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NEWS
October 16, 1990 | By Kathy Brennan, Daily News Staff Writer
Want to know the difference between right and wrong? Steal the answer. Someone in town, obviously among the irony-impaired, did just that, slicing out dozens of pages of ethics laws from books in the city's law library with a razor blade, said its director, Regina Smith. And just to be safe, the thief also cut out the disciplinary procedures for ethics violations, she said. About 35 books at the Theodore F. Jenkins Memorial Law Library on Chestnut Street near 9th have been found vandalized over the past few months, she said.
SPORTS
November 17, 1999 | By Joe Logan, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The first hole, a tricky little dogleg around the law library stacks, was no piece of cake. Neither was the minimalist third hole - a long, straightaway hole that demanded deadly accuracy off the tee for any hope at par. But yesterday, on the 38th floor of the white-shoe Center City law firm of Saul, Ewing, Remick & Saul, it was the treacherous and cruel double-dogleg sixth hole - up the corridor, around the stacks, then back the other way with...
NEWS
June 24, 1993 | By Robert Moran, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The Honorable Francis J. Catania Law Library is in sad shape. Less than three years ago, the county hired a Bucks County contractor to repair the leaky roof of the courthouse library. Things didn't turn out the way officials had hoped, so the county sued the contractor, ACC Roofing Inc. of Bensalem, in former Judge Catania's old haunt, Delaware County Court. Last October, the County Council awarded a $327,491 contract to Marland Roofing & Siding Co. of Glen Mills to redo the repairs on the law library, the Fronefield Building in Media and the Juvenile Detention Center in Lima.
NEWS
May 11, 2004
ON MAY 12, 1986, an article appeared in the Daily News written by Dave Racher about a jailhouse lawyer by the name Robert "Bobby Irish" Cullen. Cullen was 59 at the time, serving 30 to 60 years for six robberies committed in 1973 and 1974. Dave Racher went on to say "his legal talents have helped hundreds of inmates win their freedom, some on technicalities. " He further stated that Cullen, while serving time in New Jersey, helped former boxer Rubin "Hurricane" Carter win a new trial in a triple-murder case.
NEWS
May 18, 2001 | By Mary Anne Janco INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
While in the prison's law library, Robert Rivera, accused of kidnapping and murdering his 20-month-old daughter, flinched, then blurted out, "I lost it. I did it. I killed Katelyn," a jailhouse informant testified yesterday. Rivera, 34, of Upper Chichester, is accused of snatching Katelyn Rivera-Helton from her baby-sitter's home after assaulting the baby's mother, Jennifer Helton, on Aug. 10, 1999. Katelyn was last seen with Rivera at a Chadds Ford gas station that night.
NEWS
October 25, 1988 | By Edgar Williams, Inquirer Staff Writer
To a person in the habit of contemplating the science of jurisprudence, nothing is more interesting than to trace the original sources of its formation. - William Rawle, Philadelphia lawyer, 1802 It was March 1802. Thomas Jefferson was in the White House. There were 16 states in the union. And, in Philadelphia, William Rawle and 71 other lawyers made a big move. They pooled their scarce law books and other legal materials and founded a library. The Law Library Company of the City of Philadelphia.
NEWS
February 26, 1997 | By S. Joseph Hagenmayer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Calvin Wood Corman, 76, professor emeritus at Rutgers Law School and an authority on commercial and contract law, died yesterday at Kennedy Memorial Hospitals-University Medical Center/Cherry Hill Division. A Cherry Hill resident since 1962, he was born in Waco, Texas. A widely recognized expert on commercial and contract law, Mr. Corman helped develop international trade legislation that eventually took the form of the international contracts law adopted by Congress in the late 1980s.
NEWS
June 14, 1996 | By Andy Wallace, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Vincent Ziccardi, 63, of South Philadelphia, one of the city's busiest and best-known criminal defense lawyers, died Tuesday of kidney failure and cancer at the Skilled Nursing Center of the Pennsylvania Hospital. Mr. Ziccardi learned all about criminal defense during the 11 years he spent with the Philadelphia Defender Association, most it as head of the agency, which in those days (1963 to 1974) defended 85 percent of criminal cases in the city. "He was funny, witty, a generous man who understood what was best for the people that defenders represented," said Bob Scandone, who worked for him in the defender association.
NEWS
August 31, 1993 | By Robert Moran, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The Delaware County Council will hire an expert to review the work of the original engineer and contractor involved in roofing repairs on three county buildings - repairs that are now the focus of a lawsuit. An agreement with Ewing Cole Cherry Brott, a well-known Philadelphia architectural and engineering firm, is expected to be approved by the council at its weekly meeting today. The firm will review design plans and work done on the Juvenile Detention Center in Lima, the Fronefield Building and the courthouse law library in Media.
NEWS
October 12, 2000 | By Mary Anne Janco, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Delaware County Councilwoman Kathrynann W. Durham of Concord has been nominated to fill a vacancy on Delaware County Court. The opening was created when R. Barclay Surrick accepted a federal judgeship this summer. Gov. Ridge nominated Durham, 49, a former state representative, on Tuesday. If the nomination is confirmed by a two-thirds vote of the state Senate, Durham, a Republican, would serve until Jan. 1, 2002. Durham was a state representative from the 160th District from 1979 to 1996, when she joined the county council.
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NEWS
June 22, 2013 | By Carolyn Davis, Inquirer Staff Writer
A former bookkeeper at Montgomery County's Law Library who allegedly used public money for personal expenses waived her preliminary hearing Friday. Judge Margaret Hunsicker transferred the case of Barbara Melnyk, 55, to Common Pleas Court, where the Norristown resident will be formally arraigned July 31. Melnyk was arrested at the courthouse June 14. Charges include theft, receiving stolen property, and conspiracy. She is free on $10,000 bail. The charges came after an audit from County Controller Stewart J. Greenleaf Jr. uncovered problems in Law Library accounts.
NEWS
September 22, 2011 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
James C.N. Paul, 85, a Philadelphia native and former dean of Rutgers Law School in Newark, N.J., who helped found the first law school in Ethiopia, died of prostate cancer Tuesday, Sept. 13, at home in Trappe, Md. While teaching at the University of Pennsylvania Law School in the early 1960s, Mr. Paul made several trips as an Eisenhower Fellow and on behalf of the Peace Corps to universities in Ethiopia and other African nations. In 1963, he accepted an invitation from Haile Selassie University, now Addis Ababa University, to oversee the creation of a law school.
NEWS
October 14, 2010
Several months ago, Ira Einhorn initiated correspondence with Daily News columnist Ronnie Polaneczky. This is an edited version of his recent take on the judicial system. SINCE MY ABRUPT return to the Pennsylvania Prison System in 2001, I have had numerous conversations with shocked former citizens who have repeated the same words to me, in different form, again and again: "I never dreamed that people caught up in the judicial system could be treated so unfairly, with such lack of concern for their rights.
NEWS
January 9, 2010 | By Mari A. Schaefer INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The owner of a cat euthanized by the Delaware County SPCA won a small victory - and very small monetary judgment - yesterday when an arbitration panel found negligence and awarded $1. In April 2006, 8-year-old Keecha was euthanized at the shelter after a 24-hour stay. Less than two hours later, her owner, Margaret Reynard of Upper Darby, walked through the door to see if she could find her pet. "I am very happy we won," Reynard said yesterday. Reynard sued the shelter for negligence, saying the SPCA did not follow its own procedures for euthanizing cats, including holding them for 72 hours, and asked for an award not to exceed $50,000.
BUSINESS
May 24, 2009 | By Chris Mondics INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A brash experiment in legal education aimed at providing more on-the-job training for young lawyers and less academic theory will cross a critical threshold Wednesday. That is when the Drexel University School of Law will graduate its first class, about 160 strong (the school doesn't yet have an exact count because it is still checking grades, pro bono hours, and other requirements), in a ceremony at the Kimmel Center. The question that hovered over the program from the very start - whether there is a need for yet another law school - has, if anything, become more pointed.
NEWS
June 20, 2006
YOUR JUNE 16 editorial ("Clearing the Air") on the smoking ban quotes the CEO of the Chamber of Commerce as saying that the "facts" show that a smoking ban "will not adversely affect business. " If Mayor Street believes that and wants to sign the smoking ban, then how about showing a little good faith and guaranteeing that claim? If he and other supporters of the ban truly believe that bars will not suffer losses, then why not back that up with something more solid than mere words?
NEWS
January 21, 2005 | By Kathleen Brady Shea INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
You can't blame David Dewees Richardson for thinking outside the box - after all, he is a veteran inmate. But Richardson, 46, whose criminal history spans more than two decades on charges ranging from disorderly conduct to robbery and homicide, has dreams that go far beyond those of the average incarcerated litigant. Richardson is attempting to sue the District Attorney's Office, arguing that too much time elapsed between his arrest in a West Chester bank robbery and his preliminary hearing, violating his rights.
NEWS
May 19, 2004 | By Kevin Dale FOR THE INQUIRER
On a perfect spring day, as people lunch in front of the Delaware County Courthouse and take smoke breaks between its classic columns, it is hard to imagine a time when the building did not exist. In Delaware County, the business of the courthouse seems as routine and timeless as the changing of the seasons. Although county departments are now split between the courthouse and the adjoining modern Government Center, the courthouse is the white-marble heart of Media and the county.
NEWS
May 11, 2004
ON MAY 12, 1986, an article appeared in the Daily News written by Dave Racher about a jailhouse lawyer by the name Robert "Bobby Irish" Cullen. Cullen was 59 at the time, serving 30 to 60 years for six robberies committed in 1973 and 1974. Dave Racher went on to say "his legal talents have helped hundreds of inmates win their freedom, some on technicalities. " He further stated that Cullen, while serving time in New Jersey, helped former boxer Rubin "Hurricane" Carter win a new trial in a triple-murder case.
NEWS
October 1, 2003 | By Kathleen Brady Shea INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Some might call it overkill for a killer. But authorities could hardly be blamed for taking extra precautions to transport four-time convicted murderer Norman Johnston into the Chester County courthouse yesterday. After all, the last time Johnston visited these parts, in August 1999, he was an escapee from maximum security at Huntingdon State Prison for 18 days. A convoy of seven vehicles and more than a dozen police officers, a handful in camouflage fatigues, shadowed Johnston from the state prison in Camp Hill to West Chester.
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