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Law Degree

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NEWS
May 28, 2004 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Richard Turkington, 63, of Collegeville, a Villanova University law professor for 27 years who was a leading expert on the First Amendment and privacy laws, died of cancer May 20 at home. "He was a pioneer in the area," said John Decker, a professor at DePaul University Law School in Chicago and a friend. "Nobody dealt as deeply or comprehensively with the issue of privacy as he did. " Professor Turkington wrote Teacher's Manual for Privacy and was contributing editor to AIDS, A Medical-Legal Handbook and AIDS, Law and Society.
BUSINESS
March 4, 2013 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
Is a two-year law degree the answer to soaring tuition costs and an anemic job market for many law school graduates? The idea is gaining traction among some academics and law firm leaders who say it has potential to reduce tuition-debt burdens while enabling law firms to hire first-year lawyers at lower salaries and reduce charges to clients. "I think you can learn more [by spending] a third year in a law firm than you can in the third year of law school," said Sheldon Bonovitz, the former chairman of Center City's Duane Morris L.L.P.
NEWS
July 11, 1997 | By Ralph Vigoda, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Finish college and get your law degree - in just six years! That is the promise held out to students at Pennsylvania's 14 state-run universities, under a new partnership between the public State System of Higher Education and Widener University, a private institution. The 3+3 Early Admission Program, announced yesterday, gives qualified students the option to leave undergraduate studies after three years to enter the Widener School of Law in Harrisburg. The first year of law school would also satisfy credit requirements for a bachelor's degree.
NEWS
June 15, 1998 | By Rachel Scheier, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Every evening for 12 years, Emily Ryan neatly arranged her children around the dining-room table and served dinner precisely at 5, just as her husband arrived from the office. She shepherded her five sons and daughters to and from school and afternoon sports. She volunteered as a home-room mother, participated in scouting, and sewed doll clothes. Then one Saturday, she woke up and found a lump in her breast. "I just assumed I was going to die," recalled Ryan, whose sister had succumbed to breast cancer just months earlier.
NEWS
May 27, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
Carl M. Buchholz, 51, of Flourtown, a Philadelphia lawyer and civic leader who was tapped by President George W. Bush to help create the White House Office of Homeland Security after 9/11, died of cancer Monday, May 23, at his home. "He was an unmatched leader as well as one of the most dedicated, forthright, and effective colleagues I've had the privilege to work with," said Drexel University president John A. Fry, who knew Mr. Buchholz as a friend and Drexel board member. "He fought hard and bravely over the past year against the disease that took his life.
NEWS
July 15, 2012 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
A U.S. district judge handed prison terms Friday to the founder of a Northwest Philadelphia charter school and its former chief executive for stealing $522,000 in taxpayer money to prop up a restaurant, a health-food store, and a private school they controlled, and for defrauding a bank. Hugh C. Clark, a lawyer who helped found New Media Technology Charter School and served for many years as its board president, was sentenced to 24 months in federal prison. Ina Walker, a career educator and the charter school's former chief executive officer, was sentenced to six months in prison.
NEWS
June 3, 2016 | By Stu Bykofsky
WHEN HE received his 2017 real estate bill, Steve Silver reached for the duct tape, to keep his head from exploding. Although the tax on his new house in the Italian Market area didn't change, thanks to an abatement, the value of the land it sits on skyrocketed 1,245 percent. He complains that he's a victim of bait and switch, a shell game run by his adopted city. A Pittsburgh native, Silver, 29, came to Philly to attend Temple Law, from which he emerged with a law degree.
NEWS
October 25, 2007 | By Gayle Ronan Sims INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Benjamin Strauss, 71, the dashingly handsome scion and chairman of the Philadelphia-based Pep Boys auto-parts firm, known coast to coast for its timeless caricatures of Manny, Moe and Jack, died of prostate cancer Sunday at home in Haverford. The son of Maurice "Moe" Strauss, the ringleader of the original trio, Mr. Strauss joined Pep Boys in 1964 after practicing law in California. He was named president in 1975 and was chairman from 1978 until retiring in 1992. Mr. Strauss was not only successful in business, but he also was passionate about his family, the outdoors, philanthropy, the arts, and sports, particularly the Philadelphia Eagles.
NEWS
December 4, 2011 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Marvin Lundy, 80, of Rittenhouse Square, a lawyer who was a benefactor and fund-raiser for numerous charitable, cultural, and educational institutions, died of heart failure Thursday, Dec. 1, at Penn Hospice at Rittenhouse. Mr. Lundy was chairman of Lundy Law in Philadelphia. The firm specializes in personal-injury law, including cases involving automobile accidents, medical malpractice, product liability, construction accidents, and pharmaceutical injuries. It was Mr. Lundy's policy to meet with the firm's new clients, his nephew Leonard Lundy said.
NEWS
May 15, 2016 | By Aubrey Whelan and Emily Babay, STAFF WRITERS
Peter Liacouras had a vision for Temple University. He wanted the commuter school on North Broad Street to become a world-class institution. He wanted star sports teams and leafy green quads and all the hallmarks of a classic American college experience. He wanted a diverse faculty and a student body that looked like the city Temple called home. And for nearly two decades as Temple president, he charged headfirst toward that vision - courting controversy along the way - as the university he dreamed of slowly became reality.
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NEWS
June 24, 2016 | By Janaki Chadha, Staff Writer
In what is likely to be a rigorous cross-disciplinary experience, the University of Pennsylvania will launch a program next year that would offer candidates a chance to earn degrees in law and medicine. It will take students six years to complete, while a medical degree takes four years and a law degree three. The program will be directed primarily at students pursuing medical careers, with the aim of helping future doctors gain skills that could prove valuable in parts of the field where the importance of legal knowledge is growing.
NEWS
June 18, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
Andrea G. Tillis Solomon, 68, a lawyer and longtime Delaware County resident, died Tuesday, June 14, of complications from a heart attack in Anne Arundel Medical Center in Annapolis, Md. Mrs. Solomon was attending the Bench Bar Conference of the Delaware County Bar Association in Annapolis when she collapsed in her hotel room, said daughter Maria. Doctors could not revive her. A native of Vatili, Cyprus, Mrs. Solomon came to the United States at the age of 3e with her widowed mother, Mary Tillis.
NEWS
June 13, 2016
Valerie Pracilio and Justin Csik April 23, 2016 in Philadelphia Hello there The Sunday before Memorial Day 2012, Justin slid into a pew at St. Thomas' in Brigantine and was stunned to see an old classmate from Bishop Eustace Prep. "Hi, Valerie!" he said quietly. "Oh, my gosh. Hi!" said Valerie. She grew up in Mount Laurel, he in Medford Township. Friendly acquaintances, they had friends in common, but had seen each other in passing only a few times in a decade. Yet after Mass, they lingered in the parking lot - a Class of 2001 reunion for two. Valerie had since earned a health-care administration degree from the University of Scranton, then a master's in public health from Thomas Jefferson University.
NEWS
June 3, 2016 | By Stu Bykofsky
WHEN HE received his 2017 real estate bill, Steve Silver reached for the duct tape, to keep his head from exploding. Although the tax on his new house in the Italian Market area didn't change, thanks to an abatement, the value of the land it sits on skyrocketed 1,245 percent. He complains that he's a victim of bait and switch, a shell game run by his adopted city. A Pittsburgh native, Silver, 29, came to Philly to attend Temple Law, from which he emerged with a law degree.
NEWS
May 27, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
Carl M. Buchholz, 51, of Flourtown, a Philadelphia lawyer and civic leader who was tapped by President George W. Bush to help create the White House Office of Homeland Security after 9/11, died of cancer Monday, May 23, at his home. "He was an unmatched leader as well as one of the most dedicated, forthright, and effective colleagues I've had the privilege to work with," said Drexel University president John A. Fry, who knew Mr. Buchholz as a friend and Drexel board member. "He fought hard and bravely over the past year against the disease that took his life.
NEWS
May 15, 2016 | By Aubrey Whelan and Emily Babay, STAFF WRITERS
Peter Liacouras had a vision for Temple University. He wanted the commuter school on North Broad Street to become a world-class institution. He wanted star sports teams and leafy green quads and all the hallmarks of a classic American college experience. He wanted a diverse faculty and a student body that looked like the city Temple called home. And for nearly two decades as Temple president, he charged headfirst toward that vision - courting controversy along the way - as the university he dreamed of slowly became reality.
SPORTS
May 11, 2016 | By Bob Ford, Inquirer Columnist
Up until Monday, it was possible to understand what Sam Bradford was doing after the Eagles moved up in the draft to take Carson Wentz and essentially relegate Bradford to his spot on the menu as yesterday's potatoes. Even if you didn't agree with Bradford when he stopped attending team activities and requested a trade, at least the rationale made some sense. We can debate forever the notion that a guy who worked to come back from three serious surgeries might not have the resolve to compete, but there was no getting around the fact that his chance to be the long-term starter here had been seriously diminished.
NEWS
May 4, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
Susan M. Jordan Schmader, 57, of Newtown Square, a U.S. Labor Department lawyer for more than three decades, died Thursday, April 28, of ovarian cancer at home. Mrs. Schmader was born and reared in Absecon, N.J. She graduated from Holy Spirit High School, and earned a bachelor's degree in political science and business from Rutgers University. She received a law degree from Rutgers-Camden School of Law. She was admitted to the bar in Pennsylvania and New Jersey. During a 32-year career with the Department of Labor, Mrs. Schmader rose from trial attorney to senior trial attorney and finally to regional counsel in the department's solicitor's office for the last 13 years.
NEWS
April 21, 2016
John C. Rafferty Jr. Age: 63 Residence: Audubon, Montgomery County. Family: Single, no children. Occupation: State senator, 44th District. Campaign website: raffertyforag.com Education: bachelor's degree, University of Pittsburgh at Johnstown; master's degree, Beaver College; law degree, Temple University. Career: Lawyer; deputy attorney general prosecuting Medicaid fraud, 1988 to 1991; state senator, 2003-present. Joseph C. Peters Age: 58 Residence: Lake Winola, Wyoming County.
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