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Lawn Care

NEWS
July 2, 2003 | By Dean P. Johnson
My wife and I have been negotiating our summer budget, but we are getting nowhere. She claims that I haven't been negotiating seriously. Just because my line items include fundamentals such as CDs, videos, and take-out Chinese, while her focus is on luxuries such as utility bills and groceries, it doesn't mean I am not serious. We were up against the deadline of Tuesday, the start of our fiscal summer. We talked late into the night on Sunday, and all day on Monday. But, try as we did, we just could not reach an agreement.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 13, 1987 | By JIM KNIGHT, Daily News Staff Writer
Adolescence is a time of life in which teen-agers are trying to find themselves. It's also a time in which parents are trying to find the beautiful child that preceded this gawky, know-it-all kid - the one who held so much promise a couple of years back. It is a period when teens mature - and parents age. Appreciating the fact that raising a teen-ager isn't easy, Hahnemann U.'s community health program is starting a course titled "Surviving Adolescence: A Course for Parents," a four-week program on Tuesdays commencing today from 5:15-7:15 p.m. at the hospital, Broad and Vine.
NEWS
March 9, 2012 | By Eva Monheim, Inquirer Columnist
Begin pruning rosebushes. Start by removing dead, damaged, or diseased branches, then look for crisscrossing branches that can rub together and cause long-term damage. If your roses tend to get too big each year, trim them down to 18 to 24 inches, removing the oldest canes and leaving newer ones. If you're a passionate rose grower, think about joining the American Rose Society, which will keep you up to date on rose introductions and care tips. Information at www.ars.org/ Continue pulling invasive plants.
NEWS
September 7, 2010 | By Carolyn Hax
Question: I've put my foot down and told my husband our discussion about housework is over and he needs to increase his share of the work, or else. We each estimated the number of hours we put toward housework and kids. I do almost 60 percent of the work. I excluded things on his side that I don't really call work, because I know he enjoys the solitude (lawn care, weeding, finances, cooking, etc.). He doesn't think that's right, but I don't think these tasks compare to vacuuming, doing dishes every night, and cleaning bathrooms.
NEWS
January 21, 2010 | By Virginia A. Smith INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The buzz might never rival a gasoline-powered mower, but there's growing noise out there about reenvisioning a cherished American tradition: the turfgrass lawn. For years, environmentalists have bad-mouthed the water-hogging, wildlife-repelling, gas-guzzling and polluting features of what the Lawn Institute, an industry group, calls "the earth's living skin. " Now, as lawn lovers prepare for spring planting, alternative ideas are gaining traction. One would replace that "living skin" with "freedom lawn," a wild quilt of grass and whatever else grows in. Others suggest having less lawn, or a different kind.
NEWS
October 1, 2002 | By Lisa B. Samalonis
Once upon a time (actually about five years ago), several people told me that buying a house would be cheaper than paying rent. Well, I believed them, and let me tell you they were wrong, wrong, wrong. Maybe in the long-term financial, IRS-taxes kind of way the decision to own a home is a smart one, but from day to day it gets expensive. I traded my escalating rent on a two-bedroom apartment for a house with four bedrooms. My mortgage includes my property taxes and interest.
NEWS
May 31, 2008 | By SOLOMON JONES
I THOUGHT I WAS over my grass addiction. But this week, I learned that what they say is true. Each time you relapse, the habit gets worse. On Wednesday night at 9 o'clock, I found myself watering my grass by moonlight. Being a grass fiend, I didn't want to stop at watering. I wanted more. The thing is, there wasn't much more to do. My grass already looks great. And even if it didn't, I couldn't see well enough to do anything about it, because it was dark out. So why would a man whose lawn is perfect return to a destructive grass addiction?
NEWS
March 23, 1989 | By Michael Klein, Inquirer Staff Writer
Consider the myriad lawn problems of Matthew W. Strader. People expect his lawn to be a vivid green, even when the summer sun has turned every other lawn a dull brown. They expect his lawn to be free of stones, ruts and bald spots - even after they've tromped across it in their spikes, sped over it in their little carts and sliced chunks out of it with their clubs. Strader is the golf-course superintendent at Melrose Country Club, which encompasses 130 acres of rolling, tree-studded turf straddling the Tacony Creek in Melrose Park, Montgomery County.
BUSINESS
May 13, 2014 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Columnist
Herb Hauls grew up far from environmental nirvana, in an asphalt-heavy North Philadelphia neighborhood where buses and cars junked up the air and blades of grass were few. He earned a degree in electrical engineering at Drexel University, working first at Peco Energy Co. and then for the Navy in ship acquisitions, overseeing vessels' electric plants and control systems. He cleared six figures last year, he said. Now, he's mowing lawns for a living. This is not an act of desperation.
NEWS
April 22, 1989 | By Steven Thomma, Inquirer Washington Bureau
Chemicals widely used by lawn-care companies to kill weeds and bugs on millions of lawns across the nation could cause cancer, birth defects, gene mutations or other maladies, according to a new study. "To create the picture-perfect lawn, many lawn-care companies rely heavily on chemical pesticides," said policy analyst Laura Weiss, who wrote the study for Public Citizen, a consumer-rights organization. "But these toxic chemicals may do more than just kill weeds. Many have been found to cause serious adverse health effects as well.
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