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NEWS
July 12, 2004 | By Tina Moore INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Marcus Schoenfeld, 71, of Bryn Mawr, a law professor, optimist and devoted father, died July 5 at home of cardiac arrest due to complications from diabetes. Mr. Schoenfeld, a native New Yorker, received a degree in economics from Harvard College in 1954 and a law degree from Harvard Law School in 1957. He began his career as a professor of law at Cleveland-Marshall College of Law in Ohio. He joined the faculty of Villanova University School of Law in 1966, where he taught for the next 35 years and met his wife, Lyn Befarah, a law student.
NEWS
July 28, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Warren McElroy Ballard, 102, a professor emeritus at Temple University's School of Law, died Thursday, July 18, of natural causes at his home in Catonsville, Md. A native of St. Louis, Dr. Ballard lived in the same house in Wyndmoor for 51 years before moving in 2002 to a retirement community in Catonsville. As a young man, he was a precocious student. He completed high school in Maplewood, Mo., and earned a bachelor's degree from the University of Virginia in 1932 and a master's degree in 1933, both in political science with honors.
NEWS
March 16, 2014 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
Despite the big titles he held and the grand awards he won, Temple University law professor Edward Ohlbaum was at heart a trial lawyer and teacher, equally comfortable in front of a jury or a classroom. An expert on evidence, an advocate for the American justice system, a defender of children's rights, and the author of three books, Mr. Ohlbaum, 64, died Thursday, March 13, after battling kidney cancer. He kept his medical condition private and continued working until the day before he died.
NEWS
August 4, 1991 | By Judy Baehr and Tia Swanson, Special to The Inquirer
Calvin Corman has received the finest tribute he could ask for. A portrait of the Cherry Hill law professor has been hung in the entrance to the School of Law Library at Rutgers University's Camden campus, honoring Corman's 30-year career. He is the first Camden-Rutgers faculty member who was not a dean to have a portrait made. Corman, 70, retired from his full-time job as a professor July 1. Only one other man, Albert Blaustein, has a longer record of uninterrupted service to the school.
NEWS
June 17, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
Lewis Becker, 78, of Villanova, a law professor at Villanova University for more than four decades, died Sunday, June 12, of complications from glioblastoma brain cancer at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. He had been diagnosed in March, his family said. Professor Becker joined what is now Villanova's Charles Widger School of Law in 1972, rose to professor in 1976, and retired in 2011 as an emeritus professor, although he kept teaching for several more years. "Professor Becker left an indelible mark on the Law School community and the generations of students he educated and inspired," the school said in a tribute on its Facebook page.
NEWS
September 14, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Penelope Pether, 55, of Haverford, a law professor at Villanova University, died Tuesday, Sept. 10, of cancer at Pennsylvania Hospital. Dr. Pether was a widely published legal scholar, specializing in the theory and practice of judging in the federal courts; feminist legal theory; the history of racial discrimination; and rape-law reform. "Penny Pether was a well-respected educator, dedicated mentor, and beloved friend and colleague," said John Gotanda, dean of the Villanova School of Law. "Her passion for teaching was immeasurable, and her death is a tremendous loss for the Villanova Law community.
NEWS
February 26, 1997 | By S. Joseph Hagenmayer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Calvin Wood Corman, 76, professor emeritus at Rutgers Law School and an authority on commercial and contract law, died yesterday at Kennedy Memorial Hospitals-University Medical Center/Cherry Hill Division. A Cherry Hill resident since 1962, he was born in Waco, Texas. A widely recognized expert on commercial and contract law, Mr. Corman helped develop international trade legislation that eventually took the form of the international contracts law adopted by Congress in the late 1980s.
NEWS
May 15, 1995 | By Catherine Quillman, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
After President Clinton dropped University of Pennsylvania law professor Lani Guinier in 1993 as his nominee to head U.S. civil rights enforcement efforts, she decided that the worst aspect of the whole experience was being "denied the right to speak. " On Friday, as keynote speaker of the 18th Annual Conference on Black History in Pennsylvania, Guinier spoke at length about not only her controversial views on affirmative action, but also about fairness, free expression and the qualities of good leadership.
NEWS
February 21, 1988 | By Jane M. Von Bergen , Inquirer Staff Writer
When Paul H. Robinson, 39, got tapped to go to Washington to help draw up new guidelines for sentencing every person convicted in the federal court system, he saw it as a once-in-a-century opportunity to make a dramatic impact on the nation's criminal-justice system. Instead, he discovered - to his frustration and disillusionment - that the process was fraught with politics. "It was a historic opportunity missed," said the Collingswood father of two. "That was what was so disappointing to me. " On Feb. 1, Robinson submitted his resignation to the U.S. Sentencing Commission.
NEWS
March 5, 1987 | By Susan Warner, Inquirer Staff Writer
A bank vice president who is a Republican and a law professor who is a Democrat have applied to fill the vacancy on the Lower Merion Board of Commissioners created by the resignation of Francis Doyle. Doyle, a Republican who represented Ward 13 in Merion, has been in ill health and resigned Saturday. His term would have ended Dec. 31. The candidates, Republican Fenton J. Fitzpatrick and Democrat David A. Sonenshein, have both said in interviews that they will run for the seat this year if they are not appointed to fill the vacancy.
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NEWS
September 12, 2016
John Yoo is a law professor at the University of California at Berkeley, a former Justice Department official, and coeditor of "Liberty's Nemesis: The Unchecked Expansion of the State" Children born on Sept. 11, 2001, will turn 15 today. They will not have known the world before three hijacked airliners crashed into the World Trade Center and the Pentagon, killing 3,000, and before brave passengers brought a fourth airliner down in a Pennsylvania field rather than let it crash into the Capitol or White House.
NEWS
July 6, 2016 | By Susan Snyder, Staff Writer
Temple University early Tuesday morning elevated law school dean JoAnne A. Epps to provost, its number-two position, replacing Hai-Lung Dai, who was removed from the post last week. The appointment, subject to approval by the board of trustees, would be permanent - not interim, as universities often do so they can launch a national search. Epps, 65, who has spent 31 years at the law school, the last eight as its dean, was appointed by president Neil D. Theobald. Her title will include senior vice president and chief academic officer also, and she will oversee academics across the university's 17 schools and colleges and 12 administrative offices.
NEWS
June 17, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
Lewis Becker, 78, of Villanova, a law professor at Villanova University for more than four decades, died Sunday, June 12, of complications from glioblastoma brain cancer at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. He had been diagnosed in March, his family said. Professor Becker joined what is now Villanova's Charles Widger School of Law in 1972, rose to professor in 1976, and retired in 2011 as an emeritus professor, although he kept teaching for several more years. "Professor Becker left an indelible mark on the Law School community and the generations of students he educated and inspired," the school said in a tribute on its Facebook page.
NEWS
June 15, 2016 | By Maria Panaritis and Angela Couloumbis, STAFF WRITERS
HARRISBURG - Four lawyers, including the top aide to the Pennsylvania attorney general, told a state Senate panel Monday that a bill to let child sex-abuse victims sue for decades-old attacks would violate the state's constitution and ultimately fail if challenged in the courts. "However righteous the policy goals behind [the bill], the General Assembly in its zeal cannot overrule a state constitutional right," said Bruce L. Castor Jr., the former Montgomery County prosecutor who was appointed solicitor general this year by Attorney General Kathleen G. Kane.
BUSINESS
June 14, 2016 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Staff Writer
We're living in a world of single-digit returns. That was the main takeaway from endowment and foundation investment managers at an institutional investor roundtable Thursday in Boston, where most of the top colleges and universities decried the stock market's current low level of returns. The market has run up so much since the Great Recession, there seems to be little room to run further. "I would be tickled to get 3 percent" real returns annually - meaning after inflation - in the current market environment, said John Alexander, chief investment officer of the Clemson University Foundation, who oversees the school's endowment.
BUSINESS
April 16, 2016 | By Chris Mondics, STAFF WRITER
Roger Dennis, dean of the Thomas R. Kline School of Law of Drexel University, plans to retire in June of 2017, university provost M. Brian Blake announced in a letter to the faculty and staff on Wednesday. Dennis is the founding dean of the law school, which opened its doors in 2007 and he was instrumental in seeing it through the American Bar Association accreditation process, completed in 2011. Blake said Dennis agreed to stay while the university conducts a national search for his replacement.
NEWS
January 18, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
Charles H. Rogovin, 84, of West Conshohocken, a law school professor and longtime law enforcement official at the state and federal level, died Sunday, Jan. 10, of a suspected heart attack at Lankenau Hospital. Mr. Rogovin, a specialist in criminal law, as well as in organized and white-collar crime, joined the Temple University School of Law faculty in 1977. At his retirement in 2009, he was named professor of law emeritus. He held numerous high-profile jobs in public service.
NEWS
August 15, 2015 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
In some circles, Washington law professor Edgar S. Cahn, 80, is a social justice icon and poverty law pioneer whose many accomplishments changed the legal landscape. "The people who know him think he's a saint, but far too few people know him," said Martin Friedman, executive director of EducationWorks. Friedman and his local nonprofit, which runs after-school and social-justice programs in Philadelphia, Chester, and Camden, wants to change that. It hopes to increase Cahn's public profile in the region by awarding him EducationWorks' inaugural Social Justice Award at the National Constitution Center gala on Sept.
NEWS
August 10, 2015 | By Sheena Faherty, Inquirer Staff Writer
The women drifted around the cloth-draped, candlelit tables, cradling glasses of wine and nibbling on cheese cubes. Some, in suits and heels, had arrived directly from work; others, in stylish workout gear, had already been to the gym. Their chatter muffled sounds of the trendy Rittenhouse Square restaurant downstairs. Then the PowerPoint image flashed up. "This is an egg," reproductive endocrinologist Maureen Kelly told the dozen women, now listening intently. The screen showed a human oocyte, the star of this unlikely happy hour on egg freezing for women who want children, but not right now. Sprouting up all over the country, such events have been praised for offering important information and criticized as marketing schemes targeting a vulnerable demographic, women all too aware of their ticking biological clocks.
NEWS
July 7, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
District Attorney Seth Williams has agreed to stop seizing homes and cars from people who aren't even suspected of crimes and haven't been able to contest the seizures in court. It's a belated but welcome retreat from an indefensible practice. Using the state's civil forfeiture law, which is designed to deprive drug dealers of ill-gotten gains, the Philadelphia District Attorney's Office has routinely thrown innocent people out of their homes on the grounds that investigators believed drug crimes took place in them.
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