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Law Degree

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NEWS
May 28, 2004 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Richard Turkington, 63, of Collegeville, a Villanova University law professor for 27 years who was a leading expert on the First Amendment and privacy laws, died of cancer May 20 at home. "He was a pioneer in the area," said John Decker, a professor at DePaul University Law School in Chicago and a friend. "Nobody dealt as deeply or comprehensively with the issue of privacy as he did. " Professor Turkington wrote Teacher's Manual for Privacy and was contributing editor to AIDS, A Medical-Legal Handbook and AIDS, Law and Society.
BUSINESS
March 4, 2013 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
Is a two-year law degree the answer to soaring tuition costs and an anemic job market for many law school graduates? The idea is gaining traction among some academics and law firm leaders who say it has potential to reduce tuition-debt burdens while enabling law firms to hire first-year lawyers at lower salaries and reduce charges to clients. "I think you can learn more [by spending] a third year in a law firm than you can in the third year of law school," said Sheldon Bonovitz, the former chairman of Center City's Duane Morris L.L.P.
NEWS
July 11, 1997 | By Ralph Vigoda, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Finish college and get your law degree - in just six years! That is the promise held out to students at Pennsylvania's 14 state-run universities, under a new partnership between the public State System of Higher Education and Widener University, a private institution. The 3+3 Early Admission Program, announced yesterday, gives qualified students the option to leave undergraduate studies after three years to enter the Widener School of Law in Harrisburg. The first year of law school would also satisfy credit requirements for a bachelor's degree.
NEWS
June 15, 1998 | By Rachel Scheier, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Every evening for 12 years, Emily Ryan neatly arranged her children around the dining-room table and served dinner precisely at 5, just as her husband arrived from the office. She shepherded her five sons and daughters to and from school and afternoon sports. She volunteered as a home-room mother, participated in scouting, and sewed doll clothes. Then one Saturday, she woke up and found a lump in her breast. "I just assumed I was going to die," recalled Ryan, whose sister had succumbed to breast cancer just months earlier.
NEWS
August 15, 2015 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
In some circles, Washington law professor Edgar S. Cahn, 80, is a social justice icon and poverty law pioneer whose many accomplishments changed the legal landscape. "The people who know him think he's a saint, but far too few people know him," said Martin Friedman, executive director of EducationWorks. Friedman and his local nonprofit, which runs after-school and social-justice programs in Philadelphia, Chester, and Camden, wants to change that. It hopes to increase Cahn's public profile in the region by awarding him EducationWorks' inaugural Social Justice Award at the National Constitution Center gala on Sept.
BUSINESS
February 23, 2015 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jim Drucker is living proof that a man not only can learn to appreciate some nagging from his wife, but also build a thriving, innovative company as a result of it. In Drucker's case, it is Norristown-based NewKadia.com, launched in 2000 and believed to be the only dedicated online comic-book dealer. Its inventory is 750,000; its average annual sales is 200,000 books, with profitability a constant since the second year. Revenue, Drucker said, is in the "low seven figures.
NEWS
March 4, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mark Willcox Jr., 99, of Glen Mills, a lawyer whose ancestors made currency for the Second Continental Congress at the family's Ivy Mills in Delaware County, died Monday, Feb. 18, of a heart attack in the Neighborhood Hospice in West Chester. Born in Wawa, Delaware County, to Margaret Keating and Mark Willcox Sr., Mr. Willcox was a seventh-generation descendant of Thomas Willcox, owner of one of the oldest paper mills in the United States. In 1775, as the congress prepared for the war against Britain, Benjamin Franklin was asked to provide financing, so he called on his friend Willcox.
NEWS
October 25, 2007 | By Gayle Ronan Sims INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Benjamin Strauss, 71, the dashingly handsome scion and chairman of the Philadelphia-based Pep Boys auto-parts firm, known coast to coast for its timeless caricatures of Manny, Moe and Jack, died of prostate cancer Sunday at home in Haverford. The son of Maurice "Moe" Strauss, the ringleader of the original trio, Mr. Strauss joined Pep Boys in 1964 after practicing law in California. He was named president in 1975 and was chairman from 1978 until retiring in 1992. Mr. Strauss was not only successful in business, but he also was passionate about his family, the outdoors, philanthropy, the arts, and sports, particularly the Philadelphia Eagles.
NEWS
June 26, 2014 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
Among the six South Jersey lawyers Gov. Christie has nominated for Superior Court judgeships is a former high school Spanish teacher at Camden Catholic High School who went on to work as a deputy attorney general and later ran for Congress. The nominees, announced last week, now must be confirmed by the state Senate. Though they live in Burlington and Camden Counties, they could be assigned to serve their terms anywhere in the state once they are approved. The nominees are: David M. Ragonese of Haddon Heights; Gerard H. Breland of Burlington Township; Daniel A. Bernardin and Morris G. Smith of Collingswood; Sherri L. Schweitzer of Cherry Hill; and Mark P. Tarantino of Moorestown.
BUSINESS
February 24, 2015 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Lots of companies mount ambitious programs to hire college graduates, but the Graham Co., an insurance and risk-management company, takes a different approach. "As a rule, we don't hire right out of college," said Kenneth L. Ewell, 57, Graham's president and chief operating officer. Question: Why did Graham adopt that philosophy? Answer: You just have a higher degree of success [if] they've worked someplace else, and they have a little bit of context and they have some basis to judge Graham against.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 15, 2015 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
In some circles, Washington law professor Edgar S. Cahn, 80, is a social justice icon and poverty law pioneer whose many accomplishments changed the legal landscape. "The people who know him think he's a saint, but far too few people know him," said Martin Friedman, executive director of EducationWorks. Friedman and his local nonprofit, which runs after-school and social-justice programs in Philadelphia, Chester, and Camden, wants to change that. It hopes to increase Cahn's public profile in the region by awarding him EducationWorks' inaugural Social Justice Award at the National Constitution Center gala on Sept.
NEWS
August 7, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
IT SEEMED as if Richard Johnson was always looking after society's underdogs. As a criminal-defense lawyer, his concern for his clients extended well beyond the courtroom. "He wanted to encourage his clients to turn their lives around," said his daughter, Diahnne. "He tried to show them there was a better way to live. " And when Richard worked for the Department of Health, Education and Welfare, one of his jobs was to make sure minority workers got a fair shake. Richard Ernest Johnson, who opened his own law office in Center City in the mid-'70s, a history and news junkie who devoured newspapers and magazines and kept up with TV news shows, and a devoted family patriarch, died of heart failure July 31. He was 89 and lived in Center City.
NEWS
July 28, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mary Ann Mellon Melchiorre, 79, of Ardmore, a mother, lawyer, and brokerage firm officer, died Thursday, July 16, of complications from dementia at Saunders House in Wynnewood. Born in Philadelphia, she was the daughter of Lawrence J. and Kathryn Pizzagno Mellon. Ms. Melchiorre grew up in Colwyn and graduated from West Catholic High School. She went to work for the former Bell Telephone Co. of Pennsylvania, where she met Joseph Melchiorre. The two married and moved to Ardmore to raise a family.
NEWS
June 27, 2015 | By Erin Edinger-Turoff, Inquirer Staff Writer
Oscar Solomon Bortner, 94, a former Bucks County prosecutor and Common Pleas Court judge, died of natural causes Wednesday, June 24, in his Langhorne home. Mr. Bortner grew up in Philadelphia, where he completed his undergraduate studies at Temple University. After enlisting in the Army in 1943 as a weaponry technician, he completed a law degree at University of Pennsylvania Law School in 1949. His daughter Amy Gialuco remembers her father's time as an amateur actor when she was young.
FOOD
June 26, 2015 | By Danya Henninger, For The Inquirer
Just two years after hawking his first slabs of home-cured bacon at the Lansdowne Farmers Market, Ari Miller is preparing to take his artisanal charcuterie nationwide. 1732 Meats, his new, 4,000- square-foot plant in Yeadon, recently received USDA certification and began production. Miller is hoping for the same reception around the country that he's gotten from local chefs for his high-quality, sustainably raised salumi. "The quality of Ari's product is unmatched as far as domestic salumi is concerned," said Joe Cicala, chef and partner at East Passyunk's Le Virtu and Brigantessa.
NEWS
May 22, 2015
THIS WEEK marks the 50th anniversary of the creation of Head Start, a comprehensive early childhood education program that opens windows of opportunity for our nation's at-risk children and families. I know firsthand the incredible difference the program is making in the lives of millions of children and their families, because I was a Head Start kid. My family faced difficult economic times in my early childhood years. My parents were loving, supportive and cared deeply about my brother and me, but struggled to make ends meet.
NEWS
May 21, 2015 | BY STEPHANIE FARR, Daily News Staff Writer farrs@phillynews.com, 215-854-4225
IN A SPECIAL election held yesterday that coincided with the primaries, voters chose state Rep. John Sabatina Jr., a Democrat, to fill the state Senate seat for Philadelphia's 5th District that was vacated when Mike Stack resigned in January to take his current position as lieutenant governor. Given that it was a special election, all registered voters within the 5th District in Northeast Philadelphia were able to vote, regardless of party affiliation. Sabatina received more than 75 percent of the votes, easily beating out his Republican challenger, Tim Dailey, a high-school teacher.
BUSINESS
May 17, 2015 | Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
Reading Terminal Market on Friday named Anuj Gupta its general manager. The announcement was made by the market's board of directors after an extensive search process, Chairman Albert Mezzaroba said. "Anuj brings a rare blend of management success, not-for-profit leadership and vision at a consequential time in the market's history," Mezzaroba said. Gupta, 41, takes over the position that has been vacant since Paul Steinke stepped down on Dec. 31, 2014 to run for an at-large City Council seat.
NEWS
May 6, 2015 | Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
If mayoral elections were determined by the heft of a candidate's resumé, Nelson A. Diaz might advance from long-shot to front-runner. He was Philadelphia's youngest and first Latino judge. He was city solicitor. He has had big private-sector responsibilities. A child of Harlem, he grew up to help set federal housing policy. He served two presidents. On the campaign trail, he repeats his accomplishments over and over in the hope voters will see them as evidence of his fitness to run the city.
NEWS
May 1, 2015
THIS WEEK, the Supreme Court voted to uphold a Florida rule prohibiting judicial candidates from personally seeking campaign contributions. The court affirmed that those running for judge in Florida can't directly solicit money - but can write thank-you notes to donors. The ruling was especially welcome given the Court's recent history of decisions that support money's increasing influence in elections starting with, but not limited to, Citizens United. That decision opened the floodgates of independent political expenditures - including "dark money" - from corporations, unions and other organizations.
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