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NEWS
October 10, 1998 | By Eddie Olsen, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
An audit announced yesterday by the state Attorney General's Office criticized the Gloucester County Prosecutor's Office for the aggressive manner in which it has spent more than $648,000 in forfeiture funds since Andrew N. Yurick took over as prosecutor 21 months ago. The audit did not say the funds were misspent but indicated that Yurick could have been more prudent in "prioritizing law-enforcement needs. " Yurick's spending - on items ranging from bulletproof raincoats to high-tech weapons - has been criticized by county and state officials, including State Sen. Raymond J. Zane (D., Gloucester)
NEWS
April 25, 1991 | By ANN RINALDI
America has just won an acknowledged, much-publicized war. And now we find ourselves losing another one. It is the real war, down the street. It is the war we can somehow never bring ourselves to officially declare, properly name, dedicate songs to, form support groups for or rightfully acknowledge. Now it announces itself in the person of Rodney King of Los Angeles, kicked and clubbed by a group of police officers in a glaring police brutality case that has filtered into our living rooms on the television like those beams of light from the spaceship in Close Encounters of the Third Kind.
NEWS
August 25, 1989 | By Kitty Caparella, Daily News Staff Writer
At least eight men founded the Junior Black Mafia in 1985, according to federal, state and local law enforcement sources, and street sources. They have been identified as: James Cole, 35, and his brother, Hayward Cole, 36, convicted drug traffickers who were enforcers in the 1970s for the old Black Mafia, police sources say. Some investigators believe the Coles, whom drug informants refer to as "The Big Bosses," continue to lead the...
NEWS
May 15, 1990 | By Robert J. Terry and Michael E. Ruane, Inquirer Staff Writers
Leroy "Bucky" Davis, a former amateur boxer who was the reputed head of the Junior Black Mafia's operations in Southwest Philadelphia, was shot to death early yesterday on the front porch of a JBM safe house in West Philadelphia, authorities said. Davis, 22, wearing a gold and diamond-studded necklace that said "Bucky," was struck four times from a fusillade of gunfire that left the street littered with shell casings and the white brick and stucco house on Creighton Street pocked by bullets.
NEWS
April 11, 1987 | By Michael B. Coakley, Inquirer Staff Writer
Within hours of the discovery of Salvatore Testa's murdered corpse trussed up by the side of a lonely South Jersey road on the morning of Sept. 14, 1984, the theory was on the minds and lips of law enforcement authorities who study the mob: Nicky Scarfo did it. Even given the bloody factional war that had enveloped the Philadelphia mob since the execution of longtime boss Angelo Bruno in March 1980, law enforcement officers viewed the Sal...
NEWS
April 26, 1987 | By Jim Haner, Special to The Inquirer
They were known by such menacing names as "Warlocks," "Pagans" and "Hell's Angels," and they once roamed the eastern seaboard in rumbling packs, their chopped Harley-Davidson motorcycles a source of crude fascination to many they encountered. But then the fascination ended. Stripped of their mystery by a series of coordinated federal, state and local investigations in the early 1980s, several "outlaw motorcycle gangs" were revealed to be that and more. From their ragtag beginnings, they had become highly organized criminal conspiracies whose primary stock in trade was illegal drugs and whose calling cards were violence and intimidation.
NEWS
October 26, 1995 | by Kitty Caparella and Marianne Costantinou, Daily News Staff Writers
The massive raid at Graterford state prison earlier this week grabbed the attention of the outside world, but the biggest show of force was the quiet, hurried transfer of a dozen inmates who wielded the real power inside the prison walls. More than the unprecedented raid by 650 state troopers and prison guards, more than the forced retirement of two top prison officials, more than the strip-searches of the 3,490 inmates and the cell-by-cell shakedown for drugs and weapons, the biggest symbol of change was the dethroning of the reputed leader of prison wheeling-and-dealing.
NEWS
August 7, 2005 | By Tom McGurk INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
There was a homicide in Gloucester County recently, but a new, energetic 20-student task force was on the case. The crime was a role-playing scenario, but the situation gave summer interns in the Gloucester County Prosecutor's Office an interesting and uncommon look into the vast world of law enforcement and the criminal justice system. The focus of the four-week program, which ended Friday, ranged from gaining clues and photographs at a crime scene to a criminal trial. Tours of county and federal jails and a mock grand-jury presentation were included.
NEWS
July 8, 2000 | by Kitty Caparella, Daily News Staff Writer
Divine Providence works in mysterious ways: Anthony "Mad Dog" DiPasquale died the way he lived - violently. The notorious mob extortionist who beat victims with bars, bottles and pipes until they paid up, smashed his car into a tree at 6:45 p.m. Thursday on Interstate 95 in Langhorne, Bucks County. State Trooper Kenneth Wong said DiPasquale, 59, of Washington Crossing, Bucks County, was "so mangled and totally crushed" that he was pronounced dead at the scene. DiPasquale was speeding and changing lanes in the northbound lane before losing control of his 2000 Hyundai north of Exit 29, said Wong, of the Trevose barracks.
NEWS
May 28, 2004
WE CAN see the executives for Coppertone dancing in their offices. A father has been indicted and charged for not putting enough sun-screen on his 12-year-old son. Can a bill outlawing going outside without slathering on a healthy dose of suntan lotion be far behind? Walter McKelvie, of Vineland, now faces 18-months in prison because, according to the indictment, he failed to "apply enough sunscreen causing severe sunburn to" his son, who is only identified as R.M. in court documents.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 8, 2016 | By Barbara Boyer, Staff Writer
Days before they died, John and Joyce Sheridan were going about their normal routines. They took a weekend trip to check on their vacation home in Upstate New York. He prepared for a work meeting. She made plans to cook soup with a girlfriend. So why would 72-year-old John Sheridan, Cooper Health System's CEO, suddenly fill with "rage and passion," stab his wife, set their Montgomery Township home on fire, and then take his own life? It was a question posed to one of the Sheridans' sons by a Somerset County investigator seeking explanations for the gruesome and puzzling Sept.
NEWS
July 22, 2016 | By Michael Boren, STAFF WRITER
Bob Ossler's brain was fried. His body, crisped. The unforgiving sun of a Louisiana summer had drained him. The police chaplain from Millville, Cumberland County, had prayed with hundreds of law enforcement officials since he arrived Sunday in Baton Rouge, where a gunman had killed three officers in an ambush. But the fatigue didn't stop Ossler. When a group of officers waved him over Wednesday — where they came from he does not know; "I see badges and I pray" — he put his hands on their shoulders and read from Psalm 23. Even the toughest officers began choking up, he said.
NEWS
July 20, 2016 | By Laura McCrystal, Staff Writer
Andrea Constand did not break her confidential settlement agreement with Bill Cosby by cooperating with detectives in an investigation that led to criminal charges against the entertainer, a federal judge has ruled. The ruling, by District Judge Eduardo C. Robreno, dismissed portions of Cosby's bid to make Constand return the money he paid her a decade ago to settle sexual-assault claims. Cosby contended that the agreement prevented any party from disclosing details about the lawsuit or a 2005 criminal investigation into the allegations.
NEWS
July 20, 2016 | By Julie Shaw, Staff Writer
A national spokesman for the Moorish Science Temple of America said his religious group should not be confused with other Moorish groups that some news outlets have linked to Baton Rouge, La., police shooter Gavin Long. "Regarding the shooter in Baton Rouge, he has no affiliation or ties with the Moorish Science Temple of America," Azeem Hopkins-Bey, 36, grand sheik of the temple at 2559 N. Fifth St. in North Philadelphia, said at a news conference Monday outside City Hall. "In fact, his ideologies and his actions are diametrically opposed to [our]
NEWS
July 20, 2016
The Pennsylvania SPCA has named a new director of Humane Law Enforcement. Sgt. Nicole Wilson will immediately take over the role left vacant by the death last month of George Bengal, the shelter's longtime law enforcement director. The unit investigates reports of animal abuse and can charge individuals who mistreat animals with crimes. Wilson began her career in animal welfare in 1998 at the Humane Society of Washington County in Hagerstown, Md., where she established a behavior hotline to provide a resource for pet owners.
NEWS
July 18, 2016 | By Michael Smerconish
Charles Ramsey has law enforcement credentials that few can match. Only now, for the first time in more than 40 years, the former top cop for the District of Columbia and Philadelphia, and cochair of President Obama's Task Force on 21st Century Policing, finds himself advising from the sidelines. "I've been pretty busy," he told me, "but when things like this occur, of course I wish I was in the middle of it. But then there's another part of me that's probably glad I'm not in the middle of it. " Retirement hasn't diminished his willingness to address hot-button issues.
NEWS
July 16, 2016 | By Angela Couloumbis, HARRISBURG BUREAU
HARRISBURG - In the frenzy of finishing the state budget, slipping in a perk or two can become political blood sport. For legislators, that could be money for a pet project back home. For lobbyists, it could be language that exempts their client from some onerous regulation. For Lt. Gov. Mike Stack this year, it was flashing lights. Stack's office alerted legislators that the Philadelphia Democrat wanted law enforcement officers who chauffeur him and other "dignitaries" to have more flexibility in using the car's flashing lights to get to events, according to four legislative and administration aides familiar with the request.
NEWS
July 15, 2016 | By Michael Boren, Staff Writer
Lawmakers in New Jersey and Pennsylvania are introducing bills to classify attacks on police officers as hate crimes, and a civil-rights group warns that such measures could aggravate day-to-day interactions between police and communities, and worsen tensions. Drivers or pedestrians who believe they were stopped for no reason and got into a heated verbal dispute with an officer, for example, could be charged with a hate crime, depending on the circumstances of the stop and the words used.
NEWS
July 14, 2016 | By Emma Platoff, Staff Writer
Before they began following a controversial new student misconduct policy late this spring, Collingswood school officials called local police 32 times over nine months. That figure stands in contrast to the 22 incidents reported after May 25, when the school district contacted law enforcement for nearly every incident of student misbehavior. More than half of the calls between Sept. 3 and May 25 came from Collingswood High School, where incidents ranged from cellphone and bicycle thefts to marijuana possession, according to police incident reports obtained by the Inquirer on Tuesday.
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