CollectionsLaw Professor
IN THE NEWS

Law Professor

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
July 12, 2004 | By Tina Moore INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Marcus Schoenfeld, 71, of Bryn Mawr, a law professor, optimist and devoted father, died July 5 at home of cardiac arrest due to complications from diabetes. Mr. Schoenfeld, a native New Yorker, received a degree in economics from Harvard College in 1954 and a law degree from Harvard Law School in 1957. He began his career as a professor of law at Cleveland-Marshall College of Law in Ohio. He joined the faculty of Villanova University School of Law in 1966, where he taught for the next 35 years and met his wife, Lyn Befarah, a law student.
NEWS
July 28, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Warren McElroy Ballard, 102, a professor emeritus at Temple University's School of Law, died Thursday, July 18, of natural causes at his home in Catonsville, Md. A native of St. Louis, Dr. Ballard lived in the same house in Wyndmoor for 51 years before moving in 2002 to a retirement community in Catonsville. As a young man, he was a precocious student. He completed high school in Maplewood, Mo., and earned a bachelor's degree from the University of Virginia in 1932 and a master's degree in 1933, both in political science with honors.
NEWS
March 16, 2014 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
Despite the big titles he held and the grand awards he won, Temple University law professor Edward Ohlbaum was at heart a trial lawyer and teacher, equally comfortable in front of a jury or a classroom. An expert on evidence, an advocate for the American justice system, a defender of children's rights, and the author of three books, Mr. Ohlbaum, 64, died Thursday, March 13, after battling kidney cancer. He kept his medical condition private and continued working until the day before he died.
NEWS
August 4, 1991 | By Judy Baehr and Tia Swanson, Special to The Inquirer
Calvin Corman has received the finest tribute he could ask for. A portrait of the Cherry Hill law professor has been hung in the entrance to the School of Law Library at Rutgers University's Camden campus, honoring Corman's 30-year career. He is the first Camden-Rutgers faculty member who was not a dean to have a portrait made. Corman, 70, retired from his full-time job as a professor July 1. Only one other man, Albert Blaustein, has a longer record of uninterrupted service to the school.
NEWS
February 26, 1997 | By S. Joseph Hagenmayer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Calvin Wood Corman, 76, professor emeritus at Rutgers Law School and an authority on commercial and contract law, died yesterday at Kennedy Memorial Hospitals-University Medical Center/Cherry Hill Division. A Cherry Hill resident since 1962, he was born in Waco, Texas. A widely recognized expert on commercial and contract law, Mr. Corman helped develop international trade legislation that eventually took the form of the international contracts law adopted by Congress in the late 1980s.
NEWS
September 14, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Penelope Pether, 55, of Haverford, a law professor at Villanova University, died Tuesday, Sept. 10, of cancer at Pennsylvania Hospital. Dr. Pether was a widely published legal scholar, specializing in the theory and practice of judging in the federal courts; feminist legal theory; the history of racial discrimination; and rape-law reform. "Penny Pether was a well-respected educator, dedicated mentor, and beloved friend and colleague," said John Gotanda, dean of the Villanova School of Law. "Her passion for teaching was immeasurable, and her death is a tremendous loss for the Villanova Law community.
NEWS
May 15, 1995 | By Catherine Quillman, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
After President Clinton dropped University of Pennsylvania law professor Lani Guinier in 1993 as his nominee to head U.S. civil rights enforcement efforts, she decided that the worst aspect of the whole experience was being "denied the right to speak. " On Friday, as keynote speaker of the 18th Annual Conference on Black History in Pennsylvania, Guinier spoke at length about not only her controversial views on affirmative action, but also about fairness, free expression and the qualities of good leadership.
NEWS
February 21, 1988 | By Jane M. Von Bergen , Inquirer Staff Writer
When Paul H. Robinson, 39, got tapped to go to Washington to help draw up new guidelines for sentencing every person convicted in the federal court system, he saw it as a once-in-a-century opportunity to make a dramatic impact on the nation's criminal-justice system. Instead, he discovered - to his frustration and disillusionment - that the process was fraught with politics. "It was a historic opportunity missed," said the Collingswood father of two. "That was what was so disappointing to me. " On Feb. 1, Robinson submitted his resignation to the U.S. Sentencing Commission.
NEWS
March 5, 1987 | By Susan Warner, Inquirer Staff Writer
A bank vice president who is a Republican and a law professor who is a Democrat have applied to fill the vacancy on the Lower Merion Board of Commissioners created by the resignation of Francis Doyle. Doyle, a Republican who represented Ward 13 in Merion, has been in ill health and resigned Saturday. His term would have ended Dec. 31. The candidates, Republican Fenton J. Fitzpatrick and Democrat David A. Sonenshein, have both said in interviews that they will run for the seat this year if they are not appointed to fill the vacancy.
NEWS
May 18, 1998 | by Marc Meltzer, Daily News Staff Writer
John M. Lindsey, a mentor and inspiration for Temple University Law School students for 34 years, died Thursday of pulmonary fibrosis. He was 66 and lived in Swarthmore. Lindsey was emeritus law professor and former law librarian at Temple Law School. "John Lindsey was a great man," said Peter J. Liacouras, president of Temple University and former dean of the Law School. "His devotion to students and faculty was apparent from his first days as the law librarian. "He transformed the procedures and morale of the law school community to a library-friendly environment - a legacy that will continue for generations.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 4, 2015 | By Ben Finley, Inquirer Staff Writer
It didn't take long for the uproar over religious-freedom laws in Indiana and Arkansas to reverberate in Pennsylvania. Democrats, including Gov. Wolf, grabbed onto the controversy this week to bolster their bid for a state ban on discrimination against members of the LGBT community. The proposal would make it illegal for businesses to fire workers or deny customers because they are gay, lesbian, bisexual, or transgender. It would also offer protections beyond antidiscrimination measures already passed by more than 30 municipalities, including Philadelphia, Haverford, Abington, and New Hope.
BUSINESS
March 21, 2015 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
More than most, Ted Ruger understands legal complexity. And a good thing, too. The former Supreme Court law clerk is set to take over as dean of the University of Pennsylvania law school July 1. Penn, along with a handful of other elite U.S. law schools, brands itself as a training ground for top students who learn to grapple with the most difficult legal problems. That's why so many of the highest-paying law firms want to hire them, even in a job market that still is struggling.
NEWS
March 4, 2015 | BY SOLOMON LEACH & REGINA MEDINA, Daily News Staff Writers leachs@phillynews.com, 215-854-5903
A DAY AFTER a major shake-up on the School Reform Commission, the new chair of the Philadelphia School District's governing body said she does not foresee big changes to her role or the way the district handles contract negotiations with the teachers union. "I can't say that there'll be a change in approach," Marjorie Neff, a career educator, said about bargaining with the Philadelphia Federation of Teachers. "All of the SRC members are committed to making sure we have a contract that is fiscally responsible and giving [Superintendent]
BUSINESS
February 12, 2015 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
Former Blank Rome chairman David F. Girard-diCarlo and his wife, Constance, announced a $5 million gift Tuesday to the Villanova University law school for the establishment of a center on ethics and compliance. The center, launched a few months ago, will offer course work, programs, and conduct research on corporate compliance and ethics, an area of increased focus by business, government regulators, and law enforcement. "Adhering to the highest ethical standards in your profession and encouraging others with whom you interact to do the same can and will create a culture that promotes achievement," said a statement released by Girard-diCarlo and his wife, a lawyer and former Aramark executive.
NEWS
December 8, 2014 | By Brielle Urciuoli, Inquirer Staff Writer
Only two women were wearing caps and gowns at the Rutgers University School of Law in Camden graduation in 1963. Barbara Kulzer of Medford was one, and she went on to make significant contributions in law. Ms. Kulzer died Nov. 28 after a three-month battle with liver problems and pneumonia. She was a professor and then associate dean at the Rutgers Camden Law School for three decades before retiring in 1998. In retirement, Ms. Kulzer, 74, served as counsel to her brother Michael's law firm, Kulzer & DiPadova in Haddonfield.
NEWS
December 5, 2014 | BY REGINA MEDINA, Daily News Staff Writer medinar@phillynews.com, 215-854-5985
A DATA-DRIVEN opinion piece written by a Temple University law professor led a prominent charter-school leader to fight back on Twitter yesterday, claiming the professor shoots at unarmed boys. Twitterverse was not pleased. "What does Temple law professor Susan DeJarnatt and Ferguson police officer Darren Wilson have in common? They both shoot at unarmed boys," David P. Hardy wrote in a tweet sent out at 5:07 a.m. yesterday. Hardy is the chief executive officer of Boys' Latin of Philadelphia Charter School and a spokesman for PhillySchoolChoice.com, a new group that advocates for charter and parochial schools.
NEWS
September 8, 2014 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jeffrey Rosen, author, constitutional law professor, and president and chief executive officer of the National Constitution Center, may have hit upon a novel idea. At a time when public debate over the central constitutional and political issues of the day has devolved into a dispiriting swamp of   ad hominem attacks, misleading ad campaigns, and television shouting matches, Rosen says there is a public hunger for civilized, respectful conversation. Since taking over at the center last year, he has organized a series of public forums featuring prominent guests from the political right and left to unravel weighty and emotional issues, from gun control to the use of drone strikes, within the context of constitutional law. Give Rosen half a chance and he waxes rhapsodic about the nation's founding documents.
NEWS
August 12, 2014 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
The piece hung over the sofa in Arlen Specter's Capitol office: Framed replicas of the failed U.S. Senate resolution to impeach Bill Clinton, personally signed by all 100 senator/jurors, the House members who prosecuted the case, and members of Clinton's defense team. The meticulous U.S. senator was proud that he had created such a historically significant document, but something nagged at him: "There's one signature we don't have," he told his chief of staff, David Urban. Bill Clinton's.
NEWS
May 10, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Joseph W. Marshall Jr., 88, of Philadelphia, a professor emeritus at Temple University Law School, died Sunday, May 4, of congestive heart failure at Bryn Mawr Hospital. The law school hailed him on its website as "a legendary tax professor who served the law school from 1960 to his retirement in 1996. " His was a quick rise. He began as a lecturer in 1960, then served as an associate professor for two years before being named a full professor in 1968. In addition to teaching taxation, Mr. Marshall developed the Graduate Tax Program and directed it from 1970 to 1984.
NEWS
April 25, 2014 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
Rutgers University announced a new chancellor Wednesday for its Camden campus: a former professor at Temple University's law school who is now the law school dean at the University of Maryland. Phoebe A. Haddon, 63, will join Rutgers-Camden on July 1, returning to a region where she worked for decades and the state where she grew up. "It seems like a great place for me to come to after five years of being a dean here. It has a real nice-size campus for the kind of work that I'd like to do," Haddon said Wednesday afternoon.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|