FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
February 4, 1993 | by Dave Racher, Daily News Staff Writer
The 16-year-old Southwest Philadelphia boy apparently wanted to impress his father with his toughness when he shot and killed a man who had been in a dispute with his father last month, the prosecutor said. Instead, the boy, Michael Sudler, shocked his father by shooting James Joyner, 46, to death inside a crowded laundromat at 55th Street and Chester Avenue, as his father watched, said Assistant District Attorney Edward Cameron. Yesterday, Municipal Judge Morton Krase ordered Sudler, of 56th Street near Beaumont, to stand trial on murder and weapons charges in the Jan. 24 slaying.
NEWS
June 30, 2006 | By Alan J. Heavens INQUIRER REAL ESTATE WRITER
You have to hand it to the manufacturers of washers and dryers. They've succeeded in making laundry, a humdrum household chore, seem like something family members are fighting for the chance to do. Now that's marketing! Judging by the offerings at this year's Kitchen and Bath Industry Show, the amenities of the laundry room have become as important as the appliances themselves. "The trend is toward treating a laundry room as if it were a suite," says Audrey Reed-Granger, a spokeswoman for Whirlpool Corp.
LIVING
March 2, 2007 | By Lynn Rosen FOR THE INQUIRER
Doing the laundry seems easy enough: open washer, insert clothes, add water and soap. But it turns out there's a right way and a wrong way to do the wash - and most of us are probably doing it wrong. Advances in the technology of laundry - everything from the fabrics we wear to the detergents we select to the washers and dryers we use - has rendered a lot of the advice our mothers gave us obsolete. In fact, says Cheryl Mendelson, author of Laundry: The Home Comforts Book of Caring for Clothes and Linens, people seem to know very little about the process nowadays.
NEWS
March 4, 1990 | By Marc Kaufman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Thwap goes the shirt, dripping wet and sudsy, as it is pounded down on the washing stone. Thwap, thwap go the pants and saris as they are pummeled in the water nearby. All around there are washers - hundreds and hundreds of wiry men and women, knee-deep in murky water, pounding clothing clean as it has been pounded in India for countless generations. Six thousand of them come here each day, toiling in Bombay's central municipal washing place, known as the Mahalakshmi Dhobi Ghat.
NEWS
April 22, 1998 | by April Adamson, Daily News Staff Writer
When officers Robert Walls and Joseph Domico saw a foot sticking out of a pile of dirty laundry, they knew they had their man. With a little detective work and a lot of legwork, Walls and Domico managed to track down two alleged killers wanted in the death of an Old City lawyer last week. "I saw a foot with an ankle attached," said Walls. "They were hiding in a closet under a pile of clothes. " Yesterday, both cops talked about the daring arrests, made after two anonymous tips from neighborhood informants led them to the two thugs early Saturday morning and ended a seven-day, citywide dragnet.
TRAVEL
February 24, 2013 | By Ellen Sue Spicer-Jacobson, For The Inquirer
Laundry looms large in my life. Ever since I was a girl, I've been fascinated with clothes flapping in the wind or basking in the sun. It started in my childhood with my mother's obsession with cleanliness. There were five children and three adults in our small house, so doing laundry was a major chore. Mounds of clothes lay on the basement floor, waiting for their turn in the semi-automatic washing machine, circa 1950. After the clothes - separated into lights and darks, of course - swish-swashed around in the "tank," my mom would hand-feed the wet garments through a wringer, cranking the handle.
NEWS
February 18, 1988 | By Gloria A. Hoffner, Special to The Inquirer
Although the days when fresh milk and bread were delivered right to the door every morning have passed, Bill Willis has an idea for a home-delivery service he thinks will be popular in the Swarthmore area. He plans to deliver freshly washed laundry to his customers' doors. Willis, a Wallingford resident since 1970, owns three stores on Park Avenue in Swarthmore. When the video store renting one of the stores from him announced plans to move, Willis decided to open a laundry service there.
NEWS
November 29, 1996 | By Alfred Lubrano, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
This was not how N. Barba figured she'd spend her Thanksgiving. Before meeting friends for holiday brunch, Barba decided to do a couple of loads of laundry in the basement of her West Philadelphia apartment house. She laid a quarter into a flat, three-hole coin slot in the dryer, then quickly remembered that the machine did not work. So she poked the ring finger of her left hand into the bottom of the coin slot to retrieve the quarter. But the laundry gods were not kind.
NEWS
July 13, 2003 | By Michael Walsh FOR THE INQUIRER
If home laundry centers were designed by working mothers, rather than male architects, builders and contractors, you can be sure there would be far fewer washers and dryers in basements, garages and mudrooms. Putting the laundry equipment in a basement makes about as much sense as putting the dishwasher down there. Imagine routinely lugging dirty dishes and pots and pans up and down a flight of stairs. But if that thought is ludicrous for dishes, why is it all right for blue jeans, bath towels and bedding?
NEWS
August 31, 1988 | By KATHY SHEEHAN, Daily News Staff Writer
Someone in northwest Philadelphia has gotten himself into a load of hot water with apartment dwellers, apartment building owners and police. All for a mere fistful of quarters for each time he's knocked over a Maytag or a Whirlpool. The burglaries of washing machines and dryers in apartment buildings in the Mount Airy-Germantown area don't top the Police Department's laundry list of crimes, but they have caused the victims considerable inconvenience and expense. The thefts started with the small "vaults" of quarters on the laundry machines.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 10, 2016
A Sicklerville man was sentenced to 15 months in prison Thursday for evading taxes by failing to report wages paid to undocumented immigrants who worked at his dry cleaning business, authorities said. Phillip Hui, 38, had pleaded guilty in federal court in Camden to conspiracy to obstruct and impede the IRS and harboring illegal aliens. By not reporting the wages he paid to 27 of the immigrants in 2012 and 2013 at his Voorhees Township business, New Eastern Cleaners, Hui avoided paying nearly $98,000 in employment taxes, authorities said.
NEWS
August 14, 2016 | By Carolyn Hax, Advice Columnist
Question: I could use some perspective here. My husband and I recently had a baby. After three months of maternity leave, I went back to work full time for about a month but had to drop down to part time because I was exhausted with the kiddo not sleeping well. Fast-forward through a layoff, finding a new job, and starting back full time: I'm happy with my new job, but still struggling to keep the household running smoothly, getting dinner ready, cleaning, etc. The problem is that when I ask for help with this stuff, I get the look: the one that says if I just quit my job, I would have time to take care of all this.
NEWS
July 10, 2016
The Alaskan Laundry By Brendan Jones Mariner Books. 400 pp. $14.95 Reviewed by Paul Davis So, what's a nice, South Philly Italian girl doing in Alaska? Tara Marconi leaves her boyfriend, family, and job in the family bakery to venture to Alaska. She is 18, independent, angry, and tough, a Golden Gloves boxer. She decides to go to Alaska after her strict Sicilian American father kicks her out of the house. Father and daughter have issues relating to her mother's recent death.
NEWS
June 25, 2016 | By Emma Platoff, Staff Writer
The Bellmawr Borough Council voted Thursday to renew the liquor license of Johnnies Liquors, the West Browning Road store implicated, along with a coin laundry across the street, in a May 26 drug bust that targeted two trafficking networks. "So we don't end up in a lawsuit costing us thousands of dollars, reluctantly, yes," Councilman James D'Angelo said when asked for his vote. The decision disappointed the protesters who have sought for weeks to shut down the businesses. The small group of residents has regularly stood outside the store and sometimes the laundry in an effort to deter patrons.
REAL_ESTATE
May 2, 2016 | By Diane M. Fiske, For The Inquirer
The 100-year-old Lenox building in Washington Square West is traditional, to say the least. Stately, you might say. You might also think the home of two young law professors there would be a bit stodgy. You'd need to think again. Step out onto the appropriate floor, walk down a floral-wallpapered hall and into Andrea Monroe and Craig Green's condominium. Your second impression proves the true one: Theirs is a contemporary take on design, with furnishings that are modern, newly configured spaces that have been updated to suit the couple's needs, and some walls painted a soft, tasteful orange.
NEWS
April 13, 2016 | By Walter F. Naedele, Staff Writer
Edward J.J. Dennery already had a leg up when he volunteered to become a World War II Navy pilot. His military record states that when he volunteered for the Navy in August 1943, three months before turning 19, he already had "flight training. " It was more adventurous than that. "When he was approximately 15 years old," son John said, Mr. Dennery happened to be working on the Vineland, N.J., farm of a relative when a barnstorming pilot landed "on a small grass field. " There and on other South Jersey fields, the barnstormer would take up the willing and the paying in his two-seater.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 14, 2015 | By Toby Zinman, For The Inquirer
The subtitle of Underneath the Lintel , now at the Lantern Theater, describes the play: An Impressive Presentation of Lovely Evidences . The evidences, "scraps" that fill a suitcase, are clues, perhaps proofs, of a mystery a librarian dedicates his life to solving. And they are indeed impressively presented by Peter DeLaurier in this entrancing solo show. Glen Berger's play at first seems merely a quaint story. One day an overdue book, a Baedeker's travel guide, is returned to a library in Holland.
NEWS
August 30, 2015 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
CAPE MAY, N.J. - The feet are over the railing, the rocking chair tucked nicely into a corner. The book was taken serendipitously off a shelf, and, not for nothing, the husband was left on a different porch. None of it was deliberated, really, but come to think of it, Sarah "Sally" Gibson, 69, would have to acknowledge she did not take her Cape May porch routines lightly. "I tried all of them," said Gibson, a social worker from North Jersey. "They have three. The air is a little better on the side one, but not the shade.
NEWS
July 28, 2015 | By Melanie Burney, Inquirer Staff Writer
When you look at handiwork crafted by artist Anne Shelton, it will change how you view puffs of fuzzy fluff and fibers scooped from dryer lint traps. Shelton, a retired public school art teacher, has perfected transforming puffs of lint generated from laundry in the dryer into beautiful works of art. An oil and watercolor painter, Shelton, 77, of Glassboro, uses patches carefully sorted from piles of lint - mostly donated by friends - to create what she calls "lintscapes. " "It was a gift from God," Shelton said.
BUSINESS
April 24, 2015 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Staff Writer
  Wash Cycle Laundry, the Philadelphia-based pedal-powered laundry delivery service, has added another territory to its coverage area: George Washington University. Through an agreement with janitorial services provider Aramark, Wash Cycle Laundry will launder the university's reusable cleaning linens. The job will result in the employment of three full-time laundry staff and two full-time cyclists, doubling Wash Cycle Laundry's current staff in Washington, the company said.
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