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NEWS
March 15, 2002
IT'S NOT SURPRISING that many people in Chester County are upset at a judge's ruling that a plaque listing the Ten Commandments must be taken down from outside the county courthouse: It feels like a slap at Judaism and Christianity, because the commandments are the centerpiece of both religions. That's the very reason why it's unconstitutional to post them on a public building. It proclaims government support of religion that is expressly forbidden by the U.S. Constitution. But how many of the good people out there know that the county commissioners have argued essentially that God has no part in the Commandments, that they are a historic, secular document.
NEWS
July 16, 1992 | By Laura Spinale, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The Central Bucks school board has appointed Assistant Superintendent N. Robert Laws to fill the soon-to-be-vacated superintendent's spot. The appointment was approved in a 7-2 vote Tuesday. Laws was awarded a four-year contract at a starting salary of $95,000 a year. He will take office Aug. 1. Board members Charles D. Baker and Donna L. Faunce opposed the appointment. Baker wanted the district to conduct an outside search for a candidate. Faunce said Laws' starting salary was too high.
NEWS
October 11, 1995 | YONG KIM/ DAILY NEWS
Rita Adessa was at the podium yesterday alongside the Liberty Bell, where she and many others spoke against Colorado's Amendment 2, a measure designed to keep communities in that state from passing laws protecting the rights of homosexuals. Adessa is executive director of the Philadelphia Lesbian and Gay Task Force. Other speakers included lawyers, public officials, teachers, union leaders and clergy. The U.S. Supreme Court is hearing an appeal of the amendment.
NEWS
March 25, 2012 | N.C. Scott W. Gaylord and Thomas J. Molony ?teach at the Elon University School of Law in Greensboro
Scott W. Gaylord and Thomas J. Molony?are both professors at the Elon University School of Law in Greensboro, N.C. The next wave of abortion regulation has arrived. Pennsylvania currently is considering whether to join 23 states that already have laws regulating - and in some cases requiring - the use of ultrasounds in connection with abortion procedures. Similar legislation is pending in nine other states, and the trend shows no sign of stopping. The ultrasound laws are being hotly debated in state capitals and roundly criticized on editorial pages.
BUSINESS
July 16, 1991 | by Rose DeWolf, Daily News Staff Writer
If minimum wage laws, job safety laws, overtime regulations and such are good for employees in American businesses, it stands to reason they are good for employees of America's Congress, too, says the Washington-based National Federation of Independent Business. Complaining that Congress has "systematically exempted itself from nearly every major civil rights and labor law passed in the past 50 years," the group has launched a campaign to make Congress abide by its own laws. Such as: 1. Civil Rights Act; 2. Americans With Disabilities Act; 3. Equal Employment Opportunity Act; 4. Equal Pay Act; 5. Fair Labor Standards Act; 6. National Labor Relations Act; 7. Occupational Safety and Health Act; 8. Social Security Act; 9. Civil Rights Restoration Act; and 10. Age Discrimination Act. Explained Mary Reed, legislative representative of NFIB: "Even those laws that do cover Congressional employees do not permit those employees to sue their employer in federal district court (as private employees can)
NEWS
February 27, 1992 | BY GERALD A. SMITH
I have just read Al Barkins' Guest Opinion, "Making our streets safe," in which he expresses his views on gun control. He starts off OK, but he goes downhill rapidly after the first three or so paragraphs. He appears to be a fairly intelligent person honestly looking for a middle ground on gun control. He states that the National Rifle Association is "right on" when it states that the myriad state laws regulating gun control haven't made a significant dent in this carnage. Yet he proposes more laws against the sportsmen.
NEWS
July 18, 2013 | Manuel Roig-Franzia and Sari Horwitz, Washington Post
ORLANDO, Fla. - Attorney General Eric H. Holder Jr. strongly condemned "Stand Your Ground" laws Tuesday, saying the measures "senselessly expand the concept of self-defense" and may encourage "violent situations to escalate. " On the books in more than 30 states, the statutes have become a focal point of a complicated national debate over race, crime, and culpability following the shooting of Trayvon Martin, an unarmed 17-year-old, by a neighborhood watch volunteer in Sanford, Fla. The volunteer, George Zimmerman, was acquitted of murder charges on Saturday.
NEWS
September 1, 1986
In his complaining Aug. 25 Op-ed Page article "There's a Catch-22 in airport parking," Dan Rottenberg admits that he broke the law when he left his car in a no-parking zone. If his daughter's bags were too heavy for her, she could have used a portable and collapsible lightweight wheeled carrier, a type which my wife and I have carried all over the world for years and available everywhere. The three-minute limit at the airport pickup area was decided upon to keep traffic moving in a congested area.
NEWS
June 6, 2003
EVERYBODY in the city wants to control other people. There's too many bills. The solutio to any problem? Introduce a bill. It's ridiculous. Lawmakers try to "get inside you," make you walk, dictate the way you talk, and how you act. BACK OFF! If you were any closer, you'd be wearing my clothes! Sam Katz wants to introduce a bill about skateboards - and there's still a bike problem. It all has to do with the ignorance of the operator. There is no bike patrol.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 23, 2016 | By Maria Panaritis, Staff Writer
Freshly appointed to the helm of an office racked by tumult, Pennsylvania Attorney General Bruce Beemer is rejecting a key position taken by his predecessor, saying he believes a child sex-abuse bill in Harrisburg that would have allowed lawsuits for decades-old cases would not have violated the state constitution. In an interview, Beemer contradicted the legal view offered by then-Solicitor General Bruce L. Castor Jr., who told a Senate panel in June that he believed the measure, opposed by the Catholic Church, would be rejected by the Supreme Court.
NEWS
September 23, 2016 | By Carolyn Hax, Advice Columnist
Adapted from a recent online discussion. Question: I had my baby (the first grandchild on both sides) two weeks ago. She is premature and still in the hospital. My in-laws came to see her and to help us out during this stressful time. I was chatting with my mother-in-law yesterday about how I knew it was frustrating for them when there are many rules in the special-care nursery. I said, "At least you got to hold the baby, though. " She looked me in the eyes and said, "No, I didn't!"
NEWS
September 22, 2016 | By Maria Panaritis, Staff Writer
With the fate of a child sex-abuse bill on the line in Harrisburg, clergy sex-abuse victims and their relatives told their stories Tuesday as part of a renewed push to change Pennsylvania law so victims can sue for decades-old attacks. A bill that passed the House in April would have, among other things, expanded the statute of limitations so victims age 50 and under could sue the men or women who abused them decades ago, as well as the institutions that supervised them. Citing concerns about its constitutionality and after critics, notably the Catholic Church, warned the measure could unfairly cripple some parishes, the Senate removed that provision.
NEWS
September 22, 2016 | By Karen Langley, HARRISBURG BUREAU
HARRISBURG - The Pennsylvania House once again is considering a bill that would allow gun enthusiasts and organizations such as the National Rifle Association to sue municipalities over local firearm restrictions. The House Judiciary Committee on Tuesday voted 21-6 to send the full House a bill that would permit state residents who may legally possess a firearm, and also membership organizations, to seek relief in the courts and to be awarded legal expenses if they win. A similar proposal became law in 2014, but Commonwealth Court overturned it because of objections to the process used to pass the proposal.
NEWS
September 18, 2016 | By Natalie Pompilio, For The Inquirer
Ruth Rodriguez has two jobs, one full time on weekdays and one part time on weekends. The difference in how the two employers treat nursing mothers like her is striking. Monday through Friday, Rodriguez, 43, can access a private room with a locked door twice a day to express milk for 10-month-old Mateo. On weekends, she spends her 15-minute break pumping milk while standing over a sink in the company bathroom. "I'm sure it's not sanitary," said Rodriguez, of North Philadelphia, who asked that her employers not be identified.
BUSINESS
September 13, 2016 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Staff Writer
If local mutual-fund giant Vanguard doesn't like a new Pennsylvania law on retirement accounts, will the state reverse it? We're about to find out. The law, which took effect Saturday, allows Pennsylvania to seize some retirement accounts three years after they're presumed abandoned - regardless of the account owner's age. Previously, the state waited until individuals reached age 701/2 before seizing retirement accounts and liquidating the...
NEWS
September 11, 2016 | By Carolyn Hax, Advice Columnist
Question: My husband and I recently had our first baby. My husband's brother and his wife are happily child-free and have shown zero interest in our daughter - they've never interacted with her, never ask about her, never respond to the few pictures my husband sends them, and have told us outright they "don't like babies. " I don't expect them to act like she is the center of their world, but our extended family is tiny, and we'd hoped our daughter would have a strong relationship with her aunt and uncle.
NEWS
September 11, 2016 | By Julie Shaw, Staff Writer
A brother-in-law of reputed mob associate Ronald Galati Sr. pleaded guilty Friday to charges of insurance fraud and conspiracy in a widespread scheme spearheaded by Galati. Joseph Clark, 59, of the 2500 block of Garnet Street in South Philadelphia - the same block on which Galati lived - was sentenced under a plea deal to five years of probation and ordered to pay $12,000 in restitution. Under the deal, the probation can end after restitution is paid. Galati, 65 - who is serving federal prison time for trying to have his daughter's then-boyfriend killed in Atlantic City in November 2013 - pleaded no contest Wednesday to corrupt organization, theft, and related charges in the insurance-fraud case.
NEWS
September 6, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
Stephen John Anderer, 52, of Wynnewood, a leading expert on family law and child custody, died Aug. 28 while competing in the Cedar Island 5K Swim in Avalon. A gifted athlete, Dr. Anderer was in the third leg of the sunset swim around the island when he felt some discomfort, law partner Mark A. Momjian said. Rescuers in a boat pulled Dr. Anderer from the water and sped to a nearby dock, where paramedics were unable to revive him, Momjian said. The cause of death was atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease.
NEWS
September 2, 2016 | By Carolyn Hax, Advice Columnist
While I'm away, readers give the advice. On the myth of the evil mother-in-law: A few years ago, I wrote you a letter, which you published, thank you, in defense of mothers-in-law. It irked me that so many young wives and mothers seemed to be perpetuating the evil mother-in-law myth, and I believed young women needed to be kinder and gentler and more understanding of their poor mothers-in-laws. Well, now I am embarrassed and ashamed of my fellow middle-age women. I just cannot believe how meddlesome, presumptuous, and whiny some can be, who come to visit and stay too long, who try to drive a wedge between young couples, who think they can dictate how important events should be played out (demanding that a vegetarian bride serve two meat options?
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