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NEWS
March 20, 2006 | By Elisa Ung INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
Lawnside, a tiny, quiet borough in Camden County, is the latest ground zero in the war over eminent domain. Some say it's also an example of how politics infiltrates redevelopment, with a mix that includes a powerful state senator, a potential developer who served prison time, and families fighting displacement. Officials in Lawnside, a historically African American community that was a stop on the Underground Railroad, would like to redevelop 120 acres near the Woodcrest PATCO High-Speed Line station.
NEWS
March 4, 1990 | By Peter Finn, Special to The Inquirer
There was so little time and so much to say. Memories tumbled from the stage in Lawnside School Tuesday as residents celebrated the borough's experience as a historic black municipality. "I could go on and on," Helen Williams Morales told the crowd of more than 200. And she probably could. When Morris Smith, the host for the evening, gently reminded her that she would have to finish up, her reminiscences had reached only to her year in second grade. Morales, a senior citizen, had a lot of tales left to tell.
NEWS
February 25, 2013
A 32-year-old Camden man was fatally shot inside a Lawnside home early Saturday, according to the Camden County Prosecutor's Office. Stephon Cushion was shot several times at his girlfriend's house in the 400 block of Company Street about 3:30 a.m. The gunman fled after the shooting, authorities said. Cushion's girlfriend and another woman were not hurt. Prosecutors said that Cushion and the gunman may have known each other. Anyone with information is asked to contact Camden County investigator Janene Bahr at 856-225-8500 or by e-mail at toccpotips@ccprosecutor.org . - Kathy Boccella  
NEWS
July 4, 2013 | By Darran Simon, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Lawnside police lieutenant was charged Tuesday with official misconduct after he allegedly failed to notify authorities of a suspect's confession   about   his role in a Salem County homicide, the Camden County Prosecutor's Office said. Lloyd Lewis, 44, the highest- ranking member of department, also was charged with tampering with evidence and public records. The accusation stems from an alleged   exchange five years ago between Lewis and Lee Williams Jr., who was then wanted in connection with the homicide.
NEWS
August 31, 1988 | By William H. Sokolic, Special to The Inquirer
Plans to construct a $3.5 million four-story office building in a largely undeveloped section of Cherry Hill are nearly complete, pending final arrangements with Lawnside for a tie-in with that borough's sewer system. The unusual arrangement was born out of necessity. The site, in the Woodcrest section, has no infrastructure to support a hookup with the Camden County Municipal Utilities Authority's regional system - despite the fact that both Lawnside and the rest of Woodcrest came on line in September 1987.
NEWS
March 12, 2013
Authorities are asking for the public's help in identifying a man suspected of placing a device designed to look like a bomb in the Lawnside Municipal Building on Thursday. Someone put a bag containing a pair of flares taped to two pipes in the Camden County building's elevator between 7 and 7:15 a.m., police said. Mayor Mary Ann Wardlow's name was written on it. Further investigation determined the device was filled with screws, not explosives, and could not be detonated. The suspect was described as a white man about 5 feet, 10 inches tall.
NEWS
February 23, 2013 | By Jonathan Lai, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Camden County Prosecutor's Office said Friday that it was investigating the death of a 47-year-old man in Lawnside police custody Thursday night. Rodney Terry of Williamstown was arrested around 6:30 p.m. Thursday as he yelled and hurled rocks at a house on South Charleston Avenue, a spokesman for the Prosecutor's Office said in a statement. According to the statement, Terry was handcuffed and put in the back of a police cruiser. Officers called for medical help because of his behavior.
NEWS
March 9, 2013 | By Darran Simon, Inquirer Staff Writer
The pair of flares taped to two pipes in the resealable storage bag sitting in the elevator in Lawnside's borough hall looked threatening enough. There was what looked like a timer; the mayor's name was on a white label. Mayor Mary Ann Wardlow, who has served on the council for more than two decades, had left the building at 8:30 p.m. Wednesday. The device wasn't in the elevator then, the Camden County Prosecutor's Office and Lawnside police said. On Thursday, the municipal court clerk discovered the device shortly before 8:30 a.m. as she headed to the elevator to the second-floor courtroom.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 9, 2016 | By Allison Steele, Staff Writer
Mark Bryant, the longtime CEO of Camden's community health center, CAMcare, has been ousted from the organization. Though Bryant's name still appears on CAMcare's website as "President/CEO," Bryant confirmed Friday that he was suspended from his job last November and terminated in early March. Speaking from his home in Lawnside, the borough where he served as mayor for 20 years, Bryant declined to elaborate on the circumstances surrounding his departure. The president of CAMcare's board of trustees, Duane Myers, said he could not comment in any way on Bryant's current relationship to the federally funded organization.
NEWS
June 12, 2015 | By Michael Boren, Inquirer Staff Writer
A rash of heroin overdoses in Camden this month has ambulances scrambling from call to call, and one EMS worker says it's one of the worst outbreaks he has seen in his 29 years on the job. University Hospital EMS, which handles calls in Camden, has responded to 50 heroin overdoses this month - nearly the total from all of last month, when there were 60. The overdoses this month have led to the deaths of four individuals, authorities said. "We're getting inundated," said Donald Fisher, EMS operations coordinator for Camden.
NEWS
September 19, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sinkler A. Casselle Sr., 93, of Deptford, a naval architect at the former Philadelphia Naval Shipyard from 1950 to 1977, died Sunday, Sept. 7, at Inspira Medical Center in Woodbury. Mr. Casselle was involved with "the design and development of submarines; he helped with the structural design of them," a niece, Melanie Wright, said. He won an award from the Portsmouth (N.H.) Naval Shipyard for his work on the submarine Jack in 1961, she said. He won an outstanding service award from the Navy Yard in 1966 for development of a sonar detection system for submarines, she said.
NEWS
August 28, 2014 | By Melanie Burney, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Camden man accused in a gunrunning operation that allegedly transported illegal guns from South Carolina to South Jersey will remain in custody awaiting trial. Joseph Rutling, 23, made his first appearance Tuesday before U.S. Magistrate Judge Joel Schneider. At the brief hearing, Rutling waived a preliminary hearing on charges of dealing in firearms and possession of a firearm by a felon. Rutling faces up to 15 years in prison and a $500,000 fine if convicted on both counts. He was returned to the Camden County Jail, where he is serving a 364-day sentence on an unrelated weapons conviction.
NEWS
August 7, 2014 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
Members of a South Jersey gun-trafficking ring bought guns in South Carolina, brought them to New Jersey via Amtrak, and sold them in Camden, Clementon, and Lawnside, the U.S. Attorney's Office said Tuesday, announcing charges against six people. The arrests came after an investigation, begun in April 2013, in which Special Agent Renee Repasky of the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives oversaw a confidential informant's purchase of more than 20 weapons, including handguns, shotguns, rifles, and, in one case, an assault rifle.
NEWS
August 4, 2014 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
I miss the stylized, oversize, two-sided cutout of a white horse that was recently removed from a tower overlooking the White Horse Pike near I-295 in Lawnside. And I'm not alone. "It was a significant landmark," says David Zallie, whose new ShopRite is an anchor tenant in the Lawnside retail strip where the tower now stands topless. "It was symbolic of South Jersey being a unique area," says Sally Lilychild Willowbee, author of Found Artists , a book about discovering unusual, handmade objets d'art on the region's highways.
NEWS
July 25, 2014 | By Clark Mindock, Inquirer Staff Writer
The walls are a splash of warm colors, with whimsical figures playing piano, a flowing upright bass, and a saxophone. They are a tribute to the history of Lawnside, a time when lenient liquor laws brought partyers and jazz enthusiasts across the Delaware to munch on ribs, sip drinks, and relax. The borough was a meeting ground for blacks and whites alike from the 1920s to 1970s, when the country was scrutinizing segregation and contemplating the future of race relations. The music that fills the dining room of Rochester's on summer Friday nights in 2014 serves a different purpose.
NEWS
May 22, 2014 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
A chance encounter in the aisles of his supermarket led ShopRite owner David Zallie to donate $25,000 to the Lawnside Education Foundation. Zallie already had been introduced to foundation president Sandra Strothers when they "bumped into each other while she was shopping during the holidays," he said. "We said, 'Let's make it a point to meet.' " They did. The result - celebrated during a ceremony Tuesday at the Lawnside Public School - fulfills the private, nonprofit foundation's inaugural fund-raising goal of $50,000.
NEWS
April 14, 2014 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
In the months before his death, the Rev. James A. Benson kept working on exhibits for his museum in Lawnside. "He was sick in the hospital, cutting things out of the newspaper and using the nurses' tape," Benson's widow, Ellen, recalls. "He was always asking, 'What's going on at the museum?' " A retired Lawnside postmaster, she's grateful that her husband - who was 81 when he died of leukemia Dec. 8 - doesn't have to hear the answer to his frequent question. The Benson History Museum he founded, owned, and operated (at no charge to visitors)
NEWS
December 14, 2013 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
"What were most important" to the Rev. James A. Benson, according to his daughter, "were God, family, and his museum. " Mr. Benson, 81, who built the Benson Multi-Cultural History Museum in his hometown of Lawnside and was a minister for three decades, died Sunday, Dec. 8, at Virtua Voorhees hospital. He had been ill for a long time, said Bethany Benson King, the youngest of his three daughters. "The museum," she said, "became his legacy. " "He was a minister, an A.M.E., for 30 years, and he made quite an impact on the community through that," she said.
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