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NEWS
May 7, 2014 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
So this is what history looks like in real time. For nearly 231 years, lawyers for Rawle & Henderson L.L.P. have been plying courthouses in Philadelphia for clients with urgent legal needs, and that would make it the oldest law firm in the United States. Fittingly, its offices at 13th and Chestnut Streets are redolent of its deep ties to the past. An oil portrait of name partner Joseph Henderson, a onetime president of the American Bar Association, hangs prominently. On display nearby is a letter from Secretary of the Treasury Alexander Hamilton to firm founder William Rawle, delicately inquiring about progress in a case.
BUSINESS
June 2, 1995 | By Julie Stoiber, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Pepper, Hamilton & Scheetz has hired three partners and four associates from a Pittsburgh law firm to launch an office in western Pennsylvania. The Center City firm, Philadelphia's third-largest, opened the Pittsburgh office yesterday. It is Pepper's fourth office in the state - the others are in Philadelphia, Harrisburg and Berwyn - and 12th overall. The new office will be headed by three partners from the Pittsburgh firm of Doepken Keevican Weiss & Medved, including name partner George M. Medved, who concentrates his practice in construction litigation.
NEWS
January 23, 2012 | By Mark Fazlollah and Jennifer Lin, Inquirer Staff Writers
The Philadelphia Housing Authority paid at least $700,000 to a Washington lobbyist, channeling much of the money through the law firm Ballard, Spahr L.L.C., while repeatedly telling federal officials it wasn't engaged in lobbying, records show. The payments - a $10,000-a-month retainer - went to American Continental Group, whose president is David J. Urban, a former chief of staff for then-Sen. Arlen Specter. In an interview, Urban described his job as primarily "telling the story" of PHA and its executive director Carl R. Greene to Congress.
BUSINESS
February 21, 1995 | By Julie Stoiber, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
After growing at a rate of 10 percent a year for 10 years, the Center City law firm of Cozen & O'Connor has cut back. Late last week, it completed a months-long retooling in which it dropped six lawyers, 20 paralegals and more than 20 secretaries and administrative workers at offices around the country, said Stephen A. Cozen, chairman. The cuts were achieved through attrition, resignations and layoffs. The firm grew from 26 lawyers in one office in 1981 to 220 lawyers in eight offices in 1994.
BUSINESS
August 8, 1996 | By Julie Stoiber, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Harold Cramer is leaving his job as chairman and CEO of Graduate Health System when that entity consolidates with Allegheny Health system, but he is not retiring. Cramer said yesterday that he would return to Mesirov Gelman Jaffe Cramer & Jamieson, the Center City law firm he left 20 years ago. "I'm still vigorous, and I'm very interested in health care," said Cramer, 69. "I don't expect to spend my time on the golf course or clipping coupons. " As a lawyer-adviser to health-care clients at the firm, Cramer said he would be in a position to help "in a practical way. I know how the system works.
NEWS
March 16, 1991 | By S. A. Paolantonio, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ronald D. Castille, the Republican Party leadership's choice for mayor, yesterday joined the Center City law firm of Reed, Smith, Shaw & McClay - at a whopping raise over his salary as district attorney. David C. Auten, managing partner of Reed Smith's Philadelphia office, said he "expects Castille to be a significant contributor to the firm's litigation team. " He will make $130,000 a year. While he was district attorney from 1985 until he resigned Tuesday, his salary was $79,000 a year.
NEWS
February 16, 1994 | by Jack McGuire, Daily News Staff Writer Staff writer Yvonne Latty contributed to this report
Two men were arrested yesterday and charged in the brazen slaying Dec. 20 of a receptionist in a busy Center City law firm. Two homicide detectives had been tracking the suspects for two months, a hunt that took them throughout the city and into several southern states, but led ultimately back to Germantown. Acting on a tip, Detectives Tommy Baker and Joe Fischer went to a house on Greene Street near Abbottsford Road shortly before 10 a.m. and flushed the fugitives out of a back bedroom on the third floor.
BUSINESS
January 7, 2016 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
McCarter & English, a major New Jersey law firm with a presence in Philadelphia, is moving its Center City offices from the BNY Mellon Center at 17th and Market to a new location at 1600 Market Street. The firm said the new offices have a "streamlined" architectural style and open floor plan. The firm has 20 lawyers in Philadelphia who focus on a broad range of commercial and transactional matters including health care, insurance, intellectual property and other practice areas. F. Traynor Beck will continue to serve as the office managing partner.
NEWS
November 21, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Guy A. Cellucci, 59, of Malvern, a managing partner and chairman of the law firm White & Williams, died in his sleep Saturday, Nov. 16, at his vacation home in Avalon, N.J. An autopsy was performed Saturday by the Southern Regional Office of the New Jersey medical examiner, and the cause of death was unknown pending the receipt of toxicology test results. Investigator Liz Kemp said it would take more than a month for the results to become available. She said such tests were routine in cases where the cause of death was unclear.
NEWS
January 4, 1994 | By Daniel Rubin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Philip H. Strubing, 86, former chairman of the Philadelphia law firm of Pepper, Hamilton & Scheetz, and president of the United States Golf Association, died Sunday in Memphis, Tenn., after a long illness. Strubing was a long-time resident of Chestnut Hill who quarterbacked the Princeton University football team during the 1928 season. He also served as captain of the varsity baseball team and won a letter in ice hockey. Strubing grew up in Chestnut Hill, attended Chestnut Hill Academy and graduated from the Lawrenceville School, Princeton and the Columbia University School of Law. During World War II he served as a lieutenant in the Navy's legal department in Washington.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 15, 2016 | By Walter F. Naedele, Staff Writer
Since retiring as a Haddonfield lawyer in 2007, William V. Eisenberg was a voluntary counsel for the Camden Center for Law and Social Justice. "In our family-law department, he worked with clients on child support, child custody," said Jeffrey S. DeCristofaro, the attorney who is the firm's executive director. The nonprofit firm deals mostly with immigration and domestic-violence problems. DeCristofaro came to know Mr. Eisenberg as a soccer coach for a Haddonfield recreation league, when the future lawyer was 8 or 9 years old, and then as a teenage file clerk in an Eisenberg law firm.
NEWS
August 12, 2016
A THIN WALL separates warring rowhouse neighbors on a block of North Warnock Street in the Fern Rock section of the city. Two intelligent but belligerent retirees argue about almost everything, from when their war started to what the issues are. What they share? A feeling of dissatisfaction with the service they got from the oft-called 35th Police District, and that each is living in hell. When next-door neighbors are at war, a reset button is often impossible. One of the women, Deborah Young, is so angry about the neighbor - and with the police and the district attorney - that she's put up a large sign on her front lawn to complain.
BUSINESS
August 5, 2016 | By Chris Mondics, Staff Writer
Most law firms would consider it noteworthy if just one of their cases became a front-page story. But for Schnader Harrison Segal & Lewis, the Center City law firm, that has happened three times in recent months. Given the notoriety of the matters - all are criminal cases - they likely will remain in the public eye for some time. Schnader's lawyers have gone to bat for former U.S. Rep. Chaka Fattah, who is expected to appeal his conviction in June on federal corruption charges; former Pennsylvania State University president Graham Spanier, who is fending off criminal charges that he failed to go to the police with evidence that former assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky had sexually assaulted a minor; and comedian Bill Cosby, who is facing sexual-assault charges in Montgomery County.
NEWS
July 26, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
Paul L. Jaffe, 88, of Philadelphia, a corporate and real estate lawyer who served as a Philadelphia Common Pleas Court judge for two years in the 1990s, died July 22 of an infection at home. Judge Jaffe was senior counsel to the Center City law firm Schnader Harrison Segal & Lewis LLP. His specialty was mergers and acquisitions, as well as real estate and corporate law. Much of his work entailed representing the operators of parking lots here, and in New York, New Jersey, and Seattle.
NEWS
July 24, 2016 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
Former city solicitor Ken Trujillo has joined the law firm of Chamberlain Hrdlicka, which represents clients in tax disputes, tax planning and specialty litigation. Trujillo, who also served earlier in his career as an assistant U.S. Attorney, focuses his practice on contract disputes, securities and anti-trust, internal investigations and other matters. At Chamberlain Hrdlicka, Trujillo will be responsible for helping to expand the firm's Philadelphia area office, which is located in Conshohocken.
BUSINESS
July 19, 2016 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Staff Writer
We investors are suffering a bizarre new phenomenon - where banks and governments are "paying" negative interest rates. Negative rates imply that customers actually pay for keeping money in the bank or in sovereign bonds, rather than receiving interest. Negative interest rates in countries such as Germany and Japan are an experiment to stimulate consumer spending. Just last week, Germany sold 10-year bonds yielding negative rates - investors pay the sovereign to hold these fixed-income securities!
NEWS
July 15, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, STAFF WRITER
Albert Momjian, 82, of Huntingdon Valley, a nationally known expert on family law, a dedicated civic volunteer, and a leader of the Armenian community in America, died Monday, July 11, of an infection at Einstein Medical Center Montgomery. Mr. Momjian was a partner in the Philadelphia law firm of Schnader Harrison Segal & Lewis, where he worked for 24 years before retiring in 2012. He led the firm's family law department. Over the years, he attracted many high-profile clients, including the actor Will Smith, the TV and radio host Larry King, the late Phillies relief pitcher Tug McGraw, and the late Flyers owner Ed Snider.
NEWS
July 14, 2016
The wholesale failure of SEPTA's new commuter railcars has been inconvenient, unsettling, and, to the extent transit officials cast it as the public's problem rather than theirs, exasperating. But it was not entirely unforeseeable. The tortuous process that led to SEPTA's star-crossed purchase of the 120 Hyundai Rotem cars now sidelined with structural flaws produced more warning signals than an active railroad crossing. To wit: SEPTA preliminarily awarded the quarter-billion-dollar contract to a Hyundai-led consortium in 2004 even though the agency's staff ranked the proposal last of four bids.
BUSINESS
July 2, 2016 | By Chris Mondics, Staff Writer
Cross-border deals, a big source of revenue for law firms in Philadelphia and beyond, likely will take a hit from the British vote to exit the European Union, lawyers who specialize in international transactions say. Mergers-and-acquisitions activity had already been softening by June 23, the day of the Brexit referendum, as high asset valuations had begun to discourage investors. But the British vote to leave the EU created a whole new set of problems. For many American companies, the United Kingdom long has been a launching pad for selling into the European continent.
NEWS
June 26, 2016 | By Chris Mondics, Staff Writer
For now, the status quo will remain. The decision by United Kingdom voters to exit the European Union means the British government must now negotiate the terms of its withdrawal, which could take up to two years. The stakes are enormous for Europe and much of the world. London could lose its primacy as an investment center. Yet the effect on the U.S. economy will likely be small. Certainly, the news rattled the stock market, which saw a 610-point drop in the Dow Jones industrial average Friday.
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