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Lawn Care

NEWS
February 6, 1992 | By Jennifer Reid Holman, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
Call it the suburban dilemma: How do you maintain that putting-green- perfect lawn without fouling the environment with harmful chemicals? Well, the Moorestown Garden Club, Strawbridge Lake Restoration Association and a group called Save the Environment of Moorestown (STEM) have decided to offer some answers at a series of free workshops this month. At the seminars - the next is Feb. 18 - lawn-care experts share their environmentally sensitive know-how with lawn owners. "Educating people on something like this is crucial," said Renee Boulis, STEM chairwoman.
NEWS
April 22, 2001 | By Angela Valdez INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Grass. Usually, it's the most mundane vegetation. Not in this city. Here, it is at the crux of a debate over the line that separates favoritism from generosity. At issue is whether the city should mow the grass, free of charge, at a private, nonprofit retirement home with ties to the wives of city officials. For at least 20 years, from May to November, municipal workers have made trips twice a month to cut the grass at the Home for Aged Women at 241 York St. Though city officials defend the gratis service, some residents say it's a violation of the public trust.
BUSINESS
March 23, 1989 | By Marian Uhlman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ecogen Inc., a Langhorne start-up biotechnology firm, has completed a major deal to develop alternatives to chemical insecticides for the nation's largest commercial lawn-care company. The agreement, which calls for Ecogen to be the exclusive producer and supplier to ChemLawn Services Corp. of an array of new bioinsecticides to control lawn- and ornamental-plant pests, is to be formally announced today. Under the accord, ChemLawn will pay Ecogen an undisclosed sum to find natural microbes to protect home gardens from insects.
NEWS
July 2, 2003 | By Dean P. Johnson
My wife and I have been negotiating our summer budget, but we are getting nowhere. She claims that I haven't been negotiating seriously. Just because my line items include fundamentals such as CDs, videos, and take-out Chinese, while her focus is on luxuries such as utility bills and groceries, it doesn't mean I am not serious. We were up against the deadline of Tuesday, the start of our fiscal summer. We talked late into the night on Sunday, and all day on Monday. But, try as we did, we just could not reach an agreement.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 13, 1987 | By JIM KNIGHT, Daily News Staff Writer
Adolescence is a time of life in which teen-agers are trying to find themselves. It's also a time in which parents are trying to find the beautiful child that preceded this gawky, know-it-all kid - the one who held so much promise a couple of years back. It is a period when teens mature - and parents age. Appreciating the fact that raising a teen-ager isn't easy, Hahnemann U.'s community health program is starting a course titled "Surviving Adolescence: A Course for Parents," a four-week program on Tuesdays commencing today from 5:15-7:15 p.m. at the hospital, Broad and Vine.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 26, 2015 | By Carolyn Hax
Question: My husband and I are parents of a darling baby girl. Through it all, my husband has done the work of keeping house together, dogs fed, and us fed. All of which I appreciate. But I also feel like there's a certain level of untidiness people would understand given we are new parents; i.e., let the leaves go and spend time with us or with her. We've always had different thresholds for how messy our living space is, but how can we balance the need to share the parenting?
NEWS
March 9, 2012 | By Eva Monheim, Inquirer Columnist
Begin pruning rosebushes. Start by removing dead, damaged, or diseased branches, then look for crisscrossing branches that can rub together and cause long-term damage. If your roses tend to get too big each year, trim them down to 18 to 24 inches, removing the oldest canes and leaving newer ones. If you're a passionate rose grower, think about joining the American Rose Society, which will keep you up to date on rose introductions and care tips. Information at www.ars.org/ Continue pulling invasive plants.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 11, 2015 | Eileen Glanton Loftus, For The Inquirer
It used to be that the typical father gleefully awaited the day he could teach his children to mow the lawn. It was a rite of passage - a sign the kids were growing up, and a respite for tired knees. Today, that suburban chore has all but died. Instead, the parents go to work, the kids go to school, and the streets fill up with landscaper trucks. Crews roll mowers out, cut the grass with lightning speed, then head on to the next house, bills paid by mail. It's a situation that invariably raises the question: What's the matter with kids today?
NEWS
January 21, 2010 | By Virginia A. Smith INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The buzz might never rival a gasoline-powered mower, but there's growing noise out there about reenvisioning a cherished American tradition: the turfgrass lawn. For years, environmentalists have bad-mouthed the water-hogging, wildlife-repelling, gas-guzzling and polluting features of what the Lawn Institute, an industry group, calls "the earth's living skin. " Now, as lawn lovers prepare for spring planting, alternative ideas are gaining traction. One would replace that "living skin" with "freedom lawn," a wild quilt of grass and whatever else grows in. Others suggest having less lawn, or a different kind.
NEWS
October 1, 2002 | By Lisa B. Samalonis
Once upon a time (actually about five years ago), several people told me that buying a house would be cheaper than paying rent. Well, I believed them, and let me tell you they were wrong, wrong, wrong. Maybe in the long-term financial, IRS-taxes kind of way the decision to own a home is a smart one, but from day to day it gets expensive. I traded my escalating rent on a two-bedroom apartment for a house with four bedrooms. My mortgage includes my property taxes and interest.
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