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Law Clerk

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NEWS
February 9, 1991 | By Dave Racher, Daily News Staff Writer
Anthony Dixon, 33, a clerk in the city's law department, walked into the Center City bank last May 14 to cash in a certificate of deposit. He walked out in handcuffs after being mistakenly identified as the man who had robbed the bank a week earlier, said defense lawyer Vincent J. Ziccardi yesterday. Assistant District Attorney Wilfred Kushto got Common Pleas Judge Thomas D. Watkins to drop charges against Dixon, of West Philadelphia, after an investigation cleared him of robbing The Bank of Old York Road, 15th and Locust streets.
NEWS
June 12, 1990 | By Jim Nicholson, Daily News Staff Writer
Charles P. "Chick" McLaughlin, a chief law clerk for the Pennsylvania Supreme Court who decided to become a lawyer at an age when most people are planning retirement, died Sunday. He was 58 and lived in the city's Chestnut Hill section. McLaughlin had been with the Philadelphia School District for 23 years when he decided to become a lawyer at the age of 50. At the time of his death, he was chief law clerk for Justice James T. McDermott. Raised in Grays Ferry, he began his career with the School District in 1959 as a Spanish teacher.
NEWS
January 3, 1998 | By Bill Price, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Dawn T. Furgele Goggins, 41, an attorney and judicial law clerk in Delaware County, died of cancer Tuesday at her home in Wallingford. A 1986 graduate of Widener University Law School, Mrs. Goggins had worked as a law clerk for Superior Court President Judge Stephen J. McEwen Jr. in Media for the last two years. She had been a law clerk in Philadelphia for Superior Court Judges John T.J. Kelly Jr. and D. Donald Jamieson and had worked for the Delaware State Attorney General's Office from 1986 to 1988.
NEWS
August 17, 1994 | By Stacey Burling, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Edward John Puhl, 96, a retired law clerk in Philadelphia Orphans Court, died Saturday at his home in Meadowood at Worcester. He had lived in Mount Airy for 54 years before moving to the Meadowood retirement community six years ago. Mr. Puhl worked as a clerk and stenographer for the Department of Public Safety from 1918 to 1922, when he became a law clerk in Orphans Court. On Nov. 16, 1962, he was honored for his 40 years with the court. The six judges of the court presented him with a certificate that read in part: "In recognition of his earnest devotion to duty, his exemplary loyalty, his compendious knowledge of the practice, procedure and substantive law in this Court, his careful and patient attention to detail, his courteous and painstaking assistance to bench and bar alike, and his warm relationship with his fellow associates in this Court, the Court hereby adopts this minute of appreciation and commendation.
NEWS
August 23, 1994 | By Stephanie Grace, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A former Burlington County law clerk charged with posing as a lawyer will face trial in neighboring Camden County instead of Burlington County, the state's chief justice has ruled. Bonnie Jenkins, 38, of Burlington, was charged with theft by deception by a Burlington County grand jury after two attorneys who hired her after her clerkship discovered that she had dropped out of Widener University School of Law during her third and final year and had not taken the bar exam. Chief Justice Robert N. Wilentz agreed Thursday to move the case to Camden County on the recommendation of Burlington County's top judge, Assignment Judge Harold B. Wells 3d, who said that Jenkins' history as a "courthouse insider" could create an "appearance of impropriety" if she were to be tried in Burlington County.
NEWS
August 11, 1994 | By Emilie Lounsberry, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER Inquirer staff writer Russell E. Eshleman Jr. contributed to this article
Two former law clerks for Rolf Larsen raised questions yesterday about his participation in a 1988 zoning case, and one of them also expressed concern about a "secretive" system in which certain cases were monitored in Larsen's chambers. After former law clerk Michael J. Lydon gave some of the most pointed testimony so far in the impeachment trial of the former state Supreme Court justice, Larsen's attorney tried to attack Lydon's credibility by asking if he had had a sexual relationship with another key witness against Larsen.
NEWS
July 13, 1993 | By William H. Sokolic, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT Inquirer Staff Writer Linda Loyd contributed to this article
The son of Philadelphia Common Pleas Court President Judge Edward Blake drowned early Sunday morning in the bay near the Avalon house in Cape May County that he shared with friends. The body of Edward J. Blake Jr., a law clerk in Philadelphia Municipal Court and a bail commissioner with the city Police Department, was discovered face down in the water behind a row of houses on the 2800 block of Ocean Drive. Emily Matt, of Ocean Drive, said she heard the victim and others swimming in the bay about 2:30 a.m. Sunday when she went to bed. Blake was last seen about 4:45 a.m. sitting on a dock at his house, smoking a cigarette, Avalon police said.
NEWS
December 23, 1989 | By Ron Avery, Daily News Staff Writer
It was just a small package, but it fit the profile: The recipient was the law clerk of a federal judge. The package came in plain, brown paper wrapping. It was sent from the deep South - Georgia. The law clerk knew no one in Georgia. And the law clerk's name was misspelled. Federal official and civil rights activities had been alerted to look for just such suspicious packages after parcel bombs killed a federal judge and a lawyer in the South in recent days and injured a county judge in western Maryland yesterday.
NEWS
March 29, 1989 | SAM PSORAS/ DAILY NEWS
Common Pleas Judge Nicholas D'Allessandro (right) took a spin in the Philadelphia Zoo's monorail this morning in preparation for a ruling on the ride's safety. The Zoo has closed the ride because it wants Zoo Safari Monorail Corp., to enclose the cars. With D'Allessandro are Zoo Safari attorney Charles Golden (facing away) and law clerk Joe Troillo.
NEWS
February 3, 1987 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / MICHAEL VIOLA
RELAXING AMID THE THAW, James McHugh of Philadelphia has his coat open as he reads during his lunch break. McHugh, a law clerk to U.S. District Judge James McGirr Kelly, was at still-snow-covered Independence Mall early yesterday afternoon as the temperature was climbing to the day's high of 47. Temperatures in the mid- to upper 40s are forecast for today.
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NEWS
November 25, 2015
A story Sunday about the 2017 New Jersey gubernatorial race gave an incorrect location of the residence of potential candidate Phil Murphy. He lives in Monmouth County. A story Friday about a court appeal by former District Judge Rita Arnold wrongly identified Nicholas D. Ressetar. He is a law clerk for Costopoulos, Foster & Fields, the law firm representing Arnold. In a story Sunday about Amazon trees, the Associated Press erroneously reported how much area the forest has been losing.
NEWS
November 3, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Howard Paul Kester, 85, of Newtown, a former Bucks County Court administrator and a longtime Quaker, died Saturday, Oct. 10, of congestive heart failure at Pennswood Village. Born in Abington, he lived his entire life in Newtown, where he was a respected member of Newtown Monthly Meeting, part of the Religious Society of Friends. He graduated from George School and in 1951 earned a bachelor's degree in political science from Earlham College in Richmond, Ind. Mr. Kester served three years in the Army before returning to school to earn a degree from Temple University School of Law in 1959.
NEWS
August 4, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
John Paul Knox, 87, formerly of Oreland, a lawyer in Montgomery County for many years, died Tuesday, July 21, of cancer at Westminster Canterbury of the Blue Ridge, a retirement community in Charlottesville, Va. Mr. Knox and his wife, Eleanor, had moved to Westminster Canterbury in 2006. The son of Paul Waddell Knox and Florence Welch Knox, Mr. Knox grew up in Chestnut Hill and graduated in January 1946 from Central High School. He began early studies at Yale University in the fall of 1945.
BUSINESS
March 21, 2015 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
More than most, Ted Ruger understands legal complexity. And a good thing, too. The former Supreme Court law clerk is set to take over as dean of the University of Pennsylvania law school July 1. Penn, along with a handful of other elite U.S. law schools, brands itself as a training ground for top students who learn to grapple with the most difficult legal problems. That's why so many of the highest-paying law firms want to hire them, even in a job market that still is struggling.
NEWS
March 6, 2015 | By Robert I. Field, For The Inquirer
WASHINGTON - The fate of Obamacare hung in the balance Wednesday as the Supreme Court heard arguments on whether the Affordable Care Act could continue offering subsidies to help people buy insurance in states such as Pennsylvania and New Jersey. The 80-minute session - 20 minutes longer than expected - was often a strident affair, with justices grilling lawyers in ways that reflected their liberal and conservative bents. Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr., who was notably silent through most of the questioning, could cast the deciding vote.
BUSINESS
February 19, 2015 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
Theodore Ruger, a professor at the University of Pennsylvania Law School since 2004, has been appointed dean of the law school, effective July 1. Ruger, 46, who teaches constitutional law and health-related law and regulation, succeeds Michael A. Fitts, who left in July to become president of Tulane University. Wendell Pritchett has been interim dean and will continue as a professor on the faculties of the law school and the Graduate School of Education. Pritchett, 50, taught at Penn Law from 2001 to 2009, when he left to become chancellor of Rutgers-Camden.
NEWS
February 11, 2015 | BY JENNY DeHUFF, Daily News Staff Writer dehuffj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5218
FORMER Montgomery County Republican Party Chairman Bob Kerns pleaded guilty to a sex crime last year. Now his license to practice law has been revoked. On Friday, the state Supreme Court's disciplinary board temporarily suspended Kerns' law license. According to his attorney, Brian McMonagle, he hasn't been practicing law anyway since his arrest. "He's disassociated himself from the law firm [Hladik, Onorato & Pearlstine, based in North Wales], and hasn't been practicing since," McMonagle said.
BUSINESS
January 17, 2015 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
Supreme Court Associate Justice Samuel A. Alito Jr. came to Philadelphia Thursday to accept a citizenship award honoring the late appellate judge Edward R. Becker, and devoted most of a 35-minute speech at the Community College of Philadelphia to lauding his former colleague. Alito served on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit in Philadelphia with Becker before Alito ascended to the Supreme Court in 2006. Democrats voiced concern about Alito's nomination by former President George W. Bush, and, in an unusual move, Becker led a group of seven federal judges to testify in his favor at Senate Judiciary Committee hearings chaired by the late Sen. Arlen Specter.
NEWS
September 8, 2014 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jeffrey Rosen, author, constitutional law professor, and president and chief executive officer of the National Constitution Center, may have hit upon a novel idea. At a time when public debate over the central constitutional and political issues of the day has devolved into a dispiriting swamp of   ad hominem attacks, misleading ad campaigns, and television shouting matches, Rosen says there is a public hunger for civilized, respectful conversation. Since taking over at the center last year, he has organized a series of public forums featuring prominent guests from the political right and left to unravel weighty and emotional issues, from gun control to the use of drone strikes, within the context of constitutional law. Give Rosen half a chance and he waxes rhapsodic about the nation's founding documents.
BUSINESS
December 10, 2013
Hangley Aronchick Segal Pudlin & Schiller , Philadelphia, hired Dina L. Hardy as an associate in the litigation department. She was a law clerk for Judge Thomas L. Ambro of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit and Mary A. McLaughlin of the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania. Capehart Scatchard named Katherine A. Hellander and Alycia I. Pollice-Beyrouty as associates in the firm's workers' compensation department in its Mount Laurel office. Hellander worked as a law clerk to Judge Nan S. Famular , in the New Jersey Superior Court, Family Division, Camden County Vicinage.
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