CollectionsLaw Degree
IN THE NEWS

Law Degree

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
May 28, 2004 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Richard Turkington, 63, of Collegeville, a Villanova University law professor for 27 years who was a leading expert on the First Amendment and privacy laws, died of cancer May 20 at home. "He was a pioneer in the area," said John Decker, a professor at DePaul University Law School in Chicago and a friend. "Nobody dealt as deeply or comprehensively with the issue of privacy as he did. " Professor Turkington wrote Teacher's Manual for Privacy and was contributing editor to AIDS, A Medical-Legal Handbook and AIDS, Law and Society.
BUSINESS
March 4, 2013 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
Is a two-year law degree the answer to soaring tuition costs and an anemic job market for many law school graduates? The idea is gaining traction among some academics and law firm leaders who say it has potential to reduce tuition-debt burdens while enabling law firms to hire first-year lawyers at lower salaries and reduce charges to clients. "I think you can learn more [by spending] a third year in a law firm than you can in the third year of law school," said Sheldon Bonovitz, the former chairman of Center City's Duane Morris L.L.P.
NEWS
July 11, 1997 | By Ralph Vigoda, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Finish college and get your law degree - in just six years! That is the promise held out to students at Pennsylvania's 14 state-run universities, under a new partnership between the public State System of Higher Education and Widener University, a private institution. The 3+3 Early Admission Program, announced yesterday, gives qualified students the option to leave undergraduate studies after three years to enter the Widener School of Law in Harrisburg. The first year of law school would also satisfy credit requirements for a bachelor's degree.
NEWS
June 15, 1998 | By Rachel Scheier, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Every evening for 12 years, Emily Ryan neatly arranged her children around the dining-room table and served dinner precisely at 5, just as her husband arrived from the office. She shepherded her five sons and daughters to and from school and afternoon sports. She volunteered as a home-room mother, participated in scouting, and sewed doll clothes. Then one Saturday, she woke up and found a lump in her breast. "I just assumed I was going to die," recalled Ryan, whose sister had succumbed to breast cancer just months earlier.
NEWS
February 21, 2014 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
CAMDEN Wendell Pritchett, the outgoing chancellor of Rutgers-Camden, will join the University of Pennsylvania Law School on July 1, Penn announced Wednesday morning. He previously had said he planned to take a one-year sabbatical and turn to teaching full-time at Rutgers-Camden. Pritchett, 49, steps down as chancellor at the end of June. The new position will be familiar to him. Pritchett, who holds a Ph.D. degree in history from Penn, taught at the law school from 2001 to 2009. He was an associate dean between 2006 and 2008.
NEWS
December 25, 2013 | By Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writer
D. Donald Jamieson, 87, a Philadelphia lawyer who worked to reform the court system and rose to become president judge of the Court of Common Pleas, died Sunday, Dec. 15, of natural causes at his home in DeLand, Fla. In addition to serving as a judge, Judge Jamieson also was an active civic leader who served as a board member for numerous charitable organizations, and was a mentor to politicians such as Gov. Ed Rendell and Sen. Arlen Specter....
NEWS
April 3, 2014
ERIC EPSTEIN and Gene Stilp fight the powers that be. Have for decades. They're loathed and cursed by those who thrive in Pennsylvania's political culture, reason enough to value their efforts. But they also share a commitment to citizen action in a world increasingly disconnected. These days, as elected leaders sit on their hands on any number of issues, such commitment is worth noting. "If you look at the Legislature like an ocean liner," says Stilp, "Eric and I are like tugboats trying to push the bow in the right direction.
NEWS
October 25, 2007 | By Gayle Ronan Sims INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Benjamin Strauss, 71, the dashingly handsome scion and chairman of the Philadelphia-based Pep Boys auto-parts firm, known coast to coast for its timeless caricatures of Manny, Moe and Jack, died of prostate cancer Sunday at home in Haverford. The son of Maurice "Moe" Strauss, the ringleader of the original trio, Mr. Strauss joined Pep Boys in 1964 after practicing law in California. He was named president in 1975 and was chairman from 1978 until retiring in 1992. Mr. Strauss was not only successful in business, but he also was passionate about his family, the outdoors, philanthropy, the arts, and sports, particularly the Philadelphia Eagles.
NEWS
December 4, 2011 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Marvin Lundy, 80, of Rittenhouse Square, a lawyer who was a benefactor and fund-raiser for numerous charitable, cultural, and educational institutions, died of heart failure Thursday, Dec. 1, at Penn Hospice at Rittenhouse. Mr. Lundy was chairman of Lundy Law in Philadelphia. The firm specializes in personal-injury law, including cases involving automobile accidents, medical malpractice, product liability, construction accidents, and pharmaceutical injuries. It was Mr. Lundy's policy to meet with the firm's new clients, his nephew Leonard Lundy said.
NEWS
July 15, 2012 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
A U.S. district judge handed prison terms Friday to the founder of a Northwest Philadelphia charter school and its former chief executive for stealing $522,000 in taxpayer money to prop up a restaurant, a health-food store, and a private school they controlled, and for defrauding a bank. Hugh C. Clark, a lawyer who helped found New Media Technology Charter School and served for many years as its board president, was sentenced to 24 months in federal prison. Ina Walker, a career educator and the charter school's former chief executive officer, was sentenced to six months in prison.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 3, 2014
ERIC EPSTEIN and Gene Stilp fight the powers that be. Have for decades. They're loathed and cursed by those who thrive in Pennsylvania's political culture, reason enough to value their efforts. But they also share a commitment to citizen action in a world increasingly disconnected. These days, as elected leaders sit on their hands on any number of issues, such commitment is worth noting. "If you look at the Legislature like an ocean liner," says Stilp, "Eric and I are like tugboats trying to push the bow in the right direction.
NEWS
March 14, 2014 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
After Mary Pat Christie presented the award, once cameras stopped flashing and the crowd dispersed, Jodina Hicks - the latest "New Jersey Hero" - finally got to see the person who she says saved her life. Carter, age 4, ran up to his mother with flowers and a wide smile. "He was a big part of giving me something to really get up for," Hicks said Wednesday. My job "absolutely was, too, but on a very personal level, he was really what I needed, and me for him, too. " Hicks, executive director of Urban Promise, an award-winning youth services powerhouse in Camden with two private schools, after-school programs, and leadership, job-training, scholarship, and mentoring initiatives, became the 26th recipient of the New Jersey Heroes award and the first from Camden County.
NEWS
March 8, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Bernard J. Goodheart, 83, of East Falls, the judge who played Cupid to hundreds of couples by marrying them in his City Hall courtroom on Valentine's Day, died Tuesday, March 4, of cancer at his home. Judge Goodheart became famous for the tradition he started quite by accident soon after taking the Common Pleas Court bench. On Feb. 14, 1977, a confused couple wandered into his courtroom asking for a judge to help them tie the knot. His tipstaff turned them away; the judge was busy with a jury trial.
NEWS
March 6, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
George E. Moore, 67, of Northern Liberties, longtime legal counsel for Temple University, died Sunday, March 2, of cancer at his home. Mr. Moore had been Temple's attorney since 1989 and secretary to the school's board of trustees since 1992. He was appointed senior vice president in 2007. Mr. Moore oversaw all of the legal affairs of the university and its subsidiaries. He advised officials on corporate governance, policy development, employment, and labor issues. "Simply put, George's dedication to Temple was without equal.
NEWS
March 2, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Judith Goldstein Joseph, 70, a former Philadelphia lawyer who worked to help victims of domestic abuse, died Friday, Feb. 21, from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis at her home in North Hero, Vt. The Philadelphia native was a graduate of the University of Pennsylvania. She earned a master's degree in library science from Drexel University and a law degree from Rutgers School of Law. She worked as a librarian at the Library of Congress and then La Salle University. After graduating from law school, she joined her husband, lawyer Ben W. Joseph, in private practice in Philadelphia.
NEWS
February 21, 2014 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
CAMDEN Wendell Pritchett, the outgoing chancellor of Rutgers-Camden, will join the University of Pennsylvania Law School on July 1, Penn announced Wednesday morning. He previously had said he planned to take a one-year sabbatical and turn to teaching full-time at Rutgers-Camden. Pritchett, 49, steps down as chancellor at the end of June. The new position will be familiar to him. Pritchett, who holds a Ph.D. degree in history from Penn, taught at the law school from 2001 to 2009. He was an associate dean between 2006 and 2008.
NEWS
February 7, 2014 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Philadelphia-based partner at the law firm Dechert L.L.P. became the Obama administration's latest nominee to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit on Wednesday. If confirmed by the Senate, Cheryl Ann Krause, 46, will fill one of two vacancies on the court, which hears appeals from Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Delaware, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. "Cheryl Ann Krause has displayed exceptional dedication to the legal profession through her work, and I am honored to nominate her," President Obama said in a statement.
BUSINESS
February 6, 2014 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
Michael A. Fitts, dean of the University of Pennsylvania law school since 2000, has been named president of Tulane University in New Orleans and will take over there July 1. Penn made the announcement late Tuesday afternoon, praising Fitts' leadership of the law school during a time of significant academic change. "Mike Fitts is an inspired choice to become the next president of Tulane University," Penn president Amy Gutmann said. "He is a skilled and strategic leader whose vision has propelled Penn Law to ever greater heights.
NEWS
February 4, 2014 | BY STEPHANIE FARR, Daily News Staff Writer farrs@phillynews.com, 215-854-4225
SOME GRANDFATHERS build tree houses. Samantha Brown's grandfather built her family a fortress. Growing up in her grandparents' home in the low-rise section of the Norman Blumberg Apartments projects in North Philadelphia, Brown watched her relatives do all they could to protect her from the drug dealers and violence that plagued the area. For her grandfather, that meant building an enclosure around the front porch so the family could exist there in peace. "He wanted us to be able to just sit on the porch and not worry about any nonsense," Brown said.
NEWS
January 30, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Allen J. Beckman, 70, of Philadelphia, a personal injury lawyer and adviser to Pennsylvania politicians for many years, died Wednesday, Jan. 22, of heart failure at Penn Hospice at Rittenhouse. Mr. Beckman was campaign manager, finance chairman, Election Day coordinator, and adviser to candidates for federal, state, and local office. Those included former Mayor William J. Green III, former Mayor and Gov. Ed Rendell, City Councilwoman Marian B. Tasco, and the late U.S. Rep. William H. Gray III. An expert in maritime and medical malpractice law, Mr. Beckman worked for 35 years from Center City.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|