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NEWS
August 11, 2015 | By Michael Boren, Inquirer Staff Writer
The 700-pound robot took a beating as the man with a sledgehammer hacked off its arm and then, in a surprising show of strength, shoved its mangled body off the front porch of the Lindenwold home. The Camden County Sheriff's Office had sent the robot - which has a microphone through which a deputy can speak - to negotiate with the man after he fired gunshots in the neighborhood and barricaded himself. Now, with the robot having drawn the man out of the home after about an hour, authorities realized that he no longer had a gun. The SWAT officers approached and, as the man tried to charge at them, Capt.
NEWS
August 11, 2015 | By Michaelle Bond, Inquirer Staff Writer
As the camera attached to its underbelly snapped pictures, the drone glided a few hundred feet above the quiet, tree-lined suburban streets of North Coventry Township. It was tracing the path of a killer, investigators say. Chester County prosecutors are hoping the images captured by the unmanned device, driven by four propellers and weighing less than a half-gallon of milk, will help prove that a man arrested last month carefully planned his fatal attack on a rival who was involved with his ex-girlfriend.
NEWS
August 8, 2015 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
Police will face a massive task in screening the 100,000 pedestrians a day expected to cross the Ben Franklin Bridge from New Jersey to see the pope in Philadelphia next month. If 100,000 people are screened, that would be four times as many people as are screened at Philadelphia International Airport on an average day. Law enforcement officials briefed on bridge security plans said all papal visitors would be individually screened before they crossed the bridge. They spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to talk about the plans.
NEWS
June 17, 2015 | By Angela Couloumbis, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - Following months of controversy, Gov. Wolf's embattled choice to lead the Pennsylvania State Police on Monday withdrew his name from consideration. Acting State Police Commissioner Marcus Brown's decision was announced in a statement from the governor's office. In it, Brown did not state a reason for the decision. But Wolf cited politics. "Marcus Brown is the type of leader that Pennsylvania would be lucky to have," the governor said in the statement. "Despite Marcus' vast and unquestioned qualifications, the Senate wrongfully rejected his nomination in a move that put politics above the best interests of the people of Pennsylvania, and it is now appropriate to select a new nominee to lead the Pennsylvania State Police.
NEWS
June 8, 2015 | By Andrew Seidman and Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
Gov. Christie hasn't negotiated with other countries or shaped foreign policy. But he does claim one resumé detail to distinguish himself on national security ahead of a likely 2016 presidential run: the Patriot Act. Even as Congress scales back the law, Christie has been arguing forcefully for the tools given to law enforcement and intelligence agencies after 9/11 as crucial to prosecuting terrorists. Yet the importance of the Patriot Act in Christie's tenure as a prosecutor is less clear than he asserts.
NEWS
June 5, 2015 | By Angela Couloumbis and Ben Finley, Inquirer Staff Writers
HARRISBURG - Gov. Wolf's embattled nominee to head the Pennsylvania State Police on Wednesday cleared a key hurdle on the path to confirmation, but his future remains in question. Skeptical Republican legislators on the Senate Law and Justice Committee grilled acting Commissioner Marcus Brown about everything from the death penalty and tax breaks to why he chose not to wear a police uniform to the hearing. When it ended, the committee chose not to endorse Brown but forwarded his nomination to the full Senate for a vote next week.
NEWS
June 4, 2015
ISSUE | EARLY LEARNING Investments pay off sooner, and later I was happy to see Gov. Wolf and law enforcement officials make the anticrime case for quality, early-childhood education ("Wolf: Invest in preschool, not prison," May 27). Members of the business community see another critical benefit: strengthening our economy and workforce. Research highlighted by the national business-leader group ReadyNation shows that investing in these programs yields up to $26,000 in net long-term economic benefits for every child served.
NEWS
May 27, 2015
LYING TO GET sex has been going on since Adam ate the proverbial apple. It will never stop. But wouldn't it be great if there was somewhere that a burned lover could turn to if she discovered that the man who told her he was childless not only had a 10-year-old, but also a pregnant side jawn? Or if the person they're sleeping with showed them photos of a beautiful home he claimed to own but in reality was living in his parents' basement? In other words, wouldn't it be great if a woman duped into having sex could have the jerk arrested?
NEWS
April 27, 2015 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
Camden County Police Chief Scott Thomson boasted of his department's achievements in curtailing crime and repairing its relationship with the community at a Harvard University summit hours after a standout high school football player was gunned down and became Camden's eighth and youngest homicide victim this year. "This is a watershed moment for law enforcement organizations," Thomson told a Cambridge, Mass., audience just after 4:30 p.m. Saturday. He was alluding to the deaths of unarmed black men at the hands of police in Ferguson, Mo.; South Carolina, and elsewhere.
NEWS
April 22, 2015 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
WHEN IT COMES to brainstorming sessions on building stronger bonds between law-enforcement officials and the communities they serve, one vital group seems to be missing: Young people. "Any police official will tell you these discussions are dominated by older folks," Deputy Commissioner Richard Ross said yesterday at the U.S. Attorney's Office in Center City after one such discussion. "Without them, we can't get to the core of the issues at hand, and it's clear why: They have the most contact with police.
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