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NEWS
April 20, 2013 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
C. Clark Hodgson Jr., 73, of Center City, a lawyer who spent more than 40 years in private practice, died Monday, April 15, of cancer at his home. Mr. Hodgson, who specialized in commercial and securities litigation, was former chairman and senior partner at the law firm of Stradley, Ronon, Stevens & Young, where his father, C. Clark Sr., also had been a partner. In 1987, Mr. Hodgson successfully defended Shearson Lehman Bros. Inc., then the nation's third-largest brokerage, in a federal criminal jury trial in Philadelphia against charges of conspiring to launder more than $1.1 million in illegal gambling profits.
BUSINESS
February 27, 2013 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
More than other witnesses, it was the mother-in-law's impassioned testimony that sealed the verdict. There were reams of testimony from experts on the technical causes of the downed utility wire that killed Carrie Goretzka, a young mother of two girls, on June 2, 2009, at her home in Irwin, Pa., 30 miles east of Pittsburgh. But it was the account of JoAnn Goretzka, who spoke of seeing her daughter-in-law engulfed in smoke and flames the day the line came down, that had the most power.
BUSINESS
December 17, 2012 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
If only they knew. Surely a recurring fantasy of many top corporate and transactional lawyers at private firms in Philadelphia is to peer into the minds of their customers: the in-house lawyers who head the legal departments of America's largest companies. These are the in-house counsels who make decisions on their companies' legal "spends," deciding which law firms make it on their lists of outside counsel in the first place, when a company is deciding whether to sue, settle or defend in a legal dispute, and which law firm will take the lead role in a major acquisition.
NEWS
December 12, 2012 | By Kathleen Tinney, Inquirer Staff Writer
Michael J. Izzo Jr., 68, of West Deptford, a senior partner in the Cozen O'Connor law firm whose melodious tenor filled courtrooms and concert halls for four decades, died Sunday, Dec. 9, of complications of leukemia at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital in Philadelphia. When he joined Cozen O'Connor in 1973, he became only the sixth lawyer in the then-small Center City practice. The firm would grow to nearly 600 lawyers in 22 locations, and Mr. Izzo's reputation as a consummate practitioner would burgeon with it. He was known for pulling settlements of tens of millions of dollars from complex litigation, frequently involving product liability and catastrophic property damage.
BUSINESS
October 8, 2012 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
John Thompson spent 14 years on death row in Louisiana's notorious Angola state prison before he was sprung by two Philadelphia lawyers acting on a hunch. Only hours after a Louisiana state judge issued a writ of execution for Thompson, a private investigator sent by his lawyers to search the files of the New Orleans district attorney found blood evidence showing that Thompson was not guilty of one of the charges. The murder conviction was overturned and Thompson won a $14 million jury award in a lawsuit alleging prosecutorial misconduct.
BUSINESS
September 16, 2012 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
Like the rest of this so-called economic recovery, the rebound in the legal market is starting to feel like a grim slog. After signs of a rebound in late 2010 and last year, the reality for many law firms is that the pace of business expansion has slowed, maybe even stopped. Meanwhile, perhaps because of the presidential election, uncertainty has grown. Two new surveys by legal consultants at Wells Fargo Bank and the Hildebrandt Institute show how hard the comeback trail has been on some firms.
BUSINESS
August 27, 2012 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
In a world rife with cynical self-promotion and self-aggrandizement, the Philadelphia Society of St. Vincent de Paul is a Catholic charity whose sole mission is helping others. The society provides financial assistance, food and encouragement to some of the region's poorest residents, putting biblical teaching into practice. In all, about 1,000 Philadelphia-area volunteers make home visits and provide other assistance, all to establish a personal connection with the people they help.
NEWS
August 3, 2012 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
David M. Kozlow, an assistant federal defender in Philadelphia, was not just the frequent lawyer for a career criminal named Wayne Caldwell. Mr. Kozlow was "a very good friend," Caldwell recalled in an interview Tuesday. And that was even though Caldwell, by his own account, faced charges ranging from bank fraud to armed robbery and had been convicted twice since 1982. After being released from prison the last time, in 2005, Caldwell recalled that Mr. Kozlow "was the one who told me that 'the crime life was not the life for you.' " Mr. Kozlow convinced him that "I wasn't a good criminal, because I kept going to jail.
BUSINESS
July 23, 2012 | Chris Mondics
When the legal markets imploded in 2008, and law firms started to ratchet back on hiring first-year associates and filling summer classes, it wasn't at all apparent that law schools, too, would need to tighten their belts. Some law-school administrators bravely claimed that while it was true there were fewer legal jobs, the potential uses of a law degree were so varied that graduates would find a way to land somewhere. There was, at the same time, the hope that the job-market troubles would be temporary, that the economy would revive and things would return to normal.
BUSINESS
July 20, 2012 | Chris Mondics
In his stocking feet, lawyer Paul Clement couldn't be more than 5' 10". But in the world of conservative jurisprudence, he plays the role of a seven foot center. Clement argued the case for 26 state attorneys general and the National Federation of Independent Business in their lawsuit to overturn the Affordable Care Act, a case he arguably lost. One of a handful of top Supreme Court specialists in Washington, he is the go-to lawyer for big companies with major commercial disputes as well as social conservatives seeking to build legal bulwarks around traditional American culture, as they see it. His fluent, on demand rendering of the factual and legal complexities of cases before the Supreme Court was on full display Monday evening at the Union League, the fancy Center City club for Philadelphia's business elite.
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