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NEWS
August 15, 2016 | By Marie McCullough, Staff Writer
Soon after Pennsylvania's breast density notification law took effect in 2014, Jules Sumkin found himself wanting to spare women from getting a letter that might alarm or perplex them. Twenty-eight states, including New Jersey and Delaware, now have laws that require mammography centers to inform women with dense breast tissue that it may increase the risk of cancer and obscure a malignancy on a mammogram, so they may want to talk to their doctors about extra imaging options. The letters don't mention quandaries that Sumkin, chair of radiology at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, knows too well: There are no guidelines for extra imaging, or any evidence that it saves lives.
NEWS
March 15, 2002
IT'S NOT SURPRISING that many people in Chester County are upset at a judge's ruling that a plaque listing the Ten Commandments must be taken down from outside the county courthouse: It feels like a slap at Judaism and Christianity, because the commandments are the centerpiece of both religions. That's the very reason why it's unconstitutional to post them on a public building. It proclaims government support of religion that is expressly forbidden by the U.S. Constitution. But how many of the good people out there know that the county commissioners have argued essentially that God has no part in the Commandments, that they are a historic, secular document.
NEWS
July 22, 2016 | By Beth Anne Mumford
HOW'S THIS for a head-scratcher: Apparently, out-of-state politicians and activists can be trusted to drink responsibly, but your average Philadelphian can't. For years, our state has endured some of the nation's most needlessly restrictive alcohol regulations, yet well-connected visitors to the Democratic National Convention next week will get special exceptions. State legislators in Harrisburg have implemented temporary "national event permits" for the duration of the convention, allowing select Philadelphia venues to sell alcohol later than 2 a.m., provide happy hour specials, and purchase their stock outside of state stores.
NEWS
July 16, 1992 | By Laura Spinale, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The Central Bucks school board has appointed Assistant Superintendent N. Robert Laws to fill the soon-to-be-vacated superintendent's spot. The appointment was approved in a 7-2 vote Tuesday. Laws was awarded a four-year contract at a starting salary of $95,000 a year. He will take office Aug. 1. Board members Charles D. Baker and Donna L. Faunce opposed the appointment. Baker wanted the district to conduct an outside search for a candidate. Faunce said Laws' starting salary was too high.
NEWS
October 11, 1995 | YONG KIM/ DAILY NEWS
Rita Adessa was at the podium yesterday alongside the Liberty Bell, where she and many others spoke against Colorado's Amendment 2, a measure designed to keep communities in that state from passing laws protecting the rights of homosexuals. Adessa is executive director of the Philadelphia Lesbian and Gay Task Force. Other speakers included lawyers, public officials, teachers, union leaders and clergy. The U.S. Supreme Court is hearing an appeal of the amendment.
BUSINESS
July 16, 1991 | by Rose DeWolf, Daily News Staff Writer
If minimum wage laws, job safety laws, overtime regulations and such are good for employees in American businesses, it stands to reason they are good for employees of America's Congress, too, says the Washington-based National Federation of Independent Business. Complaining that Congress has "systematically exempted itself from nearly every major civil rights and labor law passed in the past 50 years," the group has launched a campaign to make Congress abide by its own laws. Such as: 1. Civil Rights Act; 2. Americans With Disabilities Act; 3. Equal Employment Opportunity Act; 4. Equal Pay Act; 5. Fair Labor Standards Act; 6. National Labor Relations Act; 7. Occupational Safety and Health Act; 8. Social Security Act; 9. Civil Rights Restoration Act; and 10. Age Discrimination Act. Explained Mary Reed, legislative representative of NFIB: "Even those laws that do cover Congressional employees do not permit those employees to sue their employer in federal district court (as private employees can)
NEWS
March 25, 2012 | N.C. Scott W. Gaylord and Thomas J. Molony ?teach at the Elon University School of Law in Greensboro
Scott W. Gaylord and Thomas J. Molony?are both professors at the Elon University School of Law in Greensboro, N.C. The next wave of abortion regulation has arrived. Pennsylvania currently is considering whether to join 23 states that already have laws regulating - and in some cases requiring - the use of ultrasounds in connection with abortion procedures. Similar legislation is pending in nine other states, and the trend shows no sign of stopping. The ultrasound laws are being hotly debated in state capitals and roundly criticized on editorial pages.
NEWS
February 27, 1992 | BY GERALD A. SMITH
I have just read Al Barkins' Guest Opinion, "Making our streets safe," in which he expresses his views on gun control. He starts off OK, but he goes downhill rapidly after the first three or so paragraphs. He appears to be a fairly intelligent person honestly looking for a middle ground on gun control. He states that the National Rifle Association is "right on" when it states that the myriad state laws regulating gun control haven't made a significant dent in this carnage. Yet he proposes more laws against the sportsmen.
NEWS
July 18, 2013 | Manuel Roig-Franzia and Sari Horwitz, Washington Post
ORLANDO, Fla. - Attorney General Eric H. Holder Jr. strongly condemned "Stand Your Ground" laws Tuesday, saying the measures "senselessly expand the concept of self-defense" and may encourage "violent situations to escalate. " On the books in more than 30 states, the statutes have become a focal point of a complicated national debate over race, crime, and culpability following the shooting of Trayvon Martin, an unarmed 17-year-old, by a neighborhood watch volunteer in Sanford, Fla. The volunteer, George Zimmerman, was acquitted of murder charges on Saturday.
NEWS
September 1, 1986
In his complaining Aug. 25 Op-ed Page article "There's a Catch-22 in airport parking," Dan Rottenberg admits that he broke the law when he left his car in a no-parking zone. If his daughter's bags were too heavy for her, she could have used a portable and collapsible lightweight wheeled carrier, a type which my wife and I have carried all over the world for years and available everywhere. The three-minute limit at the airport pickup area was decided upon to keep traffic moving in a congested area.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 18, 2016 | By Andrew Seidman, TRENTON BUREAU
TRENTON - Gov. Christie offered his "unequivocal" support for Israel on Tuesday, signing into law legislation that prohibits the state Treasury Department from investing public employee pension funds in companies that boycott the U.S. ally. The law is a rejection of the "boycott, divestment, and sanctions" movement against Israel that Palestinians and other supporters launched a decade ago to, as the movement puts it, "pressure Israel to comply with international law. " "Unequivocal, unashamed, unapologetic support of Israel is the policy of the State of New Jersey - and should be the policy of the United States of America, and hopefully will be in the years going forward," Christie, a Republican, said at a Statehouse news conference.
NEWS
August 15, 2016 | By Scott Sturgis, Staff Writer
Night workers like Mr. Driver's Seat rejoice in the mostly empty highways and quiet streets of the Philadelphia region well after dark. The only downside: Stoplights that don't seem to know you exist, a feeling that bicycle and motorcycle riders probably know any time of day. You see the sign that says, "Stop here on red," with the thick white stripe just in front of it. Maybe you even see the outline of the sensor, so you know you're in the right...
NEWS
August 15, 2016 | By Marie McCullough, Staff Writer
Soon after Pennsylvania's breast density notification law took effect in 2014, Jules Sumkin found himself wanting to spare women from getting a letter that might alarm or perplex them. Twenty-eight states, including New Jersey and Delaware, now have laws that require mammography centers to inform women with dense breast tissue that it may increase the risk of cancer and obscure a malignancy on a mammogram, so they may want to talk to their doctors about extra imaging options. The letters don't mention quandaries that Sumkin, chair of radiology at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, knows too well: There are no guidelines for extra imaging, or any evidence that it saves lives.
NEWS
August 9, 2016 | By Jonathan Lai, Staff Writer
A new law to help prevent suicide by students at New Jersey colleges brings needed attention to an important campus issue, school administrators said, while also giving them support to expand services. Gov. Christie last week signed into law the Madison Holleran Suicide Prevention Act, named after a 19-year-old University of Pennsylvania student from Bergen County who killed herself in 2014 in Philadelphia. "An institution of higher education shall have individuals with training and experience in mental-health issues who focus on reducing student suicides and attempted suicides available on campus or remotely by telephone or other means for students 24 hours a day, seven days a week," the law reads . The law also requires schools to train faculty and staff to recognize suicide warning signs and to email students each semester with contact information for the trained staffers.
NEWS
August 7, 2016 | By Carolyn Hax, Advice Columnist
Adapted from a recent online discussion. Question: My husband's sister "Beth" fancies herself a psychic of sorts who can communicate with the beyond. A few months ago, we were eating dinner when she began talking about a spirit with me. I honestly had no idea who she was talking about, and told her that, as I had no deceased relatives or friends who fit her description. Beth became very upset, claiming she was overwhelmed with what the spirit was trying to tell her. She was so upset she ran from the room to lie in a dark room and compose herself.
BUSINESS
August 5, 2016 | By Chris Mondics, Staff Writer
Most law firms would consider it noteworthy if just one of their cases became a front-page story. But for Schnader Harrison Segal & Lewis, the Center City law firm, that has happened three times in recent months. Given the notoriety of the matters - all are criminal cases - they likely will remain in the public eye for some time. Schnader's lawyers have gone to bat for former U.S. Rep. Chaka Fattah, who is expected to appeal his conviction in June on federal corruption charges; former Pennsylvania State University president Graham Spanier, who is fending off criminal charges that he failed to go to the police with evidence that former assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky had sexually assaulted a minor; and comedian Bill Cosby, who is facing sexual-assault charges in Montgomery County.
NEWS
August 2, 2016 | By Emma Platoff, Staff Writer
On June 7, in a funky upstairs office at the SoHa Arts Building in Haddon Township, Alex Law choked back tears - not entirely successfully - as he thanked a room full of volunteers for their efforts on his congressional campaign, an effort that he had just learned failed by 40 points. In the eight weeks since he lost a hard-fought primary to incumbent Rep. Donald Norcross, Law, 25, has moved into a new apartment in Collingswood, free-lanced as a consultant for small businesses in Pennsylvania, New York, and New Jersey, and made public appearances with likely 2017 gubernatorial candidate Steve Fulop.
NEWS
July 28, 2016
THE PARENTS: Maria Laws, 50, and Lynell Laws, 51, of Chadds Ford THE CHILD: Elijah Lynell, 8 months, adopted May 11, 2016 HOW LONG IT TOOK LYNELL TO PERFECT HIS FAMILY'S RECIPE FOR A MODIFIED BRIOCHE: 27 years It was her mother who told Maria to stop pushing so hard. Stop trying - after four miscarriages, one of them life-threatening - to get pregnant, her mother advised. Stop trying - after one birth mother, pregnant with twins, changed her mind - to hurry the adoption process.
NEWS
July 28, 2016
Somehow the rumor had spread that former U.S. Rep. Marjorie Margolies of Montgomery County would be introducing Hillary Clinton on Thursday night. "Everybody is saying good luck with your speech," she said. A nice thought, but not true. She is, however, the mother-in-law of the person introducing Hillary Clinton: Chelsea Clinton, who married Margolies' son Marc Mezvinsky in 2010. Margolies, who cast the deciding vote in favor of Bill Clinton's 1993 budget, then was defeated in the next election, is busy enough this week.
NEWS
July 27, 2016 | Mary C. Curtis
IN POLITICS, nuance is often a negative, particularly in the middle of a cutthroat presidential campaign. So while Hillary Clinton's position - supporting and sympathizing with both police officers and the mothers of African Americans killed in encounters with police - is a reasonable one, it doesn't quite fit on a bumper sticker. It's about criminal justice and race and trust and perceptions it would take a pile of history books to start to untangle. On the other hand, "law and order," the mantra often repeated by GOP nominee Donald Trump in Cleveland at the Republican convention, fits just fine.
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