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Law Degree

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NEWS
May 28, 2004 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Richard Turkington, 63, of Collegeville, a Villanova University law professor for 27 years who was a leading expert on the First Amendment and privacy laws, died of cancer May 20 at home. "He was a pioneer in the area," said John Decker, a professor at DePaul University Law School in Chicago and a friend. "Nobody dealt as deeply or comprehensively with the issue of privacy as he did. " Professor Turkington wrote Teacher's Manual for Privacy and was contributing editor to AIDS, A Medical-Legal Handbook and AIDS, Law and Society.
BUSINESS
March 4, 2013 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
Is a two-year law degree the answer to soaring tuition costs and an anemic job market for many law school graduates? The idea is gaining traction among some academics and law firm leaders who say it has potential to reduce tuition-debt burdens while enabling law firms to hire first-year lawyers at lower salaries and reduce charges to clients. "I think you can learn more [by spending] a third year in a law firm than you can in the third year of law school," said Sheldon Bonovitz, the former chairman of Center City's Duane Morris L.L.P.
NEWS
July 11, 1997 | By Ralph Vigoda, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Finish college and get your law degree - in just six years! That is the promise held out to students at Pennsylvania's 14 state-run universities, under a new partnership between the public State System of Higher Education and Widener University, a private institution. The 3+3 Early Admission Program, announced yesterday, gives qualified students the option to leave undergraduate studies after three years to enter the Widener School of Law in Harrisburg. The first year of law school would also satisfy credit requirements for a bachelor's degree.
NEWS
June 15, 1998 | By Rachel Scheier, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Every evening for 12 years, Emily Ryan neatly arranged her children around the dining-room table and served dinner precisely at 5, just as her husband arrived from the office. She shepherded her five sons and daughters to and from school and afternoon sports. She volunteered as a home-room mother, participated in scouting, and sewed doll clothes. Then one Saturday, she woke up and found a lump in her breast. "I just assumed I was going to die," recalled Ryan, whose sister had succumbed to breast cancer just months earlier.
NEWS
November 26, 2014 | BY WILLIAM BENDER, Daily News Staff Writer benderw@phillynews.com, 215-854-5255
HAS CHAKA FATTAH JR. lost his marbles? Or does the indicted son of the embattled congressman have a plan - a secret legal strategy that will lead to his acquittal? Either way, Fattah Jr. says he doesn't need a lawyer. Fattah Jr., 31, is asking the court for permission to represent himself - known as "pro se" representation - as he fights bank-fraud and tax-evasion charges. Last week, Fattah Jr. filed a motion to proceed pro se as his March 9 trial date approaches. He does not have a law degree - or a college degree, for that matter.
NEWS
June 26, 2014 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
Among the six South Jersey lawyers Gov. Christie has nominated for Superior Court judgeships is a former high school Spanish teacher at Camden Catholic High School who went on to work as a deputy attorney general and later ran for Congress. The nominees, announced last week, now must be confirmed by the state Senate. Though they live in Burlington and Camden Counties, they could be assigned to serve their terms anywhere in the state once they are approved. The nominees are: David M. Ragonese of Haddon Heights; Gerard H. Breland of Burlington Township; Daniel A. Bernardin and Morris G. Smith of Collingswood; Sherri L. Schweitzer of Cherry Hill; and Mark P. Tarantino of Moorestown.
NEWS
November 28, 2014 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
After nearly a decade of haranguing Philadelphia government officials on issues of ethics and transparency, the policy director and interim president of the watchdog group Committee of Seventy is stepping down. But not without speaking her mind. Ellen Mattleman Kaplan, 60, a Philadelphia-area native who lives in Chestnut Hill, has no plans yet for what she'll do next, other than visit her former boss, Zack Stalberg, who recently moved to New Mexico after stepping down as president of the committee.
NEWS
October 25, 2007 | By Gayle Ronan Sims INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Benjamin Strauss, 71, the dashingly handsome scion and chairman of the Philadelphia-based Pep Boys auto-parts firm, known coast to coast for its timeless caricatures of Manny, Moe and Jack, died of prostate cancer Sunday at home in Haverford. The son of Maurice "Moe" Strauss, the ringleader of the original trio, Mr. Strauss joined Pep Boys in 1964 after practicing law in California. He was named president in 1975 and was chairman from 1978 until retiring in 1992. Mr. Strauss was not only successful in business, but he also was passionate about his family, the outdoors, philanthropy, the arts, and sports, particularly the Philadelphia Eagles.
BUSINESS
September 20, 2014 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
They say it is good to be king. It might be better, though, to be a very successful trial lawyer. Thomas R. Kline, who unveiled a $50 million gift to the Drexel University law school on Wednesday, and Shanin Specter, his partner at Kline & Specter P.C., would seem to fit that description. From its founding in 1995, the firm has grown to 35 lawyers and 115 employees overall, the largest personal-injury law firm in Pennsylvania and one of the largest in the country. The firm is known for big-ticket, emotional cases, and devotes considerable time to screening matters before agreeing to represent a client, with three staff members, a nurse, and two lawyers, one with a nursing degree, doing the intake.
NEWS
December 4, 2011 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Marvin Lundy, 80, of Rittenhouse Square, a lawyer who was a benefactor and fund-raiser for numerous charitable, cultural, and educational institutions, died of heart failure Thursday, Dec. 1, at Penn Hospice at Rittenhouse. Mr. Lundy was chairman of Lundy Law in Philadelphia. The firm specializes in personal-injury law, including cases involving automobile accidents, medical malpractice, product liability, construction accidents, and pharmaceutical injuries. It was Mr. Lundy's policy to meet with the firm's new clients, his nephew Leonard Lundy said.
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NEWS
December 1, 2014 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
After nearly a decade of haranguing Philadelphia government officials on issues of ethics and transparency, the policy director and interim president of the watchdog group Committee of Seventy is stepping down. But not without speaking her mind. Ellen Mattleman Kaplan, 60, a Philadelphia-area native who lives in Chestnut Hill, has no plans yet for what she will do next, other than visit her former boss, Zack Stalberg, who recently moved to New Mexico after stepping down as president of the committee.
NEWS
November 26, 2014 | By Sam Carchidi, Inquirer Staff Writer
UNIONDALE, N.Y. - Pat Quinn, who coached the Flyers to an NHL-record 35-game unbeaten streak in 1979-80, died Sunday night in Vancouver at age 71 after a lengthy illness. Mr. Quinn was a big man with a gruff exterior, but he had a soft, caring side, said his former players. "Next to Fred Shero, Pat was the best coach who ever coached here," said Flyers executive Bob Clarke, who played for Mr. Quinn during the remarkable 35-game streak. "He changed the way the game was played in those days.
NEWS
November 26, 2014 | BY WILLIAM BENDER, Daily News Staff Writer benderw@phillynews.com, 215-854-5255
HAS CHAKA FATTAH JR. lost his marbles? Or does the indicted son of the embattled congressman have a plan - a secret legal strategy that will lead to his acquittal? Either way, Fattah Jr. says he doesn't need a lawyer. Fattah Jr., 31, is asking the court for permission to represent himself - known as "pro se" representation - as he fights bank-fraud and tax-evasion charges. Last week, Fattah Jr. filed a motion to proceed pro se as his March 9 trial date approaches. He does not have a law degree - or a college degree, for that matter.
NEWS
November 14, 2014 | BY REGINA MEDINA, Daily News Staff Writer medinar@phillynews.com, 215-854-5985
U.S. DISTRICT Judge Luis Felipe Restrepo, a native of Colombia, was nominated yesterday by President Obama to serve on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 3rd Circuit. Restrepo, 53, has served as a U.S. district judge in the Eastern District of Pennsylvania since June 2013, having been a U.S. magistrate in the Eastern District from 2006 to 2013. Restrepo has taught at Temple University's Beasley School of Law since 1993. Restrepo was 2 when he moved to the U.S. He earned a bachelor's degree in 1981 from the University of Pennsylvania and a law degree in 1986 from Tulane University Law School in New Orleans.
NEWS
November 2, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
James Albert Lineberger, 84, a retired Philadelphia Common Pleas Court judge, died Wednesday, Oct. 29, of end-stage renal failure at Kindred Hospital of the Palm Beaches in Riviera Beach, Fla. A former resident of Philadelphia and Pemberton, Burlington County, he had moved in 2010 to Port St. Lucie, Fla., to be close to his family. Judge Lineberger was elected to Common Pleas Court in 1991 after spending 13 years practicing law. While serving in the court's Criminal Trial Division, he presided over hundreds of cases.
BUSINESS
September 20, 2014 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
They say it is good to be king. It might be better, though, to be a very successful trial lawyer. Thomas R. Kline, who unveiled a $50 million gift to the Drexel University law school on Wednesday, and Shanin Specter, his partner at Kline & Specter P.C., would seem to fit that description. From its founding in 1995, the firm has grown to 35 lawyers and 115 employees overall, the largest personal-injury law firm in Pennsylvania and one of the largest in the country. The firm is known for big-ticket, emotional cases, and devotes considerable time to screening matters before agreeing to represent a client, with three staff members, a nurse, and two lawyers, one with a nursing degree, doing the intake.
NEWS
September 5, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
F. EMMETT Fitzpatrick, one of the most prominent defense lawyers in a city famous for them, felt that the law was more than a profession - it was a mission. "Being a defense attorney was really his mission in life," said his son, F. Emmett Fitzpatrick III, also a lawyer. "The law was to him a vocation, a calling. When anybody came to him with a need, a problem, he saw it as his mission to help that person. " His father, who died Tuesday at age 84, worked both sides of the courtroom.
NEWS
August 6, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Nicholas Kozay Jr., 86, of Philadelphia, a retired Common Pleas Court judge, died Thursday, July 31, of congestive heart failure at his home. While training as a lawyer, Judge Kozay began his career in the Municipal Court system as a clerk. In the early 1970s, he was appointed jury commissioner. He went on to implement the "one day/one trial" system for jurors. Under the one-day model, a potential juror comes to the courthouse knowing that if he or she is not chosen for jury duty by the end of the day, the obligation to serve has been met. His family said that the program was very well-received, and that he traveled to other cities to show officials how to implement it. Judge Kozay was appointed to Common Pleas Court in 1989 as a Family Court judge.
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