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NEWS
September 26, 2015 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
TRENTON - The New Jersey Supreme Court on Thursday relaxed the standard by which police may search an automobile without obtaining a warrant, ruling that the current test "does not provide greater liberty or security" to the state's residents "and has placed on law enforcement unrealistic and impracticable burdens. " With the 5-2 decision, the high court reversed precedent, finding that its previous standard had resulted in unintended consequences such as a surge in consent searches and prolonged roadside stops.
NEWS
September 24, 2015 | By Angela Couloumbis, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - There will be more porn - and lots of it. As beleaguered Pennsylvania Attorney General Kathleen G. Kane waits for her law license suspension to take effect, her spokesman said Tuesday the office was preparing to release hundreds of sexually explicit emails shared by state officials and employees on government time and computers. Kane first signaled her intention to do so Monday, hours after the state Supreme Court voted to suspend her license while she faces criminal charges.
NEWS
September 23, 2015 | By Angela Couloumbis and Craig R. McCoy, Inquirer Staff Writers
HARRISBURG - In an unprecedented move, the Pennsylvania Supreme Court on Monday suspended the law license of Attorney General Kathleen G. Kane, a step that could increase the chances that the legislature will try to remove her from office. The high court's decision was unanimous, endorsed by the court's three Republicans and two Democrats. Lawyers for the state disciplinary board that oversees lawyers sought the suspension after Kane was charged last month with perjury, obstruction, and other offenses stemming from allegations that she illegally leaked grand jury material and then lied about it under oath.
NEWS
September 16, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Services are set for Tuesday, Sept. 15, for Karl von Lipsey Sr., 89, formerly of Philadelphia, a law enforcement investigator whose specialty was white-collar and financial crime. Mr. von Lipsey died Wednesday, Aug. 5, of complications from a stroke at the Foulkeways in Gwynedd, where he had lived since 2004 after the death of his wife, Mary-Elizabeth von Lipsey. The two were married for 54 years. In 1950, Mr. von Lipsey began a distinguished career in law enforcement as an officer with the Philadelphia Police Department.
NEWS
September 4, 2015 | By Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
Gov. Christie provided more detail Wednesday on his recent call for use of FedEx-style technology to cut down on the number of people who overstay visas, suggesting people could be tracked by their thumbprints. "I'm not saying, 'Put bar codes on people.' That's ridiculous," Christie said on Fox News' Outnumbered , in one of three media appearances he made Wednesday. "But, you know, we need to use technology to secure our border. " Christie drew attacks from Democrats and immigrant groups after suggesting in New Hampshire on Saturday that FedEx's package-tracking system could be a model for tracking people who overstay visas, an analogy he repeated in an interview on Fox News Sunday . Asked on the Fox program Wednesday how his approach would work - "Are people supposed to swipe their thumbprint every time they use an ATM?"
NEWS
September 2, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
The execution-style slaying of a Texas sheriff's deputy has critics of the Black Lives Matter movement committing the same offense they accuse its proponents of: using a broad brush to indiscriminately accuse both the guilty and the innocent. The Harris County, Texas, deputy, Darren Goforth, 47, was shot repeatedly in the back without any apparent provocation or motive Friday night, just as he finished refueling his police cruiser at a gas station. Surveillance video captured a suspect fleeing in a red pickup truck that police traced to Shannon Jaruay Miles, 30, who was later arrested on capital murder charges.
NEWS
August 29, 2015 | By Angelo Fichera, Inquirer Staff Writer
A New Jersey Superior Court judge has rebuffed The Inquirer's attempts to obtain a slew of records pertaining to the six-month investigation into the deaths of Cooper Health System CEO John P. Sheridan Jr. and his wife, Joyce. Judge Yolanda Ciccone in Somerville dismissed the newspaper's lawsuit pursuing the documents - including law enforcement recordings and transcripts, witness interviews, crime scene reports, DNA tests, and warrants - which were previously denied by government agencies under the state's Open Public Records Act and the common-law right of access.
NEWS
August 11, 2015 | By Michael Boren, Inquirer Staff Writer
The 700-pound robot took a beating as the man with a sledgehammer hacked off its arm and then, in a surprising show of strength, shoved its mangled body off the front porch of the Lindenwold home. The Camden County Sheriff's Office had sent the robot - which has a microphone through which a deputy can speak - to negotiate with the man after he fired gunshots in the neighborhood and barricaded himself. Now, with the robot having drawn the man out of the home after about an hour, authorities realized that he no longer had a gun. The SWAT officers approached and, as the man tried to charge at them, Capt.
NEWS
August 11, 2015 | By Michaelle Bond, Inquirer Staff Writer
As the camera attached to its underbelly snapped pictures, the drone glided a few hundred feet above the quiet, tree-lined suburban streets of North Coventry Township. It was tracing the path of a killer, investigators say. Chester County prosecutors are hoping the images captured by the unmanned device, driven by four propellers and weighing less than a half-gallon of milk, will help prove that a man arrested last month carefully planned his fatal attack on a rival who was involved with his ex-girlfriend.
NEWS
August 8, 2015 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
Police will face a massive task in screening the 100,000 pedestrians a day expected to cross the Ben Franklin Bridge from New Jersey to see the pope in Philadelphia next month. If 100,000 people are screened, that would be four times as many people as are screened at Philadelphia International Airport on an average day. Law enforcement officials briefed on bridge security plans said all papal visitors would be individually screened before they crossed the bridge. They spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to talk about the plans.
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