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Lawn Mower

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LIVING
April 7, 2006 | By Alan J. Heavens INQUIRER REAL ESTATE WRITER
Blades of grass are pushing their way through; soon they'll be a thicket to be reckoned with. Time to get that lawn mower ready for action. Gas-powered mowers: If the outside of the mower is dirty, heat can build up and wear out the parts too quickly. So you need to get rid of any built-up grass and dirt on the underside of the deck around the blade. To clean the underside, you need to turn the mower over, so you'll have to drain the fuel tank first. Disconnect the rubber hose from the tank to the engine and drain the gasoline into a bucket.
BUSINESS
July 11, 2016 | By Jonathan Takiff, Inquirer Technology Writer
While hybrid and fully electric cars have become a harder sell in today's cheap gas environment, there's no denying the enormous appeal of a battery-powered lawn mower. Operation is stupid proof, takes no liquids, and rarely requires servicing. Just charge up the high-capacity, 40-volt lithium ion battery pack for two hours and slide it into the dedicated mower slot (goes in only one way). Simultaneously press and pull the start button and power-up bar. Now you're good to mow a quarter-acre before needing a battery swap-out.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 24, 1990 | By Irv Slifkin, Special to The Inquirer
When it comes to making movies, John P. Finegan would rather drive than be caddy. This Main Line-based mastermind of low-budget wonders has given the world its first golf horror flick: Blades, an affectionate spoof of Steven Spielberg's Jaws. "This is my tribute to one of the greatest films of all time," Finegan says, while eating a sausage pizza at a Center City restaurant. "In Jaws, when a shark approaches you, you get out of the water. I wondered what you would do with a killer lawn mower in your garage.
NEWS
April 4, 2011 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
I was watching my 12-year-old son play soccer on a beautiful late September morning when my husband called with the kind of news that divides a life into before and after. A neurosurgeon had seen his MRI. He thought Jeff had glioblastoma, a malignant brain tumor. We would need a biopsy to be sure, but there was little doubt. My husband, who was in the hospital on powerful pain pills, didn't fully understand. I did. I knew he would almost certainly die, and soon. I would be a widow.
NEWS
October 16, 1986 | Special to The Inquirer / DAVID JACKSON
PERHAPS PRACTICING for future springtimes, Mathew Kazmierowicz, 2, tests out a miniature version of the lawn mower outside the family's residence in Willingboro. For now, though, father John was doing the lion's share of the yard work.
NEWS
September 2, 1997 | For The Inquirer / PAOLA TAGLIAMONTE
Samantha Madsen, 8, of Newtown Square, trims a curve with some help from Edna Robinson while riding a converted lawn mower. Children ages 7 to 12 competed in the lot of the Kmart in Brookhaven on Saturday. Ryan Delany is behind Samantha.
NEWS
June 6, 1986 | By Howard Means
A while back I wrote about a doctor who suffered a heart attack while trying to start his lawn mower and later successfully sued its manufacturer. The column, which suggested that the plaintiff had a reasonable claim, drew a lot of mail, none favorable and none sympathetic to the doctor or his case. Now along comes a far more compelling plaintiff in a case with infinitely greater pull on our heart-strings and lawyers bearing an argument with far less reason behind it. In the U.S. District Court in Oklahoma City, Betty Ann Marsee is seeking $147 million in damages from the U.S. Tobacco Co., manufacturer of the "smokeless tobacco" that Marsee claims killed her son, Sean.
NEWS
April 22, 2014 | BY DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer geringd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5961
THE PACKER-Combo-Mower - It cuts! It mulches! It edges! It whacks! - was born in the dead of winter, when Bruce Packer, 78, was booted out of the house he'd rented for 18 years across Borbeck Avenue from his Rhawnhurst neighbor, Dennis Gesker, 73, who took him in. Packer had dreamed up a lawn mower on steroids that did everything but kill crabgrass and swat mosquitoes. He told Gesker about it. "I've worked on mowers all my life, finding them in the trash, fixing them up, selling them at flea markets," said Packer, who has been a meat cutter for 60 years.
NEWS
June 18, 2010 | By Elisa Lala, Inquirer Staff Writer
Nadja Milburne walked out of prison in January, looking for a second chance. A new program in Camden is giving her one. Milburne, 25, has been a regular at Opportunity Reconnect-Camden, which houses agencies that help ex-inmates rejoin society. A mother of four, Milburne said she served time for selling drugs and is ready to change her life. "I want to be a mother first and foremost," said Milburne, of Camden. "I want to own a crib. I want a job. I'm not trying to go back to jail.
NEWS
April 18, 1999 | By Mary Anne Janco, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Ever wonder how much pollution that old gas-powered mower is pumping into the ozone layer as it sputters across the front lawn? Or just tired of having a tug-of-war every time you try to start up Old Faithful? Whichever your concern, clean-air advocates say, it is time to make the switch - to electric. And they are offering a deal. Trade in an old gasoline-powered lawn mower - loose handles and rusty parts are a given - and drive away with a $75 rebate coupon toward the purchase of an electric mower.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
July 11, 2016 | By Jonathan Takiff, Inquirer Technology Writer
While hybrid and fully electric cars have become a harder sell in today's cheap gas environment, there's no denying the enormous appeal of a battery-powered lawn mower. Operation is stupid proof, takes no liquids, and rarely requires servicing. Just charge up the high-capacity, 40-volt lithium ion battery pack for two hours and slide it into the dedicated mower slot (goes in only one way). Simultaneously press and pull the start button and power-up bar. Now you're good to mow a quarter-acre before needing a battery swap-out.
NEWS
November 19, 2015 | By Jessica Parks, Inquirer Staff Writer
Over the last 20 years, floods have taken a lot from Deb McGlade: Several cars, a lawn mower, "all the mementos the kids made when they were little. I pretty much have no wedding pictures. " But it wasn't until 2011, when Hurricane Irene and Tropical Storm Lee smashed into the region, that she realized the rushing watery menace pervaded much of Cheltenham Township. "I had no idea that other neighborhoods were flooding as drastically as Brookdale," she said. "That was an eye-opener for me. " That horrific year persuaded McGlade and many others that the township needed to take a comprehensive look at its watershed and find places to ease the pressure.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 2015 | By Sally McCabe, For The Inquirer
Rake the leaves, shred them,  and spread them over any naked soil in the garden. Shredded leaves are fantastic for both composting and mulching, and are much easier to manage than the huge piles of whole leaves that fill our lives and bags this time of year. I even go out and collect all the neighbors' leaf bags, spread them out on my patio or sidewalk, and run them over a few times with the lawn mower. Spread over flower and vegetable beds, and this low-cost mulch blocks light and keeps weed seeds from sprouting, holds moisture in the soil, softens heavy rains, and insulates perennial roots from heaving out of the ground as it freezes and thaws.
NEWS
October 14, 2015 | By Michael Boren, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Burlington County man who was fatally burned Sunday when his lawn mower burst into flames was a retired firefighter who had served in the job for decades, and had tried to share his experience with younger firefighters. Roger Lippincott, 79, taught classes at Burlington County's fire academy, and occasionally stopped by the Springfield Township Fire Company even after he retired, Springfield Township Mayor Denis McDaniel said. "Some guys just disappear when they retire; he didn't," McDaniel said.
NEWS
August 16, 2015 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
STRATHMERE, N.J. - When you're a motel concierge in tiny Strathmere, your options are, shall we say, a bit limited. Then again, you're probably the only concierge in town. That was the lot of Ray Barr, so-called concierge with a cult following at the quirky old-school Strathmere Motel, where the sign on the office door nearly always says "Manager Temporarily Out. " That was certainly true of Barr, 61. He was rarely actually in the office - nobody was - though usually you could find him just around the side, sitting at the patio table sucking on a cigar and drinking a beer or whatever else a guest had put beside him. He was also known as the chief "connoisseur.
NEWS
May 8, 2015
YOU AND I walk through the woods and we see trees and bushes and thorny things. Tess Hooper, a young environmental educator at the Schuylkill Center for Environmental Education, in Upper Roxborough, sees the makings of a fine beer. "This is a staghorn sumac," she said, nodding toward the kind of tree I've seen sprout dozens of times on vacant lots. "It bears these red cones that are like fruit. You could make beer with them. " Hmm . . . I must've missed that merit badge in Boy Scouts.
NEWS
April 22, 2014 | BY DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer geringd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5961
THE PACKER-Combo-Mower - It cuts! It mulches! It edges! It whacks! - was born in the dead of winter, when Bruce Packer, 78, was booted out of the house he'd rented for 18 years across Borbeck Avenue from his Rhawnhurst neighbor, Dennis Gesker, 73, who took him in. Packer had dreamed up a lawn mower on steroids that did everything but kill crabgrass and swat mosquitoes. He told Gesker about it. "I've worked on mowers all my life, finding them in the trash, fixing them up, selling them at flea markets," said Packer, who has been a meat cutter for 60 years.
NEWS
February 21, 2014
HERE in the Upper Midwest, we do battle with Old Man Winter using a two-stage, gas-powered snowblower in every garage. May not need a lawn mower or a leaf blower or air conditioning, but darn sure need a snowblower. It's the first day above 32 degrees here since November, with 8 inches of snow on the ground. We have salt trucks, snowplows, the water company for frozen pipes, so it is not just the power company. Lots of blankets and the fireplace when the power goes out. We ice-fish and play pond hockey, too. We do not listen much to Punxsutawney Phil.
NEWS
May 31, 2013 | By Patricia Schrieber, Inquirer Columnist
Sow more seeds directly into the garden. Once you've finished putting all the transplants into the ground, fill the bare spots by direct seeding. There's still plenty of time to plant more carrots, beans, lettuce, beets, and Swiss chard. Just be sure to give lettuce some shade. By starting zinnia seeds anytime from now until the end of June, you'll reduce the chances of powdery mildew developing, a disease that often disfigures these annual flowers. Adjust your lawn mower. Consider cutting your grass a bit higher than normal.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 2013 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
With the coming of spring, thoughts turn to yard sales - those events in which one set of Americans buys the stuff another set no longer wants for more or less than the retail price. Other than some buying tips - make sure you have enough room to store your new acquisitions, and confirm that your spouse is on board with it - I have nothing to say about hosting. So I'll defer to the folks at First Alert, who appear to know how to do this correctly. Time it right. Many neighborhoods schedule an annual date for all homes and neighbors to participate and will promote the date on your behalf.
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