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NEWS
May 7, 2014 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
So this is what history looks like in real time. For nearly 231 years, lawyers for Rawle & Henderson L.L.P. have been plying courthouses in Philadelphia for clients with urgent legal needs, and that would make it the oldest law firm in the United States. Fittingly, its offices at 13th and Chestnut Streets are redolent of its deep ties to the past. An oil portrait of name partner Joseph Henderson, a onetime president of the American Bar Association, hangs prominently. On display nearby is a letter from Secretary of the Treasury Alexander Hamilton to firm founder William Rawle, delicately inquiring about progress in a case.
BUSINESS
June 2, 1995 | By Julie Stoiber, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Pepper, Hamilton & Scheetz has hired three partners and four associates from a Pittsburgh law firm to launch an office in western Pennsylvania. The Center City firm, Philadelphia's third-largest, opened the Pittsburgh office yesterday. It is Pepper's fourth office in the state - the others are in Philadelphia, Harrisburg and Berwyn - and 12th overall. The new office will be headed by three partners from the Pittsburgh firm of Doepken Keevican Weiss & Medved, including name partner George M. Medved, who concentrates his practice in construction litigation.
NEWS
January 23, 2012 | By Mark Fazlollah and Jennifer Lin, Inquirer Staff Writers
The Philadelphia Housing Authority paid at least $700,000 to a Washington lobbyist, channeling much of the money through the law firm Ballard, Spahr L.L.C., while repeatedly telling federal officials it wasn't engaged in lobbying, records show. The payments - a $10,000-a-month retainer - went to American Continental Group, whose president is David J. Urban, a former chief of staff for then-Sen. Arlen Specter. In an interview, Urban described his job as primarily "telling the story" of PHA and its executive director Carl R. Greene to Congress.
BUSINESS
February 21, 1995 | By Julie Stoiber, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
After growing at a rate of 10 percent a year for 10 years, the Center City law firm of Cozen & O'Connor has cut back. Late last week, it completed a months-long retooling in which it dropped six lawyers, 20 paralegals and more than 20 secretaries and administrative workers at offices around the country, said Stephen A. Cozen, chairman. The cuts were achieved through attrition, resignations and layoffs. The firm grew from 26 lawyers in one office in 1981 to 220 lawyers in eight offices in 1994.
BUSINESS
August 8, 1996 | By Julie Stoiber, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Harold Cramer is leaving his job as chairman and CEO of Graduate Health System when that entity consolidates with Allegheny Health system, but he is not retiring. Cramer said yesterday that he would return to Mesirov Gelman Jaffe Cramer & Jamieson, the Center City law firm he left 20 years ago. "I'm still vigorous, and I'm very interested in health care," said Cramer, 69. "I don't expect to spend my time on the golf course or clipping coupons. " As a lawyer-adviser to health-care clients at the firm, Cramer said he would be in a position to help "in a practical way. I know how the system works.
NEWS
March 16, 1991 | By S. A. Paolantonio, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ronald D. Castille, the Republican Party leadership's choice for mayor, yesterday joined the Center City law firm of Reed, Smith, Shaw & McClay - at a whopping raise over his salary as district attorney. David C. Auten, managing partner of Reed Smith's Philadelphia office, said he "expects Castille to be a significant contributor to the firm's litigation team. " He will make $130,000 a year. While he was district attorney from 1985 until he resigned Tuesday, his salary was $79,000 a year.
NEWS
February 16, 1994 | by Jack McGuire, Daily News Staff Writer Staff writer Yvonne Latty contributed to this report
Two men were arrested yesterday and charged in the brazen slaying Dec. 20 of a receptionist in a busy Center City law firm. Two homicide detectives had been tracking the suspects for two months, a hunt that took them throughout the city and into several southern states, but led ultimately back to Germantown. Acting on a tip, Detectives Tommy Baker and Joe Fischer went to a house on Greene Street near Abbottsford Road shortly before 10 a.m. and flushed the fugitives out of a back bedroom on the third floor.
NEWS
November 21, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Guy A. Cellucci, 59, of Malvern, a managing partner and chairman of the law firm White & Williams, died in his sleep Saturday, Nov. 16, at his vacation home in Avalon, N.J. An autopsy was performed Saturday by the Southern Regional Office of the New Jersey medical examiner, and the cause of death was unknown pending the receipt of toxicology test results. Investigator Liz Kemp said it would take more than a month for the results to become available. She said such tests were routine in cases where the cause of death was unclear.
BUSINESS
October 3, 2015 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
DLA Piper, the world's second-largest law firm by number of lawyers, has set its sights on growing in Philadelphia. Philadelphia managing partner Carl Buchholz said DLA plans to double its lawyers here to around 100 within a few years, building on its litigation and intellectual-property practices. Although revenue from corporate clients industry-wide has seen only tepid growth in recent years, DLA leaders say they are confident that the firm's national and global platforms will draw the lawyers they want to recruit and new clients.
BUSINESS
January 7, 2016 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
McCarter & English, a major New Jersey law firm with a presence in Philadelphia, is moving its Center City offices from the BNY Mellon Center at 17th and Market to a new location at 1600 Market Street. The firm said the new offices have a "streamlined" architectural style and open floor plan. The firm has 20 lawyers in Philadelphia who focus on a broad range of commercial and transactional matters including health care, insurance, intellectual property and other practice areas. F. Traynor Beck will continue to serve as the office managing partner.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 21, 2016 | By Jeff Gammage and Martha Woodall, STAFF WRITERS
Bill Green believes he knows a way to help the beleaguered Philadelphia schools: restore him to his job as chairman of the School Reform Commission. On Tuesday, he formally announced the filing of a lawsuit that aims to lift him from the ranks of commission membership and place him back at its head. State legislators "might have more confidence in sending the district money" if he were in charge, he said after a news conference at School District offices. His main purpose in suing to overturn his ouster by Gov. Wolf, Green said, is to prove a point of law, and protect the independence of the SRC and the office of chairman.
BUSINESS
April 17, 2016 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pepper Hamilton said Friday it severed ties with a consulting firm founded by its former chairman, Louis Freeh. Freeh, the former FBI director, left Pepper Hamilton in February to rejoin his old firm, Freeh, Sporkin & Sullivan. But the consulting firm, Freeh Group International Solutions, which focused on assisting clients with internal investigations, compliance and other matters, had remained as a unit of Pepper Hamilton. The law firm, which is in merger talks with the Reed Smith law firm, said it had transferred ownership of the Freeh Group International back to Freeh in March.
NEWS
April 16, 2016
It was good to see Gov. Christie finally end his six-year attempt to make the New Jersey Supreme Court a partisan minion, but his latest nominee to the court raises questions that deserve thorough scrutiny by the state Senate before he is confirmed. Walter F. Timpone, a prosecutor in the U.S. Attorney's Office from 1984 to 1994, raised controversy in 2001 when federal agents investigating U.S. Sen. Robert Torricelli feared he had tipped off Torricelli that one of Timpone's legal clients had been asked to wear a hidden microphone in a meeting with the senator.
BUSINESS
April 15, 2016 | By Harold Brubaker, STAFF WRITER
Lawyers for the defunct Foxwoods casino project in South Philadelphia lost their bid in bankruptcy court to recoup the $50 million license fee Foxwoods paid in 2007. In a 64-page ruling Friday, U.S. Bankruptcy Judge Magdeline D. Coleman rejected the Foxwoods group's arguments under bankruptcy code and said she did not have jurisdiction over certain other counts, which belong in state court. A lawyer for the Foxwoods group - formally known as Philadelphia Entertainment & Development Partners L.P. - said he would recommend that his client appeal the bankruptcy issues to U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania.
BUSINESS
April 14, 2016 | By Chris Mondics, Staff Writer
Reed Smith, a global law firm founded in Pittsburgh that has a large presence in Philadelphia, has confirmed that it is in merger talks with Pepper Hamilton. The firm said that the talks were in the preliminary stage but that there appeared to be many advantages to a combination. "Reed Smith has been clear about its interest in strengthening its industry focus and adding to strategic practice areas," the law firm said. "In executing this strategy we speak regularly with law firms around the world regarding our respective objectives.
NEWS
April 2, 2016 | By Jacob Adelman, STAFF WRITER
Royer Cooper Cohen Braunfeld has moved its Center City operations from 1700 Market Street to larger offices at Two Logan Square to accommodate increasing demand, the Conshohocken-based law firm said Thursday. The firm relocated at the beginning of March to a 7,800-square-foot space at the new location, for which it has a lease of roughly six years, executive partner Neil Cooper said. Its previous Center City operations occupied 3,700 square feet. The firm opened its satellite at 1700 Market on a temporary basis in 2014 to "test the waters" in Center City, but quickly outgrew the space, Cooper said.
NEWS
April 2, 2016 | By Kathy Boccella and Chris Mondics, STAFF WRITERS
Peter Mills Mattoon, 84, of Lafayette Hill, a longtime leader of the Philadelphia law firm Ballard Spahr, died Tuesday, March 29, at Jefferson University Hospital of injuries sustained in a fall. Mr. Mattoon started in Ballard Spahr's relatively staid estates practice, but it wasn't long before he began to work in the more glamorous precincts of major-league sports, where he represented the 76ers and their owner at the time, philanthropist Eugene Dixon Jr. His lawyering was so skillful that his colleagues at Ballard eventually elevated him to the role of firm chairman and he stayed in that leadership position for more than 16 years, until he stepped down in 1997.
BUSINESS
March 29, 2016 | Mike Zebe Staff
The Philadelphia intellectual-property firm Panitch Schwarze Belisario & Nadel L.L.P. has hired Jifang Tao as a scientific adviser to support the firm's patent work on behalf of clients in biotechnology, pharmaceutical, and chemical industries. Tao was a postdoctoral fellow at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and a graduate student and research assistant at University of California, Los Angeles. Tao earned her bachelor of science degree in biological sciences with a minor in English from Tsinghua University, Beijing, with honors, and her Ph.D.
NEWS
March 5, 2016 | By Andrew Maykuth, Staff Writer
SCRANTON - Erik Roos waited more than six years to tell a jury his story about shale-gas drilling and water contamination in rural Dimock Township. When he finally got a chance to testify this week, he was done in about a half-hour. Roos was one of 44 Dimock residents who sued Cabot Oil & Gas Co. in federal court in 2009, alleging that the company's Marcellus Shale drilling had polluted their water wells. Roos and most of the plaintiffs settled in 2012, to his enduring dissatisfaction.
NEWS
March 2, 2016 | By Craig R. McCoy, Staff Writer
The special prosecutor hired by Pennsylvania Attorney General Kathleen G. Kane to examine the evidence in the pornographic email scandal says it is unlikely he will bring criminal charges against anyone involved. Douglas F. Gansler, in an interview Monday, said bringing charges under obscenity statutes would be far-fetched. Such prosecutions have become fairly rare nationwide, he said. As for the former or current officials who swapped pornographic or otherwise offensive emails on government computers, Gansler said their conduct might violate workplace rules, but was hardly criminal.
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