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NEWS
July 15, 2016 | By Michael Boren, Staff Writer
Lawmakers in New Jersey and Pennsylvania are introducing bills to classify attacks on police officers as hate crimes, and a civil-rights group warns that such measures could aggravate day-to-day interactions between police and communities, and worsen tensions. Drivers or pedestrians who believe they were stopped for no reason and got into a heated verbal dispute with an officer, for example, could be charged with a hate crime, depending on the circumstances of the stop and the words used.
NEWS
July 14, 2016 | By Emma Platoff, Staff Writer
Before they began following a controversial new student misconduct policy late this spring, Collingswood school officials called local police 32 times over nine months. That figure stands in contrast to the 22 incidents reported after May 25, when the school district contacted law enforcement for nearly every incident of student misbehavior. More than half of the calls between Sept. 3 and May 25 came from Collingswood High School, where incidents ranged from cellphone and bicycle thefts to marijuana possession, according to police incident reports obtained by the Inquirer on Tuesday.
NEWS
July 11, 2016
Todd A. Cox is the director of criminal justice policy at the Center for American Progress ( www.americanprogress.org ) Danyelle Solomon is the director of Progress 2050 at the center Multiple shots fired point-blank into a man outside a convenience store, pinned down on the ground by two officers. Multiple shots fired into a car pulled over for a broken taillight, while a 4-year-old child sits in the backseat. One day later, the country woke up to yet another devastating act of gun violence: the deplorable assassination of law enforcement officers in Dallas as Black Lives Matter protesters peacefully marched the streets against police violence.
NEWS
July 7, 2016 | By Chris Brennan, Staff Writer
With a U.S. Senate vote looming Wednesday to strip Philadelphia and other municipalities of millions in federal grant funding, Democrat Katie McGinty has called on Mayor Kenney to alter his "sanctuary city" policy. Philadelphia, which is receiving nearly $39 million in Community Development Block Grants this year, could see that funding put at risk due to legislation being pushed by Sen. Pat Toomey to punish sanctuary cities. Toomey, a Lehigh County Republican, has made the controversial immigration issue a centerpiece of his bid for a second term against McGinty, the Democratic nominee.
NEWS
July 6, 2016
By Ed Feulner It's been only 15 years since the 9/11 attacks. But when you look at how the terrorist threat has evolved since then, it seems as if a century or more has gone by. Things have been changing - fast. And if our response doesn't change, and just as quickly, we're practically begging for trouble. Not another 9/11, necessarily, but another Orlando. Another Fort Hood. Another San Bernardino. Indeed, the sheer magnitude of 9/11 can almost blind us to the metastasizing danger out there.
NEWS
May 27, 2016 | By Barbara Boyer, Staff Writer
Two high-ranking officials in the Somerset County (N.J.) Prosecutor's Office are retiring in the wake of allegations that authorities failed to properly collect and store evidence, and destroyed other evidence, in the 2014 investigation of the deaths of Cooper Health System CEO John P. Sheridan Jr. and his wife. The office's deputy chief of detectives, Steven Ughetta, and chief of detectives, Timothy M. Fitzgerald, will retire Tuesday, acting Prosecutor Michael Robertson confirmed Wednesday.
NEWS
May 26, 2016
ISSUE | RACIAL BIAS Killings are not all the same Philadelphia Police Sgt. Robert Wilson III was killed doing what he was trained to do and what he took as his personal responsibility - to protect others. We are saddened by his death and proud of his recognition. Trayvon Martin was an unarmed teenager who was shot by a person who had been instructed by law enforcement to stay in his vehicle. The writer of the letter "Mixed signals in killings of blacks" (Friday) needs to examine the facts before alleging and assuming prejudice in the reaction of a non-monolithic community.
NEWS
May 24, 2016
By Adam Bates Our cellular phones, the U.S. Supreme Court recently opined, contain "a digital record of nearly every aspect of [our] lives - from the mundane to the intimate. " Indeed, many of us use our cellphones to privately convey our love, our insecurities, our fears, our locations, and our most sensitive relationships. Yet right now, across the United States, law enforcement agents have secret, unfettered access to all of it, and the government is trying to keep it that way. It was recently revealed that the FBI has been colluding with the Oklahoma City Police Department to conceal the use of equipment capable of powerful, surreptitious, and constitutionally dubious cellphone surveillance.
NEWS
May 12, 2016
By Milad Emam For the past six years, Elizabeth Young has been living an American nightmare. Philadelphia police officers showed up at her house and tried to seize her home and car because her son sold $90 worth of marijuana outside her home. Young was never charged with a crime, yet she was soon caught up in Philadelphia's civil-forfeiture machine. With the deck stacked against her, Young went to Philadelphia's criminal justice center and fought to get her property back, arguing that she was an innocent owner because she did not know her son was dealing drugs, having been hospitalized during that time.
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