CollectionsLawn
IN THE NEWS

Lawn

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
May 8, 2016 | By Kevin Brasler, DELAWARE VALLEY CONSUMERS' CHECKBOOK
Sure, you sometimes want it dead: an end to continual mowing, weeding, watering. But the responsible part of you - the part your neighbors appreciate - says you want your lawn lush and green. To get it that way and keep it that way, you can do the work yourself, as most homeowners do, or seek the help of professionals. Even if you hire help, you'll need to prepare to choose the right company and level of service. Nonprofit consumer group Delaware Valley Consumers' Checkbook has surveyed its members and Consumer Reports subscribers.
NEWS
August 21, 1988 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / CHARLES FOX
A RESIDENT of the Philadelphia Protestant Home for the Aged on Tabor Road lets loose with a hose to give the shrubs and flowers a good watering. It was a nice change of pace for the woman, who said she had been hauling the water by hand since Memorial Day because the hose had been out of order.
NEWS
September 8, 2007 | By SOLOMON JONES
"MR. JONES," the detective said pleasantly. "Thanks for coming in voluntarily to tell us what you did. " "Thanks for letting me get it off my chest," I said as his partner stared at me across his battered metal desk. "It's been killing me ever since it happened. " There was an uncomfortable silence. Maybe "killing" wasn't the word I should've used. "So, anyway," the detective said, "I'm going to read you your rights. " "Rights? I thought I was just gonna confess and be on my way. You didn't say anything about reading my rights.
NEWS
July 24, 1988 | By Douglas A. Campbell, Inquirer Staff Writer
In this year of national drought, when you look back on a spring of turf building and lime spreading and look out on a lawn the color of a collie with mange, think of David E. Benner. Benner's lawn in Solebury, Bucks County, is green. But he never set out a lawn sprinkler. He doesn't own a rotary spreader. And he threw away his rusted, unused lawn mower 12 years ago. Benner's lawn is moss. "Everybody's brainwashed into having a grass lawn . . . and it's ridiculous," says Benner, 59, a professor of horticulture at Delaware Valley College in Doylestown.
NEWS
May 27, 1990 | By Stella M. Eisele, Special to The Inquirer
A slow-moving death squad is marching beneath the lush - and the not-so- lush - lawns of many Main Line homes, although it will be late August before the casualty count begins. The invasion began in March, when Japanese beetles in the larval stage came out of hibernation, ravenous after a long winter's nap. Their dietary staples are tender turf roots and the roots of young trees and shrubs. "Don't be fooled by the fact that your lawn looks nice and green now, because we have had a lot of regular rain," said Richie Valentine, retired greenskeeper for the Merion Golf Club.
NEWS
March 23, 1989 | By Michael Klein, Inquirer Staff Writer
Consider the myriad lawn problems of Matthew W. Strader. People expect his lawn to be a vivid green, even when the summer sun has turned every other lawn a dull brown. They expect his lawn to be free of stones, ruts and bald spots - even after they've tromped across it in their spikes, sped over it in their little carts and sliced chunks out of it with their clubs. Strader is the golf-course superintendent at Melrose Country Club, which encompasses 130 acres of rolling, tree-studded turf straddling the Tacony Creek in Melrose Park, Montgomery County.
NEWS
August 18, 1999 | By Bill Jobes
For the first time in a decade and a half, I have the finest looking yard in the neighborhood. At last, my lawn stands out as the best among best. It has no peer. I've seen neighbors furtively cast jealous gazes at my wilting brown expanse and become instantly annoyed that their lawn isn't as dormant. These neighbors are former members of the "Green Club" - the clique which, in a bygone era, lived and died by the lushness of their chemically muscled grass. Nothing was too good, no step too tough, no dollar too frugal not to be spent on manicuring the natural carpet surrounding their home.
NEWS
June 25, 1989 | By Erin Kennedy, Special to The Inquirer
Sheep rustlers are back again. Ornamental lawn sheep rustlers, that is. They hit the area last week, rounding up six in Upper Gwynedd Township and three in Towamencin Township. Those fuzzy creatures with wooden legs planted in manicured turf have cropped up on suburban lawns in the last two years and along with them have come the rustlers, mostly youths playing pranks, police said. "The last time sheep were rustled in the area they turned up in a herd on the Lansdale Borough Hall lawn," said an Upper Gwynedd police dispatcher.
NEWS
June 4, 1989 | By Nancy Caprara, Special to The Inquirer
William Morton is worried about the little stream that runs through his front yard. Most of the farmland surrounding Morton's four-acre homesite on East Copeland Road in East Bradford will be developed soon, adding at least 120 homes to the area. "I just started thinking, they're building beautiful houses, people are going to want beautiful lawns to go with them," said Morton. "Now, what if everybody decides to use something on their grass, pesticides, chemicals. Whatever they use, it's going to end up down here in this stream, and from here it goes right into the Brandywine and people's drinking water.
NEWS
September 8, 1986 | By DAVID HOLAHAN, From the New York Times
It is clear to me now why the Soviet Union clings to its burdensome, ill- gotten empire in Eastern Europe - as well as its latest territory, Afghanistan. What is also coming into sharp focus is the Reagan Administration's preoccupation with "freedom" in Nicaragua, Grenada and farther-flung places, such as Angola. You see, the other day while I was mowing the lawn, which is really an underdeveloped weedy parcel within a four-acre hay field, I noticed that the "civilized" plot was progressively expanding.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
July 11, 2016 | By Jonathan Takiff, Inquirer Technology Writer
While hybrid and fully electric cars have become a harder sell in today's cheap gas environment, there's no denying the enormous appeal of a battery-powered lawn mower. Operation is stupid proof, takes no liquids, and rarely requires servicing. Just charge up the high-capacity, 40-volt lithium ion battery pack for two hours and slide it into the dedicated mower slot (goes in only one way). Simultaneously press and pull the start button and power-up bar. Now you're good to mow a quarter-acre before needing a battery swap-out.
BUSINESS
May 8, 2016 | By Kevin Brasler, DELAWARE VALLEY CONSUMERS' CHECKBOOK
Sure, you sometimes want it dead: an end to continual mowing, weeding, watering. But the responsible part of you - the part your neighbors appreciate - says you want your lawn lush and green. To get it that way and keep it that way, you can do the work yourself, as most homeowners do, or seek the help of professionals. Even if you hire help, you'll need to prepare to choose the right company and level of service. Nonprofit consumer group Delaware Valley Consumers' Checkbook has surveyed its members and Consumer Reports subscribers.
SPORTS
December 10, 2015 | By Mark Macyk, Inquirer Staff Writer
Great Valley's Ashlyn Smith nearly scored as many points in the final 16 seconds Tuesday as her team did in the entire first quarter. Smith grabbed a late steal that led to a go-ahead layup and then converted two free throws as Great Valley rallied for a 44-40 victory over visiting Wilson-West Lawn in a nonleague girls' basketball game. Stephanie Aker added eight points, eight rebounds and six steals for Great Valley, which trailed by 12-7 after one quarter. In other nonleague action: Hannah Fox had 27 points, six rebounds, three steals, and three assists as visiting Penn Charter knocked off Shipley, 58-53.
NEWS
November 20, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
JIM BERRY might have been the best-dressed truck driver in Philly. He drove for a couple of beverage distributors and his uniforms were always clean and pressed, his shoes shined. And his trucks were always immaculate. Stand aside when he went to church. Neat and stylistic were his watchwords. And those Cadillacs of his! They virtually gleamed with polish and perfection. There was only one flaw in Jim Berry's character. He was a Dallas Cowboys fan! Maybe that could be forgiven because even before he moved to Philadelphia from New Jersey, he was a Phillies and 76ers rooter.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 12, 2015 | By Sally McCabe, For The Inquirer
Start cuttings of houseplants. For better or worse, it will soon be time to bring the kids home from Plant Camp (more about the actual process in weeks to come). Now's the time, though, to do triage: Decide which ones will come in, and which ones will only send in representatives. Some houseplants have grown too large over the summer, so take cuttings and put them in smaller pots that will fit on your windowsill. Prime candidate is coleus; take 6-inch cuttings and put them directly into potting soil.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 30, 2015 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
The hard-core classical lover isn't exactly settling when he goes to hear an entire evening of Gershwin. As a melodist, Gershwin is right up there with Schubert. It is especially true that when orchestrated, and orchestrated well, his songs strike a particular vein in the American spirit that is more breathlessly optimistic than Irving Berlin, more urbane than Copland, and yet retains its sincerity to the tender core. The Philadelphia Orchestra and conductor Cristian Macelaru could not have picked a better banner for these ideals than the opener to Friday night's concert at the Mann Center.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 11, 2015 | Eileen Glanton Loftus, For The Inquirer
It used to be that the typical father gleefully awaited the day he could teach his children to mow the lawn. It was a rite of passage - a sign the kids were growing up, and a respite for tired knees. Today, that suburban chore has all but died. Instead, the parents go to work, the kids go to school, and the streets fill up with landscaper trucks. Crews roll mowers out, cut the grass with lightning speed, then head on to the next house, bills paid by mail. It's a situation that invariably raises the question: What's the matter with kids today?
NEWS
November 26, 2014 | By Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writer
A woman was charged with theft after allegedly snatching Christmas decorations and lawn ornaments from two houses in Gloucester Township. Authorities said Monday that Jeanette P. Montanez, 47, of Sewell, Gloucester County, pulled her minivan up to two houses along the 400 block of Dearborne Avenue on Sunday night and took holiday decorations there. A nearby resident saw one of the heists and called 911 with a description of the alleged grinch and a partial license plate. Police traced the information to Montanez's car and went to her address on Salem Avenue in Sewell, where they said they found ornaments and decorations hidden in a wooded area at the end of the street.
NEWS
October 26, 2014 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
What was once City Hall's largely stone and concrete Dilworth Plaza now has a bright swath of green. With a pair of garden shears, city officials snipped a grass ribbon Friday to officially open the Albert M. Greenfield Lawn at the newly renovated Dilworth Park. The green space is named in honor of the former chairman of the city Planning Commission, who was dubbed "Mr. Philadelphia" for his contributions to city planning and revitalization in the 1950s and '60s. The lawn, christened by Temple University gymnasts who back-flipped across it following a trumpet salute, will be open to the public year-round for lounging, recreation, or as an events stage, said Paul Levy, president and chief executive of the Center City District, which completed the project.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|