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NEWS
May 7, 2014 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
So this is what history looks like in real time. For nearly 231 years, lawyers for Rawle & Henderson L.L.P. have been plying courthouses in Philadelphia for clients with urgent legal needs, and that would make it the oldest law firm in the United States. Fittingly, its offices at 13th and Chestnut Streets are redolent of its deep ties to the past. An oil portrait of name partner Joseph Henderson, a onetime president of the American Bar Association, hangs prominently. On display nearby is a letter from Secretary of the Treasury Alexander Hamilton to firm founder William Rawle, delicately inquiring about progress in a case.
NEWS
January 23, 2012 | By Mark Fazlollah and Jennifer Lin, Inquirer Staff Writers
The Philadelphia Housing Authority paid at least $700,000 to a Washington lobbyist, channeling much of the money through the law firm Ballard, Spahr L.L.C., while repeatedly telling federal officials it wasn't engaged in lobbying, records show. The payments - a $10,000-a-month retainer - went to American Continental Group, whose president is David J. Urban, a former chief of staff for then-Sen. Arlen Specter. In an interview, Urban described his job as primarily "telling the story" of PHA and its executive director Carl R. Greene to Congress.
BUSINESS
June 2, 1995 | By Julie Stoiber, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Pepper, Hamilton & Scheetz has hired three partners and four associates from a Pittsburgh law firm to launch an office in western Pennsylvania. The Center City firm, Philadelphia's third-largest, opened the Pittsburgh office yesterday. It is Pepper's fourth office in the state - the others are in Philadelphia, Harrisburg and Berwyn - and 12th overall. The new office will be headed by three partners from the Pittsburgh firm of Doepken Keevican Weiss & Medved, including name partner George M. Medved, who concentrates his practice in construction litigation.
BUSINESS
February 21, 1995 | By Julie Stoiber, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
After growing at a rate of 10 percent a year for 10 years, the Center City law firm of Cozen & O'Connor has cut back. Late last week, it completed a months-long retooling in which it dropped six lawyers, 20 paralegals and more than 20 secretaries and administrative workers at offices around the country, said Stephen A. Cozen, chairman. The cuts were achieved through attrition, resignations and layoffs. The firm grew from 26 lawyers in one office in 1981 to 220 lawyers in eight offices in 1994.
BUSINESS
August 8, 1996 | By Julie Stoiber, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Harold Cramer is leaving his job as chairman and CEO of Graduate Health System when that entity consolidates with Allegheny Health system, but he is not retiring. Cramer said yesterday that he would return to Mesirov Gelman Jaffe Cramer & Jamieson, the Center City law firm he left 20 years ago. "I'm still vigorous, and I'm very interested in health care," said Cramer, 69. "I don't expect to spend my time on the golf course or clipping coupons. " As a lawyer-adviser to health-care clients at the firm, Cramer said he would be in a position to help "in a practical way. I know how the system works.
NEWS
March 16, 1991 | By S. A. Paolantonio, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ronald D. Castille, the Republican Party leadership's choice for mayor, yesterday joined the Center City law firm of Reed, Smith, Shaw & McClay - at a whopping raise over his salary as district attorney. David C. Auten, managing partner of Reed Smith's Philadelphia office, said he "expects Castille to be a significant contributor to the firm's litigation team. " He will make $130,000 a year. While he was district attorney from 1985 until he resigned Tuesday, his salary was $79,000 a year.
NEWS
June 1, 2015 | By Craig R. McCoy and Angela Couloumbis, Inquirer Staff Writers
Last year, the Pennsylvania Attorney General's Office dropped subpoenas on dozens of nursing homes statewide, demanding facts about their staffing - an opening salvo in a probe that could force the homes to pay big fines. The office says the process will improve conditions and pay off for the state's elderly. Someone else could benefit, too - the Cohen, Milstein, Sellers & Toll law firm. The Washington firm stands to pocket up to $21 million of the first $100 million of any fines extracted by state prosecutors.
NEWS
February 16, 1994 | by Jack McGuire, Daily News Staff Writer Staff writer Yvonne Latty contributed to this report
Two men were arrested yesterday and charged in the brazen slaying Dec. 20 of a receptionist in a busy Center City law firm. Two homicide detectives had been tracking the suspects for two months, a hunt that took them throughout the city and into several southern states, but led ultimately back to Germantown. Acting on a tip, Detectives Tommy Baker and Joe Fischer went to a house on Greene Street near Abbottsford Road shortly before 10 a.m. and flushed the fugitives out of a back bedroom on the third floor.
NEWS
January 4, 1994 | By Daniel Rubin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Philip H. Strubing, 86, former chairman of the Philadelphia law firm of Pepper, Hamilton & Scheetz, and president of the United States Golf Association, died Sunday in Memphis, Tenn., after a long illness. Strubing was a long-time resident of Chestnut Hill who quarterbacked the Princeton University football team during the 1928 season. He also served as captain of the varsity baseball team and won a letter in ice hockey. Strubing grew up in Chestnut Hill, attended Chestnut Hill Academy and graduated from the Lawrenceville School, Princeton and the Columbia University School of Law. During World War II he served as a lieutenant in the Navy's legal department in Washington.
NEWS
March 13, 1994 | By Wendy Beech, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Frederick P. Greiner, 87, a founding member of the law firm of Archer & Greiner and a longtime legal advocate for various South Jersey nonprofit organizations, died Wednesday at his home in Medford. Born in Philadelphia, Mr. Greiner held a childhood dream of becoming a civil engineer because he thought the position called for driving locomotives. After realizing the actual tasks, he briefly considered entering the ministry before deciding on a law career. After graduating from Germantown High School in 1924, he attended Pennsylvania State University.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 4, 2015 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
With many lawsuits expected and a limited amount of money available to compensate victims, sorting through competing personal-injury claims likely will be one of the most delicate legal issues to emerge from the May 12 Amtrak train derailment in Philadelphia. Lawyers who have been involved in litigation over past accidents causing multiple casualties say the biggest hurdle often is finding a fair and transparent way to distribute funds. This is especially so for cases in which payouts are capped as a result of insurance coverage limits, or, in the case of the Amtrak crash, by an act of Congress limiting total payments to $200 million.
NEWS
June 4, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
Ensuring that Pennsylvania nursing homes provide high-quality care is a worthy pursuit. But Attorney General Kathleen Kane's efforts to do so are tainted by a secretive no-bid contract benefiting a campaign contributor. The Washington law firm Cohen, Milstein, Sellers & Toll offered to act as a sort of bounty hunter for the Attorney General's Office, investigating government-financed nursing homes to determine if they employ enough staff to adequately care for patients. The state could seek fines from those that don't meet requirements.
NEWS
June 1, 2015 | By Craig R. McCoy and Angela Couloumbis, Inquirer Staff Writers
Last year, the Pennsylvania Attorney General's Office dropped subpoenas on dozens of nursing homes statewide, demanding facts about their staffing - an opening salvo in a probe that could force the homes to pay big fines. The office says the process will improve conditions and pay off for the state's elderly. Someone else could benefit, too - the Cohen, Milstein, Sellers & Toll law firm. The Washington firm stands to pocket up to $21 million of the first $100 million of any fines extracted by state prosecutors.
BUSINESS
May 20, 2015 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
Is the billable hour, long a staple of the legal industry, going the way of the passenger pigeon, the woolly mammoth and the Pyrenean ibex, extinct species all? Under intense client pressure to justify charges following the stock market crash of 2008, law firms took the first steps during the recession toward moving away from hourly charges by offering clients flat fees or by billing based on case outcomes. Now, the flat-fee movement is gaining momentum, with many big firms employing staffs of MBAs, actuaries and other finance experts to price legal engagements and then to make sure lawyers assigned to these matters stay on budget.
BUSINESS
May 19, 2015 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Lawyers for Gov. Wolf , who campaigned for competitive bidding and lower fees in state legal contracts, told one of the state's biggest employers to hire three Philadelphia law firms - not just the one it wanted - as a condition for routine state and federal tax breaks last month. Back in March, the University of Pennsylvania Health System wanted to borrow up to $400 million for building projects in Philadelphia, Chester County Hospital , and Radnor outpatient offices.
NEWS
May 17, 2015 | By Jessica Parks, Inquirer Staff Writer
Robert J. Kerns, the former Montgomery County GOP chairman who resigned in 2013 amid rape allegations, agreed Friday to be classified as a sexually violent predator. Kerns, 67, of North Wales, pleaded no contest in November to indecent assault on a former employee of his law firm. In an expedited sentencing, he received two years' probation and had to register as a sex offender for 15 years. Friday's ruling elevates his offender status. As a sexually violent predator, he will have to remain registered and receive monthly counseling for the rest of his life.
NEWS
May 10, 2015 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
The law firm representing Gov. Christie's office in the George Washington Bridge lane-closure investigation has billed the state more than $300,000 since December, according to invoices released Friday by the Attorney General's Office. Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher L.L.P. billed the governor's office at a rate of $350 an hour for a total of $311,425 from December through Sunday, the invoices show. Last year, the firm billed the state $7.5 million. Christie's office paid an additional $1.25 million to other law firms last year in connection with the bridge probe.
NEWS
May 3, 2015 | By Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
Federal prosecutors have closed an investigation into claims that officials in Gov. Christie's administration threatened to withhold Hurricane Sandy relief money from Hoboken if the mayor did not approve a private redevelopment deal. In a letter dated Friday, U.S. Attorney Paul J. Fishman and Assistant U.S. Attorney Paul A. Murphy said prosecutors and the FBI had investigated the allegations. "Based on the evidence developed during the investigation and our review of the applicable law, we have concluded that no further action is warranted in this matter," they wrote.
NEWS
April 30, 2015 | By Ben Finley, Inquirer Staff Writer
Writing that Pennsylvania's General Assembly "fell woefully short of the mark," a federal judge on Tuesday struck down a state law that allowed violent-crime victims to sue offenders over speech that causes "mental anguish. " The six-month-old "Revictimization Relief Act" was aimed at quieting the celebrity of convicted cop-killer Mumia Abu-Jamal. But the law violated offenders' First Amendment rights and was so broadly worded that it could limit the speech of people professing their innocence, wrote Chief Judge Christopher C. Conner of Pennsylvania's Middle District.
NEWS
April 9, 2015 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
David Samson, who chaired the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey when the agency became embroiled in the George Washington Bridge lane-closure scandal, is retiring from the law firm he founded. Samson resigned from the Port Authority board in March 2014 as Gov. Christie, a possible Republican presidential contender, sought to move past the controversy. But Samson remained a presence at Wolff & Samson, the West Orange, N.J., firm he cofounded in 1972. The firm announced Tuesday that it was undergoing a leadership transition and would take the name Chiesa Shahinian & Giantomasi P.C. Samson, 75, will retire this month, the firm said.
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