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Law Degree

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NEWS
May 28, 2004 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Richard Turkington, 63, of Collegeville, a Villanova University law professor for 27 years who was a leading expert on the First Amendment and privacy laws, died of cancer May 20 at home. "He was a pioneer in the area," said John Decker, a professor at DePaul University Law School in Chicago and a friend. "Nobody dealt as deeply or comprehensively with the issue of privacy as he did. " Professor Turkington wrote Teacher's Manual for Privacy and was contributing editor to AIDS, A Medical-Legal Handbook and AIDS, Law and Society.
BUSINESS
March 4, 2013 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
Is a two-year law degree the answer to soaring tuition costs and an anemic job market for many law school graduates? The idea is gaining traction among some academics and law firm leaders who say it has potential to reduce tuition-debt burdens while enabling law firms to hire first-year lawyers at lower salaries and reduce charges to clients. "I think you can learn more [by spending] a third year in a law firm than you can in the third year of law school," said Sheldon Bonovitz, the former chairman of Center City's Duane Morris L.L.P.
NEWS
July 11, 1997 | By Ralph Vigoda, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Finish college and get your law degree - in just six years! That is the promise held out to students at Pennsylvania's 14 state-run universities, under a new partnership between the public State System of Higher Education and Widener University, a private institution. The 3+3 Early Admission Program, announced yesterday, gives qualified students the option to leave undergraduate studies after three years to enter the Widener School of Law in Harrisburg. The first year of law school would also satisfy credit requirements for a bachelor's degree.
NEWS
June 15, 1998 | By Rachel Scheier, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Every evening for 12 years, Emily Ryan neatly arranged her children around the dining-room table and served dinner precisely at 5, just as her husband arrived from the office. She shepherded her five sons and daughters to and from school and afternoon sports. She volunteered as a home-room mother, participated in scouting, and sewed doll clothes. Then one Saturday, she woke up and found a lump in her breast. "I just assumed I was going to die," recalled Ryan, whose sister had succumbed to breast cancer just months earlier.
NEWS
December 6, 2012 | By Kathleen Tinney, Inquirer Staff Writer
Adam Mitchell Beloff, 48, of Philadelphia, a Common Pleas Court judge in his first term, died of an apparent suicide Saturday, Dec. 1, at his Jersey Shore home in Ventnor. Since his election three years ago, Judge Beloff had established himself as a hard worker who defied the usual learning curve for new jurists, said President Judge Pamela Pryor Dembe. "Lawyers went out of their way to tell me that he was doing a terrific job," she said. He frequently volunteered for judicial projects beyond his duties in the criminal division.
NEWS
May 3, 2013
JUDGE KENNETH Powell, a judge who has never been elected a judge, wants to be elected May 21, but he has some handicaps. He likes to wear bow ties, and he's a Republican with a bad ballot position. He can ditch the bow ties during the campaign for a seat on the Court of Common Pleas (political insiders warn him voters don't like them), but he can't change his party or ballot position. He's No. 3 on the GOP line, but that hardly matters in Philly, where Dems enjoy a 6 ½-to-1 registration edge.
NEWS
May 6, 2015 | Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
If mayoral elections were determined by the heft of a candidate's resumé, Nelson A. Diaz might advance from long-shot to front-runner. He was Philadelphia's youngest and first Latino judge. He was city solicitor. He has had big private-sector responsibilities. A child of Harlem, he grew up to help set federal housing policy. He served two presidents. On the campaign trail, he repeats his accomplishments over and over in the hope voters will see them as evidence of his fitness to run the city.
BUSINESS
February 23, 2015 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jim Drucker is living proof that a man not only can learn to appreciate some nagging from his wife, but also build a thriving, innovative company as a result of it. In Drucker's case, it is Norristown-based NewKadia.com, launched in 2000 and believed to be the only dedicated online comic-book dealer. Its inventory is 750,000; its average annual sales is 200,000 books, with profitability a constant since the second year. Revenue, Drucker said, is in the "low seven figures.
NEWS
October 25, 2007 | By Gayle Ronan Sims INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Benjamin Strauss, 71, the dashingly handsome scion and chairman of the Philadelphia-based Pep Boys auto-parts firm, known coast to coast for its timeless caricatures of Manny, Moe and Jack, died of prostate cancer Sunday at home in Haverford. The son of Maurice "Moe" Strauss, the ringleader of the original trio, Mr. Strauss joined Pep Boys in 1964 after practicing law in California. He was named president in 1975 and was chairman from 1978 until retiring in 1992. Mr. Strauss was not only successful in business, but he also was passionate about his family, the outdoors, philanthropy, the arts, and sports, particularly the Philadelphia Eagles.
NEWS
April 10, 2012 | By Sally Downey, For The Inquirer
Donald J. Goldberg, 81 of Rittenhouse Square, a trial lawyer in Philadelphia for 58 years, died of complications from cancer Saturday, April 7, at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. Since 1991, Mr. Goldberg had been special counsel in the litigation department of Ballard Spahr and was a member of the firm's white-collar investigations group. He previously had a solo practice in Center City for 30 years. "Partners and associates in the firm treasured any opportunity to learn from Don," Ballard Spahr chairman Mark Stewart said.
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BUSINESS
May 17, 2015 | Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
Reading Terminal Market on Friday named Anuj Gupta its general manager. The announcement was made by the market's board of directors after an extensive search process, Chairman Albert Mezzaroba said. "Anuj brings a rare blend of management success, not-for-profit leadership and vision at a consequential time in the market's history," Mezzaroba said. Gupta, 41, takes over the position that has been vacant since Paul Steinke stepped down on Dec. 31, 2014 to run for an at-large City Council seat.
NEWS
May 6, 2015 | Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
If mayoral elections were determined by the heft of a candidate's resumé, Nelson A. Diaz might advance from long-shot to front-runner. He was Philadelphia's youngest and first Latino judge. He was city solicitor. He has had big private-sector responsibilities. A child of Harlem, he grew up to help set federal housing policy. He served two presidents. On the campaign trail, he repeats his accomplishments over and over in the hope voters will see them as evidence of his fitness to run the city.
NEWS
May 1, 2015
THIS WEEK, the Supreme Court voted to uphold a Florida rule prohibiting judicial candidates from personally seeking campaign contributions. The court affirmed that those running for judge in Florida can't directly solicit money - but can write thank-you notes to donors. The ruling was especially welcome given the Court's recent history of decisions that support money's increasing influence in elections starting with, but not limited to, Citizens United. That decision opened the floodgates of independent political expenditures - including "dark money" - from corporations, unions and other organizations.
NEWS
April 28, 2015
IF YOU THINK (at all) about Philly state lawmakers, what comes to mind? Take a minute. Take two. Not much positive, right? Well, without getting any hopes up, meet freshman Philly state Sen. Art Haywood. He is, by any measure, apart from the pack, separate from the stream of sameness the city tends to send to Harrisburg. He did not come up through Democratic City Committee. He did not work for a politician. Most ward leaders didn't support him in last year's primary.
BUSINESS
March 7, 2015 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
A $10 million gift from the W.P. Carey Foundation to endow a joint law and M.B.A. degree program was announced Thursday by the University of Pennsylvania. Students in the program graduate with law and master of business administration degrees, attending both the university's law school and Wharton, its business school. The foundation was established by William Polk Carey, a Penn graduate and founder of W.P. Carey Inc., a real estate investment trust with global operations valued at more than $11 billion.
NEWS
March 5, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Edward Lawrence "Larry" Hannaway, 70, of Haverford, a lawyer in Philadelphia for more than three decades, died Tuesday, Feb. 24, of complications from prostate cancer at the Quadrangle in Haverford. Born in Manchester, N.H., he earned a bachelor of science degree from Villanova University in 1966. Mr. Hannaway was awarded a law degree with honor from George Washington University Law School in 1971. He stayed on as a lecturer at George Washington and earned his master's degree in the areas of law and psychiatry in 1974.
BUSINESS
February 24, 2015 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Lots of companies mount ambitious programs to hire college graduates, but the Graham Co., an insurance and risk-management company, takes a different approach. "As a rule, we don't hire right out of college," said Kenneth L. Ewell, 57, Graham's president and chief operating officer. Question: Why did Graham adopt that philosophy? Answer: You just have a higher degree of success [if] they've worked someplace else, and they have a little bit of context and they have some basis to judge Graham against.
BUSINESS
February 23, 2015 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jim Drucker is living proof that a man not only can learn to appreciate some nagging from his wife, but also build a thriving, innovative company as a result of it. In Drucker's case, it is Norristown-based NewKadia.com, launched in 2000 and believed to be the only dedicated online comic-book dealer. Its inventory is 750,000; its average annual sales is 200,000 books, with profitability a constant since the second year. Revenue, Drucker said, is in the "low seven figures.
SPORTS
February 14, 2015 | By Rich Fisher, For The Inquirer
For years when she was a child, Cozette McAvoy would ask her mom for a pony. One day years later it hit her that, hey, a high-powered corporate lawyer can buy her own horse. Since that revelation, McAvoy has become an owner, trainer and breeder of harness racing horses. She even shoes her own horses. And while many lawyers own horses, it's not as common to find ones who train and shoe them. "I don't really know any other attorneys that do this," said McAvoy, a Coatesville resident who received her undergraduate degree from West Chester, a master's from Lehigh, and law degree from the University of Georgia.
NEWS
January 16, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Joan Markman, 57, of Center City, Philadelphia's first chief integrity officer and a federal prosecutor for 20 years, died Wednesday, Jan. 14. She had been undergoing treatment for cancer. On Jan. 17, 2014, Mayor Nutter announced the departure of Ms. Markman, who he said was contending with the side effects of chemotherapy for recurrent cancer. Ms. Markman's last day of city employment was Jan. 31 of that year. "We're devastated and deeply saddened at the news of the passing of our friend Joan Markman," Nutter said Wednesday night.
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