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NEWS
March 15, 2002
IT'S NOT SURPRISING that many people in Chester County are upset at a judge's ruling that a plaque listing the Ten Commandments must be taken down from outside the county courthouse: It feels like a slap at Judaism and Christianity, because the commandments are the centerpiece of both religions. That's the very reason why it's unconstitutional to post them on a public building. It proclaims government support of religion that is expressly forbidden by the U.S. Constitution. But how many of the good people out there know that the county commissioners have argued essentially that God has no part in the Commandments, that they are a historic, secular document.
NEWS
March 25, 2012 | N.C. Scott W. Gaylord and Thomas J. Molony ?teach at the Elon University School of Law in Greensboro
Scott W. Gaylord and Thomas J. Molony?are both professors at the Elon University School of Law in Greensboro, N.C. The next wave of abortion regulation has arrived. Pennsylvania currently is considering whether to join 23 states that already have laws regulating - and in some cases requiring - the use of ultrasounds in connection with abortion procedures. Similar legislation is pending in nine other states, and the trend shows no sign of stopping. The ultrasound laws are being hotly debated in state capitals and roundly criticized on editorial pages.
NEWS
July 16, 1992 | By Laura Spinale, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The Central Bucks school board has appointed Assistant Superintendent N. Robert Laws to fill the soon-to-be-vacated superintendent's spot. The appointment was approved in a 7-2 vote Tuesday. Laws was awarded a four-year contract at a starting salary of $95,000 a year. He will take office Aug. 1. Board members Charles D. Baker and Donna L. Faunce opposed the appointment. Baker wanted the district to conduct an outside search for a candidate. Faunce said Laws' starting salary was too high.
NEWS
October 11, 1995 | YONG KIM/ DAILY NEWS
Rita Adessa was at the podium yesterday alongside the Liberty Bell, where she and many others spoke against Colorado's Amendment 2, a measure designed to keep communities in that state from passing laws protecting the rights of homosexuals. Adessa is executive director of the Philadelphia Lesbian and Gay Task Force. Other speakers included lawyers, public officials, teachers, union leaders and clergy. The U.S. Supreme Court is hearing an appeal of the amendment.
BUSINESS
July 16, 1991 | by Rose DeWolf, Daily News Staff Writer
If minimum wage laws, job safety laws, overtime regulations and such are good for employees in American businesses, it stands to reason they are good for employees of America's Congress, too, says the Washington-based National Federation of Independent Business. Complaining that Congress has "systematically exempted itself from nearly every major civil rights and labor law passed in the past 50 years," the group has launched a campaign to make Congress abide by its own laws. Such as: 1. Civil Rights Act; 2. Americans With Disabilities Act; 3. Equal Employment Opportunity Act; 4. Equal Pay Act; 5. Fair Labor Standards Act; 6. National Labor Relations Act; 7. Occupational Safety and Health Act; 8. Social Security Act; 9. Civil Rights Restoration Act; and 10. Age Discrimination Act. Explained Mary Reed, legislative representative of NFIB: "Even those laws that do cover Congressional employees do not permit those employees to sue their employer in federal district court (as private employees can)
NEWS
February 27, 1992 | BY GERALD A. SMITH
I have just read Al Barkins' Guest Opinion, "Making our streets safe," in which he expresses his views on gun control. He starts off OK, but he goes downhill rapidly after the first three or so paragraphs. He appears to be a fairly intelligent person honestly looking for a middle ground on gun control. He states that the National Rifle Association is "right on" when it states that the myriad state laws regulating gun control haven't made a significant dent in this carnage. Yet he proposes more laws against the sportsmen.
NEWS
July 18, 2013 | Manuel Roig-Franzia and Sari Horwitz, Washington Post
ORLANDO, Fla. - Attorney General Eric H. Holder Jr. strongly condemned "Stand Your Ground" laws Tuesday, saying the measures "senselessly expand the concept of self-defense" and may encourage "violent situations to escalate. " On the books in more than 30 states, the statutes have become a focal point of a complicated national debate over race, crime, and culpability following the shooting of Trayvon Martin, an unarmed 17-year-old, by a neighborhood watch volunteer in Sanford, Fla. The volunteer, George Zimmerman, was acquitted of murder charges on Saturday.
NEWS
September 1, 1986
In his complaining Aug. 25 Op-ed Page article "There's a Catch-22 in airport parking," Dan Rottenberg admits that he broke the law when he left his car in a no-parking zone. If his daughter's bags were too heavy for her, she could have used a portable and collapsible lightweight wheeled carrier, a type which my wife and I have carried all over the world for years and available everywhere. The three-minute limit at the airport pickup area was decided upon to keep traffic moving in a congested area.
NEWS
June 6, 2003
EVERYBODY in the city wants to control other people. There's too many bills. The solutio to any problem? Introduce a bill. It's ridiculous. Lawmakers try to "get inside you," make you walk, dictate the way you talk, and how you act. BACK OFF! If you were any closer, you'd be wearing my clothes! Sam Katz wants to introduce a bill about skateboards - and there's still a bike problem. It all has to do with the ignorance of the operator. There is no bike patrol.
NEWS
February 5, 2015
STATE TREASURER Rob McCord was obviously a desperate man last spring. His bid for the Democratic nomination for governor was lagging. He had already put $2 million of his own money into his campaign. But, he needed more - mostly to pay for a series of scummy TV commercials he was launching against the clear front-runner in the race, Tom Wolf. So, what did he do? He started pressuring would-be givers to write big checks to his campaign. It wasn't exactly pay-to-play. It was more like pay . . . or else.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 26, 2015 | By Laura McCrystal, Inquirer Staff Writer
Terry Newton does not usually trust police officers. But after his 28-year-old son was shot and killed in Norristown last month, he found comfort at an unexpected place: the police station. Norristown police Chief Mark Talbot stood among Newton's family. He expressed sympathy for the death of Keithon Majors. He made eye contact. He answered questions. "It was almost like I was in his living room," Newton said. That approach is typical for Talbot. In his first 18 months on the job, the chief has worked to transform his department and overcome what borough officials called a long-standing lack of trust between residents and police.
NEWS
May 22, 2015 | By Steve and Mia
Q: My father-in-law, who lives with us, asked me if my husband and I were having sex because he said he hadn't heard any noises coming from our bedroom. I was caught off guard and didn't answer him. Ever since, I've felt uncomfortable when my husband and I are making love in our bedroom. I feel like my father-in-law is listening at the door. He's disabled and can't afford to live on his own. I resent him being in my house all day snooping on our sex lives. How should I handle this? I want to put him out, but my husband wouldn't stand for it.  Mia: Find a senior-citizen apartment that he can move into.
BUSINESS
May 20, 2015 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
Is the billable hour, long a staple of the legal industry, going the way of the passenger pigeon, the woolly mammoth and the Pyrenean ibex, extinct species all? Under intense client pressure to justify charges following the stock market crash of 2008, law firms took the first steps during the recession toward moving away from hourly charges by offering clients flat fees or by billing based on case outcomes. Now, the flat-fee movement is gaining momentum, with many big firms employing staffs of MBAs, actuaries and other finance experts to price legal engagements and then to make sure lawyers assigned to these matters stay on budget.
BUSINESS
May 19, 2015 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Lawyers for Gov. Wolf , who campaigned for competitive bidding and lower fees in state legal contracts, told one of the state's biggest employers to hire three Philadelphia law firms - not just the one it wanted - as a condition for routine state and federal tax breaks last month. Back in March, the University of Pennsylvania Health System wanted to borrow up to $400 million for building projects in Philadelphia, Chester County Hospital , and Radnor outpatient offices.
NEWS
May 19, 2015 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
Andrew Towne, 33, was eating lunch in a tent at base camp on Mount Everest when the ground beneath him began to sway. He and others scrambled out of the tent, said Towne, a new graduate of the University of Pennsylvania. That's when "we saw this wall of snow descending to the north. " The avalanche that followed would bury large areas of base camp, killing 19 climbers - just a fraction of the devastation in Nepal, where that magnitude-7.8 earthquake on April 25 and a second one on May 12 left more than 8,000 dead and 20,000 injured and destroyed 489,000 homes.
NEWS
May 5, 2015 | By Kathy Boccella, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sara Byala, mother of a third grader at Wayne Elementary School, is looking forward to the class' Walk Through Wayne field trip this month. She and her husband even took the day off to chaperone the children as they tour shops in the small town and maybe make their own pizzas at a local restaurant. And she will have a chance to do it again in a few years with a younger daughter: That's provided Byala is willing to be fingerprinted and undergo a criminal-background check - thanks to a new state law passed after the Jerry Sandusky scandal.
NEWS
May 4, 2015 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
When Gov. Christie takes his case to the state Supreme Court this week in a dispute over pension funding, his administration will make a highly unusual argument: that a law the governor signed in 2011 is unconstitutional. Legal experts say it's a rare approach, perhaps unprecedented in New Jersey. Lawmakers are closely watching how the Supreme Court will rule; its decision could have significant ramifications for the state budget, for the fiscal year that ends June 30 and for the next.
NEWS
April 30, 2015 | By Ben Finley, Inquirer Staff Writer
Writing that Pennsylvania's General Assembly "fell woefully short of the mark," a federal judge on Tuesday struck down a state law that allowed violent-crime victims to sue offenders over speech that causes "mental anguish. " The six-month-old "Revictimization Relief Act" was aimed at quieting the celebrity of convicted cop-killer Mumia Abu-Jamal. But the law violated offenders' First Amendment rights and was so broadly worded that it could limit the speech of people professing their innocence, wrote Chief Judge Christopher C. Conner of Pennsylvania's Middle District.
NEWS
April 22, 2015 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
WHEN IT COMES to brainstorming sessions on building stronger bonds between law-enforcement officials and the communities they serve, one vital group seems to be missing: Young people. "Any police official will tell you these discussions are dominated by older folks," Deputy Commissioner Richard Ross said yesterday at the U.S. Attorney's Office in Center City after one such discussion. "Without them, we can't get to the core of the issues at hand, and it's clear why: They have the most contact with police.
BUSINESS
April 22, 2015 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
After all the courtroom jostling and legal swordplay, it may in the end come down to this - the word of three witnesses against one. Any day now, Philadelphia Common Pleas Court Judge Paul Panepinto is expected to issue his second and likely final ruling on the $1 million penalty he imposed on insurance defense lawyer Nancy Raynor. This decision has had the city's legal community buzzing. The emerging consensus is that the penalty, unprecedented in its magnitude, isn't justified based on the alleged offense and sets a terrible precedent.
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