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Law Degree

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NEWS
May 28, 2004 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Richard Turkington, 63, of Collegeville, a Villanova University law professor for 27 years who was a leading expert on the First Amendment and privacy laws, died of cancer May 20 at home. "He was a pioneer in the area," said John Decker, a professor at DePaul University Law School in Chicago and a friend. "Nobody dealt as deeply or comprehensively with the issue of privacy as he did. " Professor Turkington wrote Teacher's Manual for Privacy and was contributing editor to AIDS, A Medical-Legal Handbook and AIDS, Law and Society.
BUSINESS
March 4, 2013 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
Is a two-year law degree the answer to soaring tuition costs and an anemic job market for many law school graduates? The idea is gaining traction among some academics and law firm leaders who say it has potential to reduce tuition-debt burdens while enabling law firms to hire first-year lawyers at lower salaries and reduce charges to clients. "I think you can learn more [by spending] a third year in a law firm than you can in the third year of law school," said Sheldon Bonovitz, the former chairman of Center City's Duane Morris L.L.P.
NEWS
July 11, 1997 | By Ralph Vigoda, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Finish college and get your law degree - in just six years! That is the promise held out to students at Pennsylvania's 14 state-run universities, under a new partnership between the public State System of Higher Education and Widener University, a private institution. The 3+3 Early Admission Program, announced yesterday, gives qualified students the option to leave undergraduate studies after three years to enter the Widener School of Law in Harrisburg. The first year of law school would also satisfy credit requirements for a bachelor's degree.
NEWS
June 15, 1998 | By Rachel Scheier, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Every evening for 12 years, Emily Ryan neatly arranged her children around the dining-room table and served dinner precisely at 5, just as her husband arrived from the office. She shepherded her five sons and daughters to and from school and afternoon sports. She volunteered as a home-room mother, participated in scouting, and sewed doll clothes. Then one Saturday, she woke up and found a lump in her breast. "I just assumed I was going to die," recalled Ryan, whose sister had succumbed to breast cancer just months earlier.
NEWS
June 26, 2014 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
Among the six South Jersey lawyers Gov. Christie has nominated for Superior Court judgeships is a former high school Spanish teacher at Camden Catholic High School who went on to work as a deputy attorney general and later ran for Congress. The nominees, announced last week, now must be confirmed by the state Senate. Though they live in Burlington and Camden Counties, they could be assigned to serve their terms anywhere in the state once they are approved. The nominees are: David M. Ragonese of Haddon Heights; Gerard H. Breland of Burlington Township; Daniel A. Bernardin and Morris G. Smith of Collingswood; Sherri L. Schweitzer of Cherry Hill; and Mark P. Tarantino of Moorestown.
NEWS
July 15, 2012 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
A U.S. district judge handed prison terms Friday to the founder of a Northwest Philadelphia charter school and its former chief executive for stealing $522,000 in taxpayer money to prop up a restaurant, a health-food store, and a private school they controlled, and for defrauding a bank. Hugh C. Clark, a lawyer who helped found New Media Technology Charter School and served for many years as its board president, was sentenced to 24 months in federal prison. Ina Walker, a career educator and the charter school's former chief executive officer, was sentenced to six months in prison.
NEWS
December 24, 2015 | By Chris Mondics, Staff Writer
Arlin M. Adams, 94, of Elkins Park, a former judge on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit and a leading figure in the Philadelphia legal community for much of his life, died at his home early Tuesday. During many decades as a respected federal appellate judge, litigator, and, at times, political operative, Judge Adams was frequently in close contact with state and national leaders. Three presidents considered nominating him for a seat on the U.S. Supreme Court. For a time in the late 1960s, Judge Adams was a political ally of President Richard M. Nixon, who put him on a short list for the Supreme Court, a seat that eventually went to now-retired Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist.
NEWS
December 23, 2015 | By Jan Hefler, Staff Writer
Aimee Belgard, a rarity as a Democrat who served on the Republican-dominated Burlington County Freeholder Board, has been sworn in as a state Superior Court judge. She was assigned to handle small claims and landlord-tenant cases in Mount Holly beginning Tuesday. Belgard, who was a trial lawyer for 14 years, lost her bid for reelection to a second three-year term on the board in a close race last month. Last year, she ran for a congressional seat in a hotly contested race to represent South Jersey's Third District.
NEWS
October 25, 2007 | By Gayle Ronan Sims INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Benjamin Strauss, 71, the dashingly handsome scion and chairman of the Philadelphia-based Pep Boys auto-parts firm, known coast to coast for its timeless caricatures of Manny, Moe and Jack, died of prostate cancer Sunday at home in Haverford. The son of Maurice "Moe" Strauss, the ringleader of the original trio, Mr. Strauss joined Pep Boys in 1964 after practicing law in California. He was named president in 1975 and was chairman from 1978 until retiring in 1992. Mr. Strauss was not only successful in business, but he also was passionate about his family, the outdoors, philanthropy, the arts, and sports, particularly the Philadelphia Eagles.
NEWS
October 24, 2015 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
By all accounts, Theodore Milton Selden was headed for greatness. He graduated first in his class from the historically black Lincoln University and summa cum laude from Dartmouth College, earning two bachelor's degrees and admission to the exclusive Phi Beta Kappa honor society. Selden enrolled at the University of Pennsylvania Law School and was among the first African Americans to attend the prestigious school. Then came the July day in 1922 that ended everything. The 23-year-old, who had been working as a Pullman porter while attending school, was aboard a midnight train from Philadelphia to Atlantic City that derailed about halfway.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 21, 2016 | By Allison Steele, Staff Writer
When Iveliz Crespo was a child growing up in East Camden, many of her neighbors were undocumented immigrants who faced discrimination. Some struggled with learning English or had bosses who cheated them out of earnings because they believed undocumented workers wouldn't report problems. Those stories inspired Crespo, who was raised by a single mother who came to New Jersey from Puerto Rico as a young adult. She decided early on that she wanted to help people like the immigrants in her Cramer Hill neighborhood.
SPORTS
December 28, 2015 | By Rick O'Brien, Staff Writer
Brandon McIlwain drew national attention even before his high school career. As an eighth-grader at Newtown Middle School, he threw a football 56 yards. "He's going to be a good one down the line," Council Rock North coach Adam Collachi said at the time. That turned out to be quite an understatement. As a four-year starter for the Indians, the incredibly dynamic quarterback accounted for 10,427 yards and 124 touchdowns on offense. Quick-footed, elusive, and poised, McIlwain threw for 6,545 yards and 54 TDs. He also rushed for 3,882 yards and 70 touchdowns.
NEWS
December 24, 2015 | By Chris Mondics, Staff Writer
Arlin M. Adams, 94, of Elkins Park, a former judge on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit and a leading figure in the Philadelphia legal community for much of his life, died at his home early Tuesday. During many decades as a respected federal appellate judge, litigator, and, at times, political operative, Judge Adams was frequently in close contact with state and national leaders. Three presidents considered nominating him for a seat on the U.S. Supreme Court. For a time in the late 1960s, Judge Adams was a political ally of President Richard M. Nixon, who put him on a short list for the Supreme Court, a seat that eventually went to now-retired Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist.
NEWS
December 23, 2015 | By Jan Hefler, Staff Writer
Aimee Belgard, a rarity as a Democrat who served on the Republican-dominated Burlington County Freeholder Board, has been sworn in as a state Superior Court judge. She was assigned to handle small claims and landlord-tenant cases in Mount Holly beginning Tuesday. Belgard, who was a trial lawyer for 14 years, lost her bid for reelection to a second three-year term on the board in a close race last month. Last year, she ran for a congressional seat in a hotly contested race to represent South Jersey's Third District.
NEWS
December 12, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jay Michael Starr, 68, of Merion, a lawyer, financier, teacher, and artist, died Sunday, Dec. 6, of complications from cancer at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. Mr. Starr was one of a handful of "Renaissance men in an age of the specialist," his close friend Michael E. Ussery said. Ussery is a former U.S. ambassador to Morocco. Mr. Starr was born in Quincy, Mass., the son of Irving Starr, one of the nation's longest-serving university deans, and Irene Godgart, a travel agent and artist.
NEWS
October 24, 2015 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
By all accounts, Theodore Milton Selden was headed for greatness. He graduated first in his class from the historically black Lincoln University and summa cum laude from Dartmouth College, earning two bachelor's degrees and admission to the exclusive Phi Beta Kappa honor society. Selden enrolled at the University of Pennsylvania Law School and was among the first African Americans to attend the prestigious school. Then came the July day in 1922 that ended everything. The 23-year-old, who had been working as a Pullman porter while attending school, was aboard a midnight train from Philadelphia to Atlantic City that derailed about halfway.
NEWS
October 23, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Owen A. Knopping, 75, of Bryn Mawr, a tax lawyer in Philadelphia for 45 years, died Tuesday, Oct. 20, of pancreatic cancer at home. Mr. Knopping was a partner in the Philadelphia law firm of Fox Rothschild, where he served as cochair of the federal tax controversy and litigation practice group. He represented clients in civil and criminal cases before the IRS, the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, the City of Philadelphia, and other taxation bodies. Roy Neff, a friend of 30 years, said Mr. Knopping had the perfect temperament for such work: He was smart and gentle, and could make friends with anyone - even IRS auditors.
NEWS
August 15, 2015 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
In some circles, Washington law professor Edgar S. Cahn, 80, is a social justice icon and poverty law pioneer whose many accomplishments changed the legal landscape. "The people who know him think he's a saint, but far too few people know him," said Martin Friedman, executive director of EducationWorks. Friedman and his local nonprofit, which runs after-school and social-justice programs in Philadelphia, Chester, and Camden, wants to change that. It hopes to increase Cahn's public profile in the region by awarding him EducationWorks' inaugural Social Justice Award at the National Constitution Center gala on Sept.
NEWS
August 7, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
IT SEEMED as if Richard Johnson was always looking after society's underdogs. As a criminal-defense lawyer, his concern for his clients extended well beyond the courtroom. "He wanted to encourage his clients to turn their lives around," said his daughter, Diahnne. "He tried to show them there was a better way to live. " And when Richard worked for the Department of Health, Education and Welfare, one of his jobs was to make sure minority workers got a fair shake. Richard Ernest Johnson, who opened his own law office in Center City in the mid-'70s, a history and news junkie who devoured newspapers and magazines and kept up with TV news shows, and a devoted family patriarch, died of heart failure July 31. He was 89 and lived in Center City.
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