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NEWS
October 10, 1998 | By Eddie Olsen, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
An audit announced yesterday by the state Attorney General's Office criticized the Gloucester County Prosecutor's Office for the aggressive manner in which it has spent more than $648,000 in forfeiture funds since Andrew N. Yurick took over as prosecutor 21 months ago. The audit did not say the funds were misspent but indicated that Yurick could have been more prudent in "prioritizing law-enforcement needs. " Yurick's spending - on items ranging from bulletproof raincoats to high-tech weapons - has been criticized by county and state officials, including State Sen. Raymond J. Zane (D., Gloucester)
NEWS
April 25, 1991 | By ANN RINALDI
America has just won an acknowledged, much-publicized war. And now we find ourselves losing another one. It is the real war, down the street. It is the war we can somehow never bring ourselves to officially declare, properly name, dedicate songs to, form support groups for or rightfully acknowledge. Now it announces itself in the person of Rodney King of Los Angeles, kicked and clubbed by a group of police officers in a glaring police brutality case that has filtered into our living rooms on the television like those beams of light from the spaceship in Close Encounters of the Third Kind.
NEWS
August 25, 1989 | By Kitty Caparella, Daily News Staff Writer
At least eight men founded the Junior Black Mafia in 1985, according to federal, state and local law enforcement sources, and street sources. They have been identified as: James Cole, 35, and his brother, Hayward Cole, 36, convicted drug traffickers who were enforcers in the 1970s for the old Black Mafia, police sources say. Some investigators believe the Coles, whom drug informants refer to as "The Big Bosses," continue to lead the...
NEWS
May 15, 1990 | By Robert J. Terry and Michael E. Ruane, Inquirer Staff Writers
Leroy "Bucky" Davis, a former amateur boxer who was the reputed head of the Junior Black Mafia's operations in Southwest Philadelphia, was shot to death early yesterday on the front porch of a JBM safe house in West Philadelphia, authorities said. Davis, 22, wearing a gold and diamond-studded necklace that said "Bucky," was struck four times from a fusillade of gunfire that left the street littered with shell casings and the white brick and stucco house on Creighton Street pocked by bullets.
NEWS
April 11, 1987 | By Michael B. Coakley, Inquirer Staff Writer
Within hours of the discovery of Salvatore Testa's murdered corpse trussed up by the side of a lonely South Jersey road on the morning of Sept. 14, 1984, the theory was on the minds and lips of law enforcement authorities who study the mob: Nicky Scarfo did it. Even given the bloody factional war that had enveloped the Philadelphia mob since the execution of longtime boss Angelo Bruno in March 1980, law enforcement officers viewed the Sal...
NEWS
April 26, 1987 | By Jim Haner, Special to The Inquirer
They were known by such menacing names as "Warlocks," "Pagans" and "Hell's Angels," and they once roamed the eastern seaboard in rumbling packs, their chopped Harley-Davidson motorcycles a source of crude fascination to many they encountered. But then the fascination ended. Stripped of their mystery by a series of coordinated federal, state and local investigations in the early 1980s, several "outlaw motorcycle gangs" were revealed to be that and more. From their ragtag beginnings, they had become highly organized criminal conspiracies whose primary stock in trade was illegal drugs and whose calling cards were violence and intimidation.
NEWS
October 26, 1995 | by Kitty Caparella and Marianne Costantinou, Daily News Staff Writers
The massive raid at Graterford state prison earlier this week grabbed the attention of the outside world, but the biggest show of force was the quiet, hurried transfer of a dozen inmates who wielded the real power inside the prison walls. More than the unprecedented raid by 650 state troopers and prison guards, more than the forced retirement of two top prison officials, more than the strip-searches of the 3,490 inmates and the cell-by-cell shakedown for drugs and weapons, the biggest symbol of change was the dethroning of the reputed leader of prison wheeling-and-dealing.
NEWS
August 7, 2005 | By Tom McGurk INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
There was a homicide in Gloucester County recently, but a new, energetic 20-student task force was on the case. The crime was a role-playing scenario, but the situation gave summer interns in the Gloucester County Prosecutor's Office an interesting and uncommon look into the vast world of law enforcement and the criminal justice system. The focus of the four-week program, which ended Friday, ranged from gaining clues and photographs at a crime scene to a criminal trial. Tours of county and federal jails and a mock grand-jury presentation were included.
NEWS
July 8, 2000 | by Kitty Caparella, Daily News Staff Writer
Divine Providence works in mysterious ways: Anthony "Mad Dog" DiPasquale died the way he lived - violently. The notorious mob extortionist who beat victims with bars, bottles and pipes until they paid up, smashed his car into a tree at 6:45 p.m. Thursday on Interstate 95 in Langhorne, Bucks County. State Trooper Kenneth Wong said DiPasquale, 59, of Washington Crossing, Bucks County, was "so mangled and totally crushed" that he was pronounced dead at the scene. DiPasquale was speeding and changing lanes in the northbound lane before losing control of his 2000 Hyundai north of Exit 29, said Wong, of the Trevose barracks.
NEWS
May 28, 2004
WE CAN see the executives for Coppertone dancing in their offices. A father has been indicted and charged for not putting enough sun-screen on his 12-year-old son. Can a bill outlawing going outside without slathering on a healthy dose of suntan lotion be far behind? Walter McKelvie, of Vineland, now faces 18-months in prison because, according to the indictment, he failed to "apply enough sunscreen causing severe sunburn to" his son, who is only identified as R.M. in court documents.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 17, 2015 | By Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writer
Attorney General Eric H. Holder Jr., chairing a Philadelphia roundtable on policing issues Thursday, told attendees not to waste the opportunity they had before them. "Too often, we have not approached these problems" - namely issues of trust between police officers and the communities they serve - "with the candor I'm seeking today," he said. Holder was on the fifth stop in a national listening tour in the wake of widespread nationwide protests against the deaths of unarmed African American men at the hands of white police officers in recent months.
NEWS
January 7, 2015 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mayor Nutter looked back on 2014 Monday, touting a drop in Philadelphia's crime rate but also acknowledging the delicate relationship between law enforcement and the community in a year when nationwide, tensions mounted. In a 20-minute news conference that offered a statistical report card of the year, Nutter praised law enforcement and in blunt terms cautioned citizens against provoking police. "If you shoot a police officer . . . they're going to shoot back; it's their job," Nutter said.
NEWS
January 1, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
The system failed mass murderer Bradley Stone's victims and everyone who cared about them. Montgomery County law enforcement officials should show more interest in finding out how. Police say that in just 90 minutes on Dec. 15, Stone killed his ex-wife and five of her relatives during a bloody rampage through Souderton, Lansdale, and Lower Salford. He used a handgun to shoot five of the victims and was also armed with an ax, a machete, and knives. The next day, he was found dead of a drug overdose in the woods near his Pennsburg home.
NEWS
December 31, 2014 | By Mari A. Schaefer, Inquirer Staff Writer
About a year ago, Philadelphia Police Chaplain Luis Centeno was approached by Stephen McWilliams, who teaches a social documentary film class at Villanova University. McWilliams was initially interested in profiling the chaplain, but as they talked, both began to see a more meaningful project - about a dark secret, one few law enforcement officers are willing to openly talk about. Suicide. The collaboration led to this to the release this fall of BLUE , a 40-minute documentary chronicling the occupational hazards of the job, and a related app to help officers identify and address the signs.
NEWS
December 19, 2014
LET ME BEGIN with a statement of fact. Editorial cartoons are not meant to be fair and they cannot hurt you. That said, they can, in the words of one of my ink-stained brethren, punctuate the conversation with satire, mockery and gross exaggeration, ridiculing and lampooning everything from pompous politicking to holier-than-thou hypocrisy. Nobody said it was pretty, but it is oh, so American. Cartoons are supposed to provoke thought, encourage speech and usher in change. And change cannot come soon enough.
NEWS
December 13, 2014 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
University of Pennsylvania president Amy Gutmann has become the second area college president in a week to face criticism for participating in "die-in" protests held by students. Gutmann lay on the floor with student protesters when they took over her holiday party Tuesday - their demonstration symbolizing the 41/2 hours that the body of Michael Brown, a black teenager, remained on the street after he was shot in August by a white police officer in Ferguson, Mo. Members of the Penn police force who were working at the party and witnessed Gutmann's participation were "outraged," said Eric Rohrback, president of the 116-member Penn police officers' union.
NEWS
December 5, 2014
IN AN OLD "Saturday Night Live" skit called "White Like Me," Eddie Murphy went undercover as a white person. The punch line: When blacks aren't around, white people behave differently, giving one another free stuff, including no-strings bank loans. The skit played on the idea that whites and blacks suspect one another of having tribal loyalties and behaviors that they keep secret from one another, and only bring out when they're in "safe" company. Murphy's bit was funny. Not so funny is the belief among some blacks that police are out to get them, and that white society thinks their lives are expendable.
BUSINESS
November 24, 2014 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Columnist
We love to toast the Internet as an amazing engine for connection, creativity, and growth. We rarely want to dwell on its darker side - the vast cyber-badlands where ne'er-do-wells freely roam. On the Web, you can get away with nearly anything if you have the technical skills to pull it off and the wiliness to stay ahead of the law. Just ask a Nigerian prince - or one of his sorry victims. But if it's the Wild West out there, here's reason for hope. Last week, a Texas company became one of the first reined in by frontier marshals armed with new authority out of Washington - though this time, Wyatt Earp was played by the Federal Trade Commission and state officials in Texas, Illinois, and Ohio.
NEWS
November 8, 2014 | By Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writer
The man charged with abducting a 22-year-old Germantown woman this week has arrived in Virginia to face charges in the earlier kidnapping of a 16-year-old girl. Federal prosecutors say Delvin Barnes, 37, violently abducted nursing assistant Carlesha Freeland-Gaither from a Germantown street Sunday and drove her to Maryland. After a frantic search that involved local and federal law enforcement from three states, Freeland-Gaither was found alive in Barnes' car in Jessup, Md., on Wednesday.
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