilot for Tim Allen's new sitcom, "Last Man Standing," which premieres tonight in two back-to-back episodes on ABC. Two or three laughs might not seem like a lot, but when they're in reaction to something my conscious brain insists isn't funny,...
NEWS
June 30, 2011
Here's the White House Press Office's transcript, unedited: Hyatt at the Bellevue Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 5:25 P.M. EDT THE PRESIDENT: Hello, Philly! (Applause.) Thank you. Thank you, Philadelphia! (Applause.) It is good to be back -- (applause) -- good to be back in the great state of Pennsylvania. (Applause.) Congratulations, Phillies fans. (Applause.) That is quite a rotation. There are a couple of people I want to acknowledge. First of all, you just heard from somebody who I consider just a dear, dear friend.
NEWS
October 21, 2013 | By Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
Did he say, "Get your gun"? Or did he say, "Protect your guns"? In a video posted Thursday by Talking Points Memo, Atlantic County Sheriff Frank Balles, a Republican vying for Democratic State Sen. Jim Whelan's seat in the Second Legislative District, can be heard telling attendees at a meeting of the gun rights group New Jersey Second Amendment Society that "when somebody who's been elected for 30 years, and he comes knocking on your door and...
NEWS
December 6, 1989 | By Lini S. Kadaba, Inquirer Staff Writer
Loretta LaRoche, a self-appointed M.D. - mirth doctor - and self-esteem builder, laughed at the roomful of social workers gathered in the lofty halls of Friends Hospital Friday morning. She kept it up all day long. "People in health care are such martyrs. It's incredible," LaRoche said. She laughed, loud and brash, like a hyena, infecting the entire room with her humor. Maybe you had to be there. For the next several hours, LaRoche, a somewhat pudgy Lily Tomlin, delivered one-liners worthy of any stand-up comic working the night-club circuit.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 13, 2015 | BY JOE CLARK, For the Daily News
IT'S A PICTURE of a group of guys who at one time reported on just about every robbery, rape, murder, major fire and accident fatality in the city. They were the police reporters for the city's three major newspapers. It was taken 54 years ago when they moved from Room 619 in City Hall to the new Police Administration Building (a/k/a "the Roundhouse"). And although the press room was on the Roundhouse's second floor, it was still known as 619. The engraved plaque on the door says so. Ten men are in the picture.
NEWS
June 23, 2014 | By Paul Jablow, For The Inquirer
Geno Merli figures it's about 10 or 15 minutes into the conventional medical school lecture when the cellphones and iPads come out and the texting and Web-surfing start. "They're doing something else while they're listening," says Merli, an internist and codirector of the Vascular Center at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital. It's not that different at medical conventions, he says, which was why the people who run the annual American College of Physicians (ACP) meeting came to Merli and fellow lecturer Howard Weitz seven years ago and said, almost pleadingly, "Be innovative.
NEWS
March 23, 2014 | By Jim Rutter, For The Inquirer
I could easily dismiss Laughter on the 23rd Floor as harmless nostalgia. Neil Simon's 1993 play takes place in 1953, when he and "the finest writing staff in the history of TV" produced the weekly sketches for Sid Caesar's Your Show of Shows . Simon's semiautobiographical piece, now at Bristol Riverside Theatre, disguises or blends the main players: He renames himself Lucas Brickman (Jason Silverman), Caesar becomes Max Prince (David Edwards), and Mel Brooks turns up as Ira Stone (Ben Lloyd)
NEWS
October 21, 2013 | By Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
Did he say, "Get your gun"? Or did he say, "Protect your guns"? In a video posted Thursday by Talking Points Memo, Atlantic County Sheriff Frank Balles, a Republican vying for Democratic State Sen. Jim Whelan's seat in the Second Legislative District, can be heard telling attendees at a meeting of the gun rights group New Jersey Second Amendment Society that "when somebody who's been elected for 30 years, and he comes knocking on your door and...
ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 2013 | By Jim Rutter, For The Inquirer
Of the clown, Nietzsche remarked, "He alone suffers so deeply that he had to invent laughter. " He would have spoken similarly of magicians had he seen the raucous, deeply revelatory Elephant Room , which is inaugurating the FringeArts building on Columbus Avenue. At first glance, Elephant Room plays like a trio of middle-aged, washed-up magic-makers performing in their basement "secret society" in Paterson, N.J. With their long hair, porn-star moustaches, and lounge-lizard attire, and strumming and kicking to '80s power ballads, it would be all too easy to dismiss Dennis Diamond, Louie Magic, and Daryl Hannah (Geoff Sobelle, Steve Cuiffo and Trey Lyford)
NEWS
June 7, 2013 | By Jonathan Tamari and Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Staff Writers
NEW YORK - In a moving ceremony that was also filled with laughter, Sen. Frank R. Lautenberg's family and colleagues recalled him Wednesday as a feisty and determined man whose life story shaped his work - and also described a personal side rarely seen in public. Lautenberg's funeral on the Upper East Side drew 41 senators, six members of Congress, Gov. Christie, and former Govs. Jon S. Corzine, Jim McGreevey, and James J. Florio. Vice President Biden, former Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton, and New Jersey Sen. Robert Menendez delivered eulogies.
NEWS
May 18, 2013 | By David Hiltbrand and John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writers
Thursday night saw both the season finale of Fox's American Idol and the final episode of the long-running NBC comedy The Office. One was sedate; the other was a tearjerker. Candice Glover was crowned the 12th winner of Idol . The 23-year-old from St. Helena Island, S.C., may have cinched the win with her final competitive performance, a stirring reprise of Ben E. King's "I (Who Have Nothing). " Glover's win over Texas country singer Kree Harrison was one of the most subdued in the history of the Fox series.
FOOD
May 9, 2013 | By Jane Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
I can only imagine what happened when my father died unexpectedly of a heart attack just after midnight. We lived on a narrow street of two-story twins, and the ambulance lights must have spun red through the bedrooms that night. The uncharacteristic hubbub on our quiet block surely brought neighbors to their windows, if not their porches. I can only imagine, because I wasn't there. At the time, I was a sophomore at Temple University. After spending most of the day and evening at the Temple News, putting out our student daily, I had just returned to my dorm room when the call came.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 2013 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
If notes on staves were New Year's greetings, the Philadelphia Orchestra would have sailed a sheaf of good wishes out into Verizon Hall Monday night. At what he told a sold-out crowd was "the biggest party in town," Yannick Nézet-Séguin led a program that, Janus-like, glanced back at a year of "great moments and maybe not-so-great moments," but looked forward, too. Everyone knew what he meant. Never uttered was the word bankruptcy , but by forming a first half of the program with Haydn's "Farewell" Symphony and music from Strauss' Der Rosenkavalier , the orchestra's music director put sound to his aspirations, and, it's hoped, the city's as well.
NEWS
July 24, 2012 | By Morgan Zalot, Daily News Staff Writer
(Chillin' Wit' is a regular feature of the Daily News spotlighting a name in the news away from the job. Contact Morgan Zalot at 215-854-5928 or zalotm@phillynews.com. Follow her on Twitter @morganzalot and read her blog, PhillyConfidential.com.) Adé Fuqua's wife, Holremin, excitedly grabs his hand and presses it to her round belly. He hasn't yet felt the kicking of the newlyweds' first child, a baby boy they're expecting in December. "I never get to experience this," Fuqua says, as his wife moves his hand around her belly.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|