FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
April 25, 1997 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
"Volcano" is full of surprises, the biggest being that there is no volcano in it. At least not a volcano as we've come to know them - a big mountain with a hole at the top through which magma spews forth from time to time. The so-called volcano in "Volcano" is just a stream of molten rock in downtown Los Angeles that sneaks through an earthquake fissure in MacArthur Park (someone left a cake out in the lava) and races down Wilshire Boulevard, destroying cars and department stores.
NEWS
February 21, 2014 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
AS SOMEONE who's spent the last week frantically putting pots underneath leaks dripping from my flat roof, I'm at a loss to explain the behavior of people in "Pompeii. " As they go about their normal, 79 AD business of wearing togas and peeling grapes and complaining about Roman rule, the earth will suddenly tremble, and tiles will fall from the ceiling. There is a pause, a few casual, "probably nothing" looks upward, then it's back to business. Really? No one's the least bit bothered by these events and their possible relationship to the nearby volcano?
NEWS
July 15, 2011
The bus ride from Philadelphia to New York takes approximately 7,200 seconds. I know because I have felt every single one of those seconds slowly tick away in the East Coast mass-transit purgatory known as the Megabus. The Megabus combines the best and worst of modern transportation. It's cheap yet unreliable. It features technological perks like WiFi and air-conditioning, but ignores basic human rights like legroom and personal space. For those whose lives have been stretched along the Eastern Seaboard by the pull of career, family, and academia, the Megabus is an unfortunate mainstay, a masochistic means of getting from point A to point B. The first thing you should know about the Megabus is that it will be late.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 1997 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Volcano marks Hollywood's second successful attempt this year to make a molehill out of a mountain. And it's the first film to seek to fashion a heart-wrenching moment out of the survival of a pot-bellied pig. The same pig, bloodied but unbowed, must be responsible for the Bad Dialogue Hall of Fame line near the beginning of this eruption of popcorn pyrotechnics and nonstop idiocy: "Look at those rats! They're cooked!" No human screenwriter could possibly have penned it. Los Angeles is, of course, notorious for weird restaurants, and some adventurous gourmet may think this outburst promises a rather literal way of cooking ratatouille.
NEWS
December 7, 2002 | By Ken Dilanian INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Mount Etna is awake again, spewing molten rock toward the towns below. By day, Europe's most active volcano dominates the Sicilian landscape, belching black ash that falls like snow, stinging unprotected eyes, and forcing closure of the local airport. By night, all that is visible is the bright orange pillar of lava, a giant candle flame against the sky. Last weekend, halfway up the 10,990-foot peak, past the tourist lodges and the police barricade, firefighters, scientists and curious hikers marveled at the churning, unforgiving river of lava as it swallowed trees and plant life on its way down the mountain.
NEWS
January 13, 2013
Amnesty urged for separatists BILBAO, Spain - Tens of thousands of Basque separatist sympathizers marched in downtown Bilbao on Saturday, calling for amnesty that would allow ETA prisoners to serve out the remainder of their sentences in the northern Spanish region rather than in jails farther afield. Spain has for more than two decades dispersed ETA prisoners under an amendment to the country's 1975 antiterrorism law. One of the purposes of the law was to stop convicted militants from communicating easily among themselves to plan subversive strategies.
NEWS
February 15, 1987 | By Mike Shoup, Inquirer Travel Editor
For seven months now, Kilauea has been spewing and pumping and oozing a continuous flow of lava from its vast reservoir of magma deep within the Big Island's core. Geologists and volcanologists have come to study the famous volcano and marvel at its eruptions. Visitors from the world over are awed - and humbled - by it. And residents in potential lava paths - often the poor and uninsured - learn to live with the constant threat to their homes. Kilauea (pronounced Kill-a-WAY-ah)
NEWS
October 25, 1987 | By Robert Hollis, Special to The Inquirer
As the hissing flow of orange and gray molten rock crawls toward their homes, fewer than a dozen families remain to watch and wonder what Madam Pele, the Hawaiian goddess of volcanoes, has in store for them. The Royal Gardens subdivision, which once promised paradise for a pittance, is nearly a ghost town today. Early this month, a stream of fresh molten rock crossed a temporary gravel road, cutting the last link between the outside world and the 1,800-acre rural development perched at the foot of Kilauea volcano's lava-scarred flank.
NEWS
December 16, 1986 | By Robert Hollis, Special to The Inquirer
Kaipo and Mazie Roberts' quiet lifestyle of raising orchids on the Puna coast of Hawaii's biggest island ended before dawn one morning last week in a fiery rush of 1,800-degree lava. As police and firefighters stood by helplessly, the Roberts' home - which they had repainted less than two weeks earlier - turned into a torch shortly after 5 a.m., when a finger of molten rock from Kilauea volcano touched the modest wood-frame structure. The Kalapana area is among the most remote on the island.
NEWS
January 3, 2016 | By Tom Avril, Staff Writer
Feodor Pitcairn had been to Iceland seven times with his trusty Hasselblad cameras, capturing a wild landscape of glaciers, steaming geothermal gases, and vivid green mosses. But what he really wanted was an active volcano. Pitcairn, of Bryn Athyn, had just about given up when he got the call in late August 2014. Within days he was leaning out the side of a helicopter, orange lava spurting below. Images from that trip and the others are featured in an exhibit at the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History in Washington through April 2017.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 3, 2016 | By Tom Avril, Staff Writer
Feodor Pitcairn had been to Iceland seven times with his trusty Hasselblad cameras, capturing a wild landscape of glaciers, steaming geothermal gases, and vivid green mosses. But what he really wanted was an active volcano. Pitcairn, of Bryn Athyn, had just about given up when he got the call in late August 2014. Within days he was leaning out the side of a helicopter, orange lava spurting below. Images from that trip and the others are featured in an exhibit at the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History in Washington through April 2017.
NEWS
December 22, 2015 | BY ALEX WIGGLESWORTH & VALERIE RUSS, Staff Writers
THE THREE young women were screaming from inside the mangled Camaro, but the flames were too intense. Nobody was getting them out until the fire was extinguished. Yesterday afternoon, utility workers and a hazmat crew were still on the scene of a horrific early-morning wreck in Holmesburg that set off a chain reaction of explosions, coated the road with pesticides and left the three women dead. The black Chevrolet Camaro was speeding on Torresdale Avenue near Rhawn Street around 2:45 a.m. when its driver lost control and smashed into a parked tractor-trailer, according to the preliminary police investigation.
NEWS
February 21, 2014 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
AS SOMEONE who's spent the last week frantically putting pots underneath leaks dripping from my flat roof, I'm at a loss to explain the behavior of people in "Pompeii. " As they go about their normal, 79 AD business of wearing togas and peeling grapes and complaining about Roman rule, the earth will suddenly tremble, and tiles will fall from the ceiling. There is a pause, a few casual, "probably nothing" looks upward, then it's back to business. Really? No one's the least bit bothered by these events and their possible relationship to the nearby volcano?
NEWS
January 13, 2013
Amnesty urged for separatists BILBAO, Spain - Tens of thousands of Basque separatist sympathizers marched in downtown Bilbao on Saturday, calling for amnesty that would allow ETA prisoners to serve out the remainder of their sentences in the northern Spanish region rather than in jails farther afield. Spain has for more than two decades dispersed ETA prisoners under an amendment to the country's 1975 antiterrorism law. One of the purposes of the law was to stop convicted militants from communicating easily among themselves to plan subversive strategies.
NEWS
July 15, 2011
The bus ride from Philadelphia to New York takes approximately 7,200 seconds. I know because I have felt every single one of those seconds slowly tick away in the East Coast mass-transit purgatory known as the Megabus. The Megabus combines the best and worst of modern transportation. It's cheap yet unreliable. It features technological perks like WiFi and air-conditioning, but ignores basic human rights like legroom and personal space. For those whose lives have been stretched along the Eastern Seaboard by the pull of career, family, and academia, the Megabus is an unfortunate mainstay, a masochistic means of getting from point A to point B. The first thing you should know about the Megabus is that it will be late.
TRAVEL
July 3, 2011 | By Karen Strawhacker, For The Inquirer
When my yoga studio in Skippack offered a yoga retreat to Hawaii, my first reaction was: Do it ! Then came the argument with myself: What about obligations to family and work, and could I do all that yoga - I'm 54 years old? Ah, the monkey mind at work - have I learned nothing in six years of practicing yoga? So off I went. Kalani Oceanside Retreat is on the eastern side of the island of Hawaii in Pahoa. It is nestled in lush greenery on a coastal road between lava fields and the Pacific Ocean.
TRAVEL
May 15, 2011 | By William Ecenbarger, For The Inquirer
ARENAL VOLCANO, Costa Rica - I'm sitting in the middle of a rain forest, mesmerized by the sight of a volcano erupting. It begins with a rumble, like thunder. A thin column of ash spews from the tip of the cone. Lava and freshly baked boulders slide down the steep slopes. My wife and I marvel at the spectacle - and at the fact that just 11 hours earlier, we were eating breakfast in Hershey, Pa. Costa Rica, between the Pacific Ocean and Caribbean Sea and slightly smaller than West Virginia, was the perfect fit - a five-hour plane ride to a vibrant land of beaches, jungles, friendly people, volcanoes, and flora and fauna so numerous that thousands of species have yet to be named.
FOOD
March 19, 2009
Take Three: Japanese The restaurant gods haven't always been kind to the occupants of this handsome-but-oddly situated space in the Academy House, which has seen a string of short-lived ventures reaching back to its one long-ago hit as Marabella's. New owner Kenny Hong, three months into the space's third incarnation, as a Japanese restaurant, is hoping his Sakeya is the third-time charm. He's off to a promising start with fun maki fantasies like the deep-fried Volcanic Mountain roll ($10)
NEWS
December 28, 2008 | By Deborah Large Fox FOR THE INQUIRER
"Winter Madness," proclaimed the Internet ad. "Look at this offer," I said to my husband. "We can fly to Iceland and stay four nights for less than we would pay for a weekend in New York City. " "Book it," Doug said. So I did. Three weeks later, we were on our way to a totally unfamiliar country. I knew that the capital city, Reykjavik, had an all-night bar scene, but we rarely stay up through the news at 11. I was more than a little uncomfortable "winging it" in a cold, rocky land where the names of the towns contained strange symbols and at least six syllables.
NEWS
November 16, 2008 | By Barbara Shoemaker Zamochnick FOR THE INQUIRER
When our cabdriver, Peppino, met me and my husband at the Naples airport, it was easy to guess that he was from Pompeii, because his craggy old face looked as if it was carved out of lava rock. Peppino took great pride in his hometown and acted as though the eruption of 79 A.D. had happened yesterday. "Look, you look. Lava, look," he said as we drove past lava formations. Early on, Peppino commanded my husband to sit in the front seat and me in back. That's how we drove everywhere.
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