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Law Degree

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NEWS
May 28, 2004 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Richard Turkington, 63, of Collegeville, a Villanova University law professor for 27 years who was a leading expert on the First Amendment and privacy laws, died of cancer May 20 at home. "He was a pioneer in the area," said John Decker, a professor at DePaul University Law School in Chicago and a friend. "Nobody dealt as deeply or comprehensively with the issue of privacy as he did. " Professor Turkington wrote Teacher's Manual for Privacy and was contributing editor to AIDS, A Medical-Legal Handbook and AIDS, Law and Society.
BUSINESS
March 4, 2013 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
Is a two-year law degree the answer to soaring tuition costs and an anemic job market for many law school graduates? The idea is gaining traction among some academics and law firm leaders who say it has potential to reduce tuition-debt burdens while enabling law firms to hire first-year lawyers at lower salaries and reduce charges to clients. "I think you can learn more [by spending] a third year in a law firm than you can in the third year of law school," said Sheldon Bonovitz, the former chairman of Center City's Duane Morris L.L.P.
NEWS
September 2, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
Albert John Snite Jr., 68, of East Falls, a retired Philadelphia Common Pleas Court judge, died Wednesday, Aug. 31, of complications from lung cancer at his home. Judge Snite slipped away so peacefully that it wasn't immediately apparent that he had died, his wife, Julia Ann Conover, said. From January 1992 to January 2015, he presided over cases from the state court's First Judicial District bench in Philadelphia. He rotated through the Civil Division to the Criminal Division and to the Complex Litigation Center.
NEWS
July 11, 1997 | By Ralph Vigoda, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Finish college and get your law degree - in just six years! That is the promise held out to students at Pennsylvania's 14 state-run universities, under a new partnership between the public State System of Higher Education and Widener University, a private institution. The 3+3 Early Admission Program, announced yesterday, gives qualified students the option to leave undergraduate studies after three years to enter the Widener School of Law in Harrisburg. The first year of law school would also satisfy credit requirements for a bachelor's degree.
NEWS
June 15, 1998 | By Rachel Scheier, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Every evening for 12 years, Emily Ryan neatly arranged her children around the dining-room table and served dinner precisely at 5, just as her husband arrived from the office. She shepherded her five sons and daughters to and from school and afternoon sports. She volunteered as a home-room mother, participated in scouting, and sewed doll clothes. Then one Saturday, she woke up and found a lump in her breast. "I just assumed I was going to die," recalled Ryan, whose sister had succumbed to breast cancer just months earlier.
NEWS
May 27, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
Carl M. Buchholz, 51, of Flourtown, a Philadelphia lawyer and civic leader who was tapped by President George W. Bush to help create the White House Office of Homeland Security after 9/11, died of cancer Monday, May 23, at his home. "He was an unmatched leader as well as one of the most dedicated, forthright, and effective colleagues I've had the privilege to work with," said Drexel University president John A. Fry, who knew Mr. Buchholz as a friend and Drexel board member. "He fought hard and bravely over the past year against the disease that took his life.
NEWS
September 8, 2016 | By Kristin E. Holmes, STAFF WRITER
David G. Nation, 63, of Chestnut Hill, retired senior vice president of corporate affairs and general counsel of Bentley Systems Inc., an infrastructure software company in Exton, died of brain cancer Sunday, Aug. 28, at home. Mr. Nation joined Bentley in 1995, when the Chester County company was a firm of less than 100 employees that made software for engineers who design and construct roadways, water systems, and airports. Over the next 20 years, he negotiated dozens of acquisitions that transformed the firm into an international business with 3,200 employees in 55 countries.
NEWS
September 10, 2016 | By Barbara Boyer, Staff Writer
The prosecutor asked for a five-year term. The defendant, in a plea deal, agreed to that. Millions were stolen, a reputed member of the mob already had received a 30-year term, and the judge was known to be tough. So what happened in federal court in Camden on Thursday was unexpected. U.S. District Judge Robert Kugler turned to Cory Leshner; called him a "good person" with no criminal history; noted that the 33-year-old defendant with a law degree had a wife who was expecting their second child, a supportive family, and a job waiting for him; and sentenced him to a two-year term.
NEWS
May 21, 2013 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
For the last 13 years, Joan Mazzotti has made a public career of helping low-income, first-generation students from Philadelphia's public high schools get into and through college. Quietly, she and her husband, Michael Kelly, also have made it a personal mission in the case of two Haitian-born orphans, who received their degrees Sunday at Haverford College, a selective, liberal arts school on the Main Line. In true fashion as the stand-in parents they have become to Ralph and Ruben Alexis, Mazzotti and Kelly got to the ceremony early and staked out seats in the fourth row. They took video as Ralph Alexis, 21, a French major, stepped on stage at the Alumni Field House to receive his diploma along with nearly 300 graduates.
NEWS
December 16, 2010 | By Larry King, Inquirer Staff Writer
Daryl Childs says he still feels the effects of the beating he took 25 years ago outside a Norristown gym. Sometimes, he says, his mind still fumbles for words that won't come. Brain damage from the blows kept him from completing college, the unemployed Florida construction worker contends. "I can't even tell you how much I have been affected by what Dave did to me," Childs, 48, said Wednesday. "Things I was trying to accomplish, I had to put on hold. I had to learn how to read and write all over again.
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NEWS
September 15, 2016 | By Susan Snyder, Staff Writer
Joan Mazzotti always has a story about a student who has faced tough circumstances but has persevered to get to and through college - with her organization's help. In Mazzotti's more than 16 years at the helm of Philadelphia Futures, the nonprofit organization has shepherded more than 500 students through cash-strapped public high schools in the city and on to college. Among them were two Haitian-born orphans whom she and her husband mentored. Now, Mazzotti herself is preparing to take a culminating step.
NEWS
September 10, 2016 | By Barbara Boyer, Staff Writer
The prosecutor asked for a five-year term. The defendant, in a plea deal, agreed to that. Millions were stolen, a reputed member of the mob already had received a 30-year term, and the judge was known to be tough. So what happened in federal court in Camden on Thursday was unexpected. U.S. District Judge Robert Kugler turned to Cory Leshner; called him a "good person" with no criminal history; noted that the 33-year-old defendant with a law degree had a wife who was expecting their second child, a supportive family, and a job waiting for him; and sentenced him to a two-year term.
NEWS
September 8, 2016 | By Kristin E. Holmes, STAFF WRITER
David G. Nation, 63, of Chestnut Hill, retired senior vice president of corporate affairs and general counsel of Bentley Systems Inc., an infrastructure software company in Exton, died of brain cancer Sunday, Aug. 28, at home. Mr. Nation joined Bentley in 1995, when the Chester County company was a firm of less than 100 employees that made software for engineers who design and construct roadways, water systems, and airports. Over the next 20 years, he negotiated dozens of acquisitions that transformed the firm into an international business with 3,200 employees in 55 countries.
NEWS
September 2, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
Albert John Snite Jr., 68, of East Falls, a retired Philadelphia Common Pleas Court judge, died Wednesday, Aug. 31, of complications from lung cancer at his home. Judge Snite slipped away so peacefully that it wasn't immediately apparent that he had died, his wife, Julia Ann Conover, said. From January 1992 to January 2015, he presided over cases from the state court's First Judicial District bench in Philadelphia. He rotated through the Civil Division to the Criminal Division and to the Complex Litigation Center.
NEWS
June 24, 2016 | By Janaki Chadha, Staff Writer
In what is likely to be a rigorous cross-disciplinary experience, the University of Pennsylvania will launch a program next year that would offer candidates a chance to earn degrees in law and medicine. It will take students six years to complete, while a medical degree takes four years and a law degree three. The program will be directed primarily at students pursuing medical careers, with the aim of helping future doctors gain skills that could prove valuable in parts of the field where the importance of legal knowledge is growing.
NEWS
June 18, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
Andrea G. Tillis Solomon, 68, a lawyer and longtime Delaware County resident, died Tuesday, June 14, of complications from a heart attack in Anne Arundel Medical Center in Annapolis, Md. Mrs. Solomon was attending the Bench Bar Conference of the Delaware County Bar Association in Annapolis when she collapsed in her hotel room, said daughter Maria. Doctors could not revive her. A native of Vatili, Cyprus, Mrs. Solomon came to the United States at the age of 3e with her widowed mother, Mary Tillis.
NEWS
June 13, 2016
Valerie Pracilio and Justin Csik April 23, 2016 in Philadelphia Hello there The Sunday before Memorial Day 2012, Justin slid into a pew at St. Thomas' in Brigantine and was stunned to see an old classmate from Bishop Eustace Prep. "Hi, Valerie!" he said quietly. "Oh, my gosh. Hi!" said Valerie. She grew up in Mount Laurel, he in Medford Township. Friendly acquaintances, they had friends in common, but had seen each other in passing only a few times in a decade. Yet after Mass, they lingered in the parking lot - a Class of 2001 reunion for two. Valerie had since earned a health-care administration degree from the University of Scranton, then a master's in public health from Thomas Jefferson University.
NEWS
June 3, 2016 | By Stu Bykofsky
WHEN HE received his 2017 real estate bill, Steve Silver reached for the duct tape, to keep his head from exploding. Although the tax on his new house in the Italian Market area didn't change, thanks to an abatement, the value of the land it sits on skyrocketed 1,245 percent. He complains that he's a victim of bait and switch, a shell game run by his adopted city. A Pittsburgh native, Silver, 29, came to Philly to attend Temple Law, from which he emerged with a law degree.
NEWS
May 27, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
Carl M. Buchholz, 51, of Flourtown, a Philadelphia lawyer and civic leader who was tapped by President George W. Bush to help create the White House Office of Homeland Security after 9/11, died of cancer Monday, May 23, at his home. "He was an unmatched leader as well as one of the most dedicated, forthright, and effective colleagues I've had the privilege to work with," said Drexel University president John A. Fry, who knew Mr. Buchholz as a friend and Drexel board member. "He fought hard and bravely over the past year against the disease that took his life.
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