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Law Degree

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NEWS
May 28, 2004 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Richard Turkington, 63, of Collegeville, a Villanova University law professor for 27 years who was a leading expert on the First Amendment and privacy laws, died of cancer May 20 at home. "He was a pioneer in the area," said John Decker, a professor at DePaul University Law School in Chicago and a friend. "Nobody dealt as deeply or comprehensively with the issue of privacy as he did. " Professor Turkington wrote Teacher's Manual for Privacy and was contributing editor to AIDS, A Medical-Legal Handbook and AIDS, Law and Society.
BUSINESS
March 4, 2013 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
Is a two-year law degree the answer to soaring tuition costs and an anemic job market for many law school graduates? The idea is gaining traction among some academics and law firm leaders who say it has potential to reduce tuition-debt burdens while enabling law firms to hire first-year lawyers at lower salaries and reduce charges to clients. "I think you can learn more [by spending] a third year in a law firm than you can in the third year of law school," said Sheldon Bonovitz, the former chairman of Center City's Duane Morris L.L.P.
NEWS
July 11, 1997 | By Ralph Vigoda, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Finish college and get your law degree - in just six years! That is the promise held out to students at Pennsylvania's 14 state-run universities, under a new partnership between the public State System of Higher Education and Widener University, a private institution. The 3+3 Early Admission Program, announced yesterday, gives qualified students the option to leave undergraduate studies after three years to enter the Widener School of Law in Harrisburg. The first year of law school would also satisfy credit requirements for a bachelor's degree.
NEWS
June 15, 1998 | By Rachel Scheier, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Every evening for 12 years, Emily Ryan neatly arranged her children around the dining-room table and served dinner precisely at 5, just as her husband arrived from the office. She shepherded her five sons and daughters to and from school and afternoon sports. She volunteered as a home-room mother, participated in scouting, and sewed doll clothes. Then one Saturday, she woke up and found a lump in her breast. "I just assumed I was going to die," recalled Ryan, whose sister had succumbed to breast cancer just months earlier.
NEWS
June 26, 2014 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
Among the six South Jersey lawyers Gov. Christie has nominated for Superior Court judgeships is a former high school Spanish teacher at Camden Catholic High School who went on to work as a deputy attorney general and later ran for Congress. The nominees, announced last week, now must be confirmed by the state Senate. Though they live in Burlington and Camden Counties, they could be assigned to serve their terms anywhere in the state once they are approved. The nominees are: David M. Ragonese of Haddon Heights; Gerard H. Breland of Burlington Township; Daniel A. Bernardin and Morris G. Smith of Collingswood; Sherri L. Schweitzer of Cherry Hill; and Mark P. Tarantino of Moorestown.
BUSINESS
September 20, 2014 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
They say it is good to be king. It might be better, though, to be a very successful trial lawyer. Thomas R. Kline, who unveiled a $50 million gift to the Drexel University law school on Wednesday, and Shanin Specter, his partner at Kline & Specter P.C., would seem to fit that description. From its founding in 1995, the firm has grown to 35 lawyers and 115 employees overall, the largest personal-injury law firm in Pennsylvania and one of the largest in the country. The firm is known for big-ticket, emotional cases, and devotes considerable time to screening matters before agreeing to represent a client, with three staff members, a nurse, and two lawyers, one with a nursing degree, doing the intake.
NEWS
October 25, 2007 | By Gayle Ronan Sims INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Benjamin Strauss, 71, the dashingly handsome scion and chairman of the Philadelphia-based Pep Boys auto-parts firm, known coast to coast for its timeless caricatures of Manny, Moe and Jack, died of prostate cancer Sunday at home in Haverford. The son of Maurice "Moe" Strauss, the ringleader of the original trio, Mr. Strauss joined Pep Boys in 1964 after practicing law in California. He was named president in 1975 and was chairman from 1978 until retiring in 1992. Mr. Strauss was not only successful in business, but he also was passionate about his family, the outdoors, philanthropy, the arts, and sports, particularly the Philadelphia Eagles.
NEWS
December 4, 2011 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Marvin Lundy, 80, of Rittenhouse Square, a lawyer who was a benefactor and fund-raiser for numerous charitable, cultural, and educational institutions, died of heart failure Thursday, Dec. 1, at Penn Hospice at Rittenhouse. Mr. Lundy was chairman of Lundy Law in Philadelphia. The firm specializes in personal-injury law, including cases involving automobile accidents, medical malpractice, product liability, construction accidents, and pharmaceutical injuries. It was Mr. Lundy's policy to meet with the firm's new clients, his nephew Leonard Lundy said.
BUSINESS
November 5, 2013 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
It is the last agonizing hurdle of law school, and it takes place after graduation. Each summer and fall, thousands of law students nationwide throw themselves into frenzied review courses in advance of taking the bar exam. They spend hundreds of hours and often quite a bit of money cramming for a test that will, for most, decide whether the three preceding years lead to a career or were merely a futile exercise. This torment typically has been the newly graduated law student's alone to bear.
NEWS
April 25, 2014 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
Rutgers University announced a new chancellor Wednesday for its Camden campus: a former professor at Temple University's law school who is now the law school dean at the University of Maryland. Phoebe A. Haddon, 63, will join Rutgers-Camden on July 1, returning to a region where she worked for decades and the state where she grew up. "It seems like a great place for me to come to after five years of being a dean here. It has a real nice-size campus for the kind of work that I'd like to do," Haddon said Wednesday afternoon.
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BUSINESS
September 20, 2014 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
They say it is good to be king. It might be better, though, to be a very successful trial lawyer. Thomas R. Kline, who unveiled a $50 million gift to the Drexel University law school on Wednesday, and Shanin Specter, his partner at Kline & Specter P.C., would seem to fit that description. From its founding in 1995, the firm has grown to 35 lawyers and 115 employees overall, the largest personal-injury law firm in Pennsylvania and one of the largest in the country. The firm is known for big-ticket, emotional cases, and devotes considerable time to screening matters before agreeing to represent a client, with three staff members, a nurse, and two lawyers, one with a nursing degree, doing the intake.
NEWS
September 5, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
F. EMMETT Fitzpatrick, one of the most prominent defense lawyers in a city famous for them, felt that the law was more than a profession - it was a mission. "Being a defense attorney was really his mission in life," said his son, F. Emmett Fitzpatrick III, also a lawyer. "The law was to him a vocation, a calling. When anybody came to him with a need, a problem, he saw it as his mission to help that person. " His father, who died Tuesday at age 84, worked both sides of the courtroom.
NEWS
August 6, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Nicholas Kozay Jr., 86, of Philadelphia, a retired Common Pleas Court judge, died Thursday, July 31, of congestive heart failure at his home. While training as a lawyer, Judge Kozay began his career in the Municipal Court system as a clerk. In the early 1970s, he was appointed jury commissioner. He went on to implement the "one day/one trial" system for jurors. Under the one-day model, a potential juror comes to the courthouse knowing that if he or she is not chosen for jury duty by the end of the day, the obligation to serve has been met. His family said that the program was very well-received, and that he traveled to other cities to show officials how to implement it. Judge Kozay was appointed to Common Pleas Court in 1989 as a Family Court judge.
REAL_ESTATE
August 4, 2014 | By Erin Arvedlund, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia needs more low-income housing for veterans, particularly those who served in recent conflicts such as the Gulf War, says Walter Kubiak of Mission First Housing Group. Kubiak, a Vietnam veteran, knows that vets often have mental-health issues that don't manifest themselves for years, and that they may then have trouble finding housing. "We have a lot of young people in Philadelphia who've spent years in combat under incredible stress," he said. "They come back with head injuries that would have killed them in previous wars.
NEWS
August 1, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
William G. O'Neill, 88, a longtime Philadelphia tax lawyer and a founder of Waverly Heights, one of the first continuing-care communities in the Philadelphia area, died Tuesday, July 29, from complications of a stroke at Waverly Heights in Gladwyne. Until 1992, when he left to found his own firm, Mr. O'Neill was a managing partner of the Philadelphia law firm Obermayer Rebmann Maxwell & Hippel. His niche was tax law, and he wrote, taught, and lectured widely on the topic. But he broke ground in the mid-1980s when he saw a need to establish a new type of community that would cater to the growing number of wealthy seniors on the Main Line and elsewhere.
NEWS
July 16, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
John Todd Stewart Jr., 89, of Blue Bell, a former executive with Fidelity Bank, died Thursday, July 3, at Normandy Farms Retirement Community. Born in Pittsburgh, Mr. Stewart grew up in Butler, Pa., and graduated from Butler Public High School in 1941. At age 16, he enrolled in Harvard College, where he was a member of the crew team. He graduated in 1944. He completed a law degree in 1948 at Yale School of Law, with a focus on banking. After graduating, Mr. Stewart worked for the Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland.
NEWS
July 11, 2014 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
Among the favorite tokens that the Rev. William "Jud" Weiksnar will take with him from his time in Camden is a collage of a small girl standing atop a mound of grass, created with shattered glass and litter cleared from Von Nieda Park. The "trash art" was one of the few remaining items in Weiksnar's parish office Tuesday as he packed up to move after nine years as pastor of St. Anthony of Padua Church. The image, created seven years ago by then-third grade student Soledad Velazquez, shows the girl and a godlike figure holding hands beneath an apple tree.
NEWS
July 6, 2014 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
Steven F. Gadon, 82, of Haverford, managing partner of the Center City law firm of Spector, Gadon & Rosen, a marathon racewalker, a die-hard Eagles fan, and an opera lover, died at his summer home in Margate, N.J., on Friday, July 4. A resident of Haverford, Mr. Gadon was devoted to his large family and enjoyed practicing law so much that he continued to go to the office four days a week until he was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer right after...
NEWS
June 26, 2014 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
Among the six South Jersey lawyers Gov. Christie has nominated for Superior Court judgeships is a former high school Spanish teacher at Camden Catholic High School who went on to work as a deputy attorney general and later ran for Congress. The nominees, announced last week, now must be confirmed by the state Senate. Though they live in Burlington and Camden Counties, they could be assigned to serve their terms anywhere in the state once they are approved. The nominees are: David M. Ragonese of Haddon Heights; Gerard H. Breland of Burlington Township; Daniel A. Bernardin and Morris G. Smith of Collingswood; Sherri L. Schweitzer of Cherry Hill; and Mark P. Tarantino of Moorestown.
NEWS
June 25, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
THE POOL OF BLACK lawyers in Pennsylvania was given a needed boost in the early '70s thanks to men like Charles Mitchell. Charles and other African-American lawyers recognized that the bar examination discriminated against black candidates. They decided to take action. The result was that the Pennsylvania Supreme Court agreed to change the bar exam from essay questions to multiple choice and to stop requiring candidates to submit photographs with their applications. "After these changes, the number of black candidates rose significantly and resulted in a larger pool of black attorneys," said his son Charles L. Mitchell.
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