CollectionsLaw Degree
IN THE NEWS

Law Degree

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
May 28, 2004 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Richard Turkington, 63, of Collegeville, a Villanova University law professor for 27 years who was a leading expert on the First Amendment and privacy laws, died of cancer May 20 at home. "He was a pioneer in the area," said John Decker, a professor at DePaul University Law School in Chicago and a friend. "Nobody dealt as deeply or comprehensively with the issue of privacy as he did. " Professor Turkington wrote Teacher's Manual for Privacy and was contributing editor to AIDS, A Medical-Legal Handbook and AIDS, Law and Society.
BUSINESS
February 23, 2015 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jim Drucker is living proof that a man not only can learn to appreciate some nagging from his wife, but also build a thriving, innovative company as a result of it. In Drucker's case, it is Norristown-based NewKadia.com, launched in 2000 and believed to be the only dedicated online comic-book dealer. Its inventory is 750,000; its average annual sales is 200,000 books, with profitability a constant since the second year. Revenue, Drucker said, is in the "low seven figures.
BUSINESS
March 4, 2013 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
Is a two-year law degree the answer to soaring tuition costs and an anemic job market for many law school graduates? The idea is gaining traction among some academics and law firm leaders who say it has potential to reduce tuition-debt burdens while enabling law firms to hire first-year lawyers at lower salaries and reduce charges to clients. "I think you can learn more [by spending] a third year in a law firm than you can in the third year of law school," said Sheldon Bonovitz, the former chairman of Center City's Duane Morris L.L.P.
NEWS
July 11, 1997 | By Ralph Vigoda, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Finish college and get your law degree - in just six years! That is the promise held out to students at Pennsylvania's 14 state-run universities, under a new partnership between the public State System of Higher Education and Widener University, a private institution. The 3+3 Early Admission Program, announced yesterday, gives qualified students the option to leave undergraduate studies after three years to enter the Widener School of Law in Harrisburg. The first year of law school would also satisfy credit requirements for a bachelor's degree.
NEWS
June 15, 1998 | By Rachel Scheier, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Every evening for 12 years, Emily Ryan neatly arranged her children around the dining-room table and served dinner precisely at 5, just as her husband arrived from the office. She shepherded her five sons and daughters to and from school and afternoon sports. She volunteered as a home-room mother, participated in scouting, and sewed doll clothes. Then one Saturday, she woke up and found a lump in her breast. "I just assumed I was going to die," recalled Ryan, whose sister had succumbed to breast cancer just months earlier.
BUSINESS
February 24, 2015 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Lots of companies mount ambitious programs to hire college graduates, but the Graham Co., an insurance and risk-management company, takes a different approach. "As a rule, we don't hire right out of college," said Kenneth L. Ewell, 57, Graham's president and chief operating officer. Question: Why did Graham adopt that philosophy? Answer: You just have a higher degree of success [if] they've worked someplace else, and they have a little bit of context and they have some basis to judge Graham against.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 16, 2012 | By Kellie Patrick Gates, For The Inquirer
Hello there Debbie and Georgee met at Philadelphia's Central High School, and Debbie was soon nursing a crush. "He was interesting to talk to, and it didn't hurt that he is really cute," Debbie said. Georgee found Debbie attractive, but thought of her as his best friend. Sure, everyone was always telling him that Debbie liked him. Everyone was always telling Debbie that he liked her. "Neither of us believed anyone," Georgee said. They chalked it up to their friends' pushing the two Indian Americans to get together.
NEWS
December 6, 2012 | By Kathleen Tinney, Inquirer Staff Writer
Adam Mitchell Beloff, 48, of Philadelphia, a Common Pleas Court judge in his first term, died of an apparent suicide Saturday, Dec. 1, at his Jersey Shore home in Ventnor. Since his election three years ago, Judge Beloff had established himself as a hard worker who defied the usual learning curve for new jurists, said President Judge Pamela Pryor Dembe. "Lawyers went out of their way to tell me that he was doing a terrific job," she said. He frequently volunteered for judicial projects beyond his duties in the criminal division.
NEWS
October 25, 2007 | By Gayle Ronan Sims INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Benjamin Strauss, 71, the dashingly handsome scion and chairman of the Philadelphia-based Pep Boys auto-parts firm, known coast to coast for its timeless caricatures of Manny, Moe and Jack, died of prostate cancer Sunday at home in Haverford. The son of Maurice "Moe" Strauss, the ringleader of the original trio, Mr. Strauss joined Pep Boys in 1964 after practicing law in California. He was named president in 1975 and was chairman from 1978 until retiring in 1992. Mr. Strauss was not only successful in business, but he also was passionate about his family, the outdoors, philanthropy, the arts, and sports, particularly the Philadelphia Eagles.
NEWS
July 15, 2012 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
A U.S. district judge handed prison terms Friday to the founder of a Northwest Philadelphia charter school and its former chief executive for stealing $522,000 in taxpayer money to prop up a restaurant, a health-food store, and a private school they controlled, and for defrauding a bank. Hugh C. Clark, a lawyer who helped found New Media Technology Charter School and served for many years as its board president, was sentenced to 24 months in federal prison. Ina Walker, a career educator and the charter school's former chief executive officer, was sentenced to six months in prison.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
February 24, 2015 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Lots of companies mount ambitious programs to hire college graduates, but the Graham Co., an insurance and risk-management company, takes a different approach. "As a rule, we don't hire right out of college," said Kenneth L. Ewell, 57, Graham's president and chief operating officer. Question: Why did Graham adopt that philosophy? Answer: You just have a higher degree of success [if] they've worked someplace else, and they have a little bit of context and they have some basis to judge Graham against.
BUSINESS
February 23, 2015 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jim Drucker is living proof that a man not only can learn to appreciate some nagging from his wife, but also build a thriving, innovative company as a result of it. In Drucker's case, it is Norristown-based NewKadia.com, launched in 2000 and believed to be the only dedicated online comic-book dealer. Its inventory is 750,000; its average annual sales is 200,000 books, with profitability a constant since the second year. Revenue, Drucker said, is in the "low seven figures.
SPORTS
February 14, 2015 | By Rich Fisher, For The Inquirer
For years when she was a child, Cozette McAvoy would ask her mom for a pony. One day years later it hit her that, hey, a high-powered corporate lawyer can buy her own horse. Since that revelation, McAvoy has become an owner, trainer and breeder of harness racing horses. She even shoes her own horses. And while many lawyers own horses, it's not as common to find ones who train and shoe them. "I don't really know any other attorneys that do this," said McAvoy, a Coatesville resident who received her undergraduate degree from West Chester, a master's from Lehigh, and law degree from the University of Georgia.
NEWS
January 16, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Joan Markman, 57, of Center City, Philadelphia's first chief integrity officer and a federal prosecutor for 20 years, died Wednesday, Jan. 14. She had been undergoing treatment for cancer. On Jan. 17, 2014, Mayor Nutter announced the departure of Ms. Markman, who he said was contending with the side effects of chemotherapy for recurrent cancer. Ms. Markman's last day of city employment was Jan. 31 of that year. "We're devastated and deeply saddened at the news of the passing of our friend Joan Markman," Nutter said Wednesday night.
NEWS
January 2, 2015 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
Daniel M. Rendine, 105, a longtime Philadelphia lawyer and an avid golfer who once played in a twice-weekly foursome that included the pool legend Willie Mosconi and the newscaster Tom Snyder, died Monday, Dec. 29, of heart failure at Chestnut Hill Hospital. Mr. Rendine, who was the oldest man in attendance when the city honored more than 100 centenarians in June, attributed his longevity to moderation: "I won't turn down a drink, but I won't go overboard with a drink. " He served as an assistant city solicitor from 1942 to 1952 and as a special assistant deputy attorney general from 1960 to 1968.
NEWS
January 1, 2015 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
The daughter of Philadelphia's former fire commissioner is the latest - and youngest - candidate in next year's already crowded at-large race for City Council. Jenné Ayers, who turned 26 Tuesday, announced her bid in front of the Free Library's main library on Logan Square beside her father, Lloyd, who retired in June after nearly 10 years as commissioner and 40 as a firefighter. Jenné Ayers, a graduate of Masterman High School and Harvard University who is completing her law degree at Yale University, said she wanted to bring "a breath of fresh air" to Council.
NEWS
December 20, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Daniel Edward Beren, 85, formerly of Meadowbrook, a five-term state legislator from eastern Montgomery County in the 1960s and '70s, died Sunday, Dec. 14, of complications from an aortic aneurysm at the Woods at Cedar Run in Camp Hill. In 1967, Mr. Beren became an elected representative to Pennsylvania's General Assembly from the 153d District. He was reelected four times, and became known for his commitment to honest government, his family said. During his time in the legislature, Mr. Beren was assigned to these committees: Elections and Apportionment, Motor Vehicles and Highway Safety, Mines and Minerals, Consumer Protection, State Government, Transportation, and Urban Affairs.
NEWS
December 1, 2014 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
After nearly a decade of haranguing Philadelphia government officials on issues of ethics and transparency, the policy director and interim president of the watchdog group Committee of Seventy is stepping down. But not without speaking her mind. Ellen Mattleman Kaplan, 60, a Philadelphia-area native who lives in Chestnut Hill, has no plans yet for what she will do next, other than visit her former boss, Zack Stalberg, who recently moved to New Mexico after stepping down as president of the committee.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|