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NEWS
May 7, 2014 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
So this is what history looks like in real time. For nearly 231 years, lawyers for Rawle & Henderson L.L.P. have been plying courthouses in Philadelphia for clients with urgent legal needs, and that would make it the oldest law firm in the United States. Fittingly, its offices at 13th and Chestnut Streets are redolent of its deep ties to the past. An oil portrait of name partner Joseph Henderson, a onetime president of the American Bar Association, hangs prominently. On display nearby is a letter from Secretary of the Treasury Alexander Hamilton to firm founder William Rawle, delicately inquiring about progress in a case.
NEWS
January 23, 2012 | By Mark Fazlollah and Jennifer Lin, Inquirer Staff Writers
The Philadelphia Housing Authority paid at least $700,000 to a Washington lobbyist, channeling much of the money through the law firm Ballard, Spahr L.L.C., while repeatedly telling federal officials it wasn't engaged in lobbying, records show. The payments - a $10,000-a-month retainer - went to American Continental Group, whose president is David J. Urban, a former chief of staff for then-Sen. Arlen Specter. In an interview, Urban described his job as primarily "telling the story" of PHA and its executive director Carl R. Greene to Congress.
BUSINESS
June 2, 1995 | By Julie Stoiber, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Pepper, Hamilton & Scheetz has hired three partners and four associates from a Pittsburgh law firm to launch an office in western Pennsylvania. The Center City firm, Philadelphia's third-largest, opened the Pittsburgh office yesterday. It is Pepper's fourth office in the state - the others are in Philadelphia, Harrisburg and Berwyn - and 12th overall. The new office will be headed by three partners from the Pittsburgh firm of Doepken Keevican Weiss & Medved, including name partner George M. Medved, who concentrates his practice in construction litigation.
BUSINESS
February 21, 1995 | By Julie Stoiber, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
After growing at a rate of 10 percent a year for 10 years, the Center City law firm of Cozen & O'Connor has cut back. Late last week, it completed a months-long retooling in which it dropped six lawyers, 20 paralegals and more than 20 secretaries and administrative workers at offices around the country, said Stephen A. Cozen, chairman. The cuts were achieved through attrition, resignations and layoffs. The firm grew from 26 lawyers in one office in 1981 to 220 lawyers in eight offices in 1994.
BUSINESS
August 8, 1996 | By Julie Stoiber, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Harold Cramer is leaving his job as chairman and CEO of Graduate Health System when that entity consolidates with Allegheny Health system, but he is not retiring. Cramer said yesterday that he would return to Mesirov Gelman Jaffe Cramer & Jamieson, the Center City law firm he left 20 years ago. "I'm still vigorous, and I'm very interested in health care," said Cramer, 69. "I don't expect to spend my time on the golf course or clipping coupons. " As a lawyer-adviser to health-care clients at the firm, Cramer said he would be in a position to help "in a practical way. I know how the system works.
NEWS
March 16, 1991 | By S. A. Paolantonio, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ronald D. Castille, the Republican Party leadership's choice for mayor, yesterday joined the Center City law firm of Reed, Smith, Shaw & McClay - at a whopping raise over his salary as district attorney. David C. Auten, managing partner of Reed Smith's Philadelphia office, said he "expects Castille to be a significant contributor to the firm's litigation team. " He will make $130,000 a year. While he was district attorney from 1985 until he resigned Tuesday, his salary was $79,000 a year.
NEWS
February 16, 1994 | by Jack McGuire, Daily News Staff Writer Staff writer Yvonne Latty contributed to this report
Two men were arrested yesterday and charged in the brazen slaying Dec. 20 of a receptionist in a busy Center City law firm. Two homicide detectives had been tracking the suspects for two months, a hunt that took them throughout the city and into several southern states, but led ultimately back to Germantown. Acting on a tip, Detectives Tommy Baker and Joe Fischer went to a house on Greene Street near Abbottsford Road shortly before 10 a.m. and flushed the fugitives out of a back bedroom on the third floor.
NEWS
June 1, 2015 | By Craig R. McCoy and Angela Couloumbis, Inquirer Staff Writers
Last year, the Pennsylvania Attorney General's Office dropped subpoenas on dozens of nursing homes statewide, demanding facts about their staffing - an opening salvo in a probe that could force the homes to pay big fines. The office says the process will improve conditions and pay off for the state's elderly. Someone else could benefit, too - the Cohen, Milstein, Sellers & Toll law firm. The Washington firm stands to pocket up to $21 million of the first $100 million of any fines extracted by state prosecutors.
NEWS
January 4, 1994 | By Daniel Rubin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Philip H. Strubing, 86, former chairman of the Philadelphia law firm of Pepper, Hamilton & Scheetz, and president of the United States Golf Association, died Sunday in Memphis, Tenn., after a long illness. Strubing was a long-time resident of Chestnut Hill who quarterbacked the Princeton University football team during the 1928 season. He also served as captain of the varsity baseball team and won a letter in ice hockey. Strubing grew up in Chestnut Hill, attended Chestnut Hill Academy and graduated from the Lawrenceville School, Princeton and the Columbia University School of Law. During World War II he served as a lieutenant in the Navy's legal department in Washington.
BUSINESS
October 10, 2013 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Center City law firm Hangley Aronchick Segal Pudlin & Schiller P.C. announced Tuesday what it described as the first significant leadership change in its 19-year history. A co-founder of the firm and chair since its inception, William T. Hangley, will step down as chair, but will continue his trial practice and serve on the board of directors. Mark Aronchick, also a co-founder of the firm and a former city solicitor, will take over as chair, and Ronald Schiller will assume the role of vice chair.
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BUSINESS
August 18, 2015 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
By day, Kermit Roosevelt toils as a constitutional law professor at the University of Pennsylvania, where he is known as an expert on law governing the U.S. military prison in Guantanamo, the Voting Rights Act, and the legal debate over President Obama's health-care plan. But after hours, he has an entirely different line of work. Roosevelt, the great-great-grandson of President Theodore Roosevelt, is carving out a parallel career as a novelist. His first novel, In the Shadow of the Law , a tale of intrigue centered on young Washington lawyers, was published in 2005 by Farrar, Straus & Giroux.
BUSINESS
August 12, 2015 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
The feverish pace of corporate deal making is bolstering law firms that help close complex transactions. Big firms in Philadelphia say buying and selling of companies, along with the forming of strategic partnerships, are proceeding at a pace not seen since 2007, just before the onset of the Great Recession. Part of the reason is that there is pent-up demand. Fewer deals were closed just after the market collapse in 2008 and 2009, but now there are buyers and sellers in greater numbers.
BUSINESS
August 4, 2015
Margaret McGoldrick has been appointed president of Abington-Jefferson Health , where she has served as chief operating officer since 1999. McGoldrick has responsibility for Abington Hospital-Jefferson Health and Abington-Lansdale Hospital, as well as five outpatient centers and two urgent-care centers. Pottstown Memorial Medical Center has hired Rich Newell as chief executive officer. He joins the hospital from Carlisle Medical Center. where he has served as CEO. Christopher G. Mavros has been hired as an associate in the casualty and professional liability defense practice group at the Philadelphia law firm Zarwin Baum DeVito Kaplan Schaer Toddy P.C. He had been national and regional trial counsel for Ford Motor Co. and American Honda Motor Co. Inc. Mann Center for the Performing Arts , Philadelphia, has hired Toby Blumenthal as vice president for artistic planning and chief innovation officer.
NEWS
August 4, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
John Paul Knox, 87, formerly of Oreland, a lawyer in Montgomery County for many years, died Tuesday, July 21, of cancer at Westminster Canterbury of the Blue Ridge, a retirement community in Charlottesville, Va. Mr. Knox and his wife, Eleanor, had moved to Westminster Canterbury in 2006. The son of Paul Waddell Knox and Florence Welch Knox, Mr. Knox grew up in Chestnut Hill and graduated in January 1946 from Central High School. He began early studies at Yale University in the fall of 1945.
BUSINESS
August 1, 2015 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
After a lengthy drought, real estate lawyers are a hot commodity again. The biggest firms in Philadelphia and other cities with booming real estate markets say finding lawyers skilled in handling the zoning, tax, and transactional pieces of complex projects has become a near impossibility. There simply aren't enough lawyers to go around, and that has stretched existing practice groups and forced firms to move lawyers internally from other specialties. " Voracious is the word that I would use to describe what is going on," said Bart Mellits, chair of Ballard Spahr's real estate department, which has more than 100 lawyers.
NEWS
July 31, 2015 | By Erin Edinger-Turoff, Inquirer Staff Writer
Renato Thomas Di Stefano Jr., 86, of Berwyn, an electronics engineer, died Tuesday, July 28, at Foulk Manor South, an assisted-living facility in Wilmington. He had battled Alzheimer's disease for several years. The son of an Italian immigrant father and first-generation American mother, Mr. Di Stefano was born in Yonkers, N.Y. He was a graduate of Fordham Preparatory School in the Bronx and Columbia University, where he was part of the school's first Naval ROTC class. He later returned to Columbia to complete a master's degree in electronics in 1957.
NEWS
July 27, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
A life celebration is scheduled for Wednesday, Oct. 7, for John Sherman Estey, 89, former chairman of the Philadelphia law firm Montgomery, McCracken, Walker & Rhoads, who died of heart failure Tuesday, July 7, at his summer home in Eagles Mere, Pa. The memorial will be from 5:30 to 7 p.m. at the Racquet Club of Philadelphia, 215 S. 16th St. Burial was private. Mr. Estey had a distinguished career practicing corporate and bankruptcy law for more than three decades at Montgomery McCracken starting in the 1960s.
NEWS
July 24, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
ROSEMARY McMunigal was a Delaware County lawyer who, while dedicated to her profession, indulged a passion for helping the less fortunate. "Blessed with a great head and a great heart, Rosemary used her intelligence, strength and compassion to help others," her family said. "Her faith led her to believe in the goodness of people and hope for a better world. " Rosemary Casey McMunigal, a partner in a Media law firm, an active volunteer with a nursing service in Chester, and devoted family matriarch, died July 16. She was 93 and lived in Media's Riddle Village.
BUSINESS
July 21, 2015
Melinda K. Holman , chairman of Holman Automotive, has been named chair of the regional board of the United Way of Greater Philadelphia and Southern New Jersey . Holman will lead the regional board for a two-year term. She succeeds Lon Greenberg , chairman of the board of UGI Corp., who served as chair from 2013-2015.     William R. Sasso has been appointed a member of the board. He is chairman of Philadelphia law firm Stradley Ronon. Raymond Skinner has been elected to the board of the Reinvestment Fund , a nonprofit rebuilding distressed towns and cities through the use of capital and information.
NEWS
June 4, 2015 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
With many lawsuits expected and a limited amount of money available to compensate victims, sorting through competing personal-injury claims likely will be one of the most delicate legal issues to emerge from the May 12 Amtrak train derailment in Philadelphia. Lawyers who have been involved in litigation over past accidents causing multiple casualties say the biggest hurdle often is finding a fair and transparent way to distribute funds. This is especially so for cases in which payouts are capped as a result of insurance coverage limits, or, in the case of the Amtrak crash, by an act of Congress limiting total payments to $200 million.
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