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SPORTS
June 20, 2015 | By Mike Jensen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Vince Nicastro, who navigated Villanova through conference-realignment waters and hired Jay Wright as the school's basketball coach, is moving to a new position at the school after 15 years as athletic director. Nicastro said he will stay on until a new athletic director is named. He then will become associate director of the Jeffrey S. Moorad Center for the Study of Sports Law at the Villanova University School of Law. "It's something I've been talking to our president for a couple of months about, what the next chapter would be," Nicastro said Thursday afternoon.
NEWS
June 10, 2015 | By Kathy Boccella, Inquirer Staff Writer
After complaints from schools, youth groups, and others, a state House committee voted overwhelmingly Monday to lessen the scope of a new Pennsylvania law that requires background checks for all those who work or volunteer with children. Voting 24-2, the House Children and Youth Committee approved a bill that would make background checks mandatory for those who have regular contact with children, rather than all workers and the vast majority of volunteers. The House could vote on the bill in the next few days.
NEWS
June 7, 2015 | By Caroline Simon, Inquirer Staff Writer
As authorities hunted the man charged in the fatal stabbing of a Berlin Township woman, friends of the victim and even a state gun rights group weighed in Friday, saying the system had failed to protect Carol Bowne. "In my opinion, the police failed her," said friend Colette Marino-Quinones, noting that the suspect, a boyfriend from whom Bowne was estranged, had not been effectively pursued after he violated a restraining order a month before Wednesday's attack. "Other people had spotted him but the police never did, and I find that interesting," she said.
NEWS
June 4, 2015 | By Caitlin McCabe, Inquirer Staff Writer
Delaware County officials and a state representative disagree about a key piece of state legislation that may play a crucial role in a lawsuit filed by the county. On Tuesday, county officials publicly announced a $41.4 million lawsuit against 19 telecommunication carriers, alleging that the providers violated state law by undercharging customers - particularly medium-size to large businesses - for the number of phone lines they operate. The under-billings are significant, the county alleges, because 911 fees - charged to customers as $1 per month on every line they operate - are not collected and remitted to fund the county's emergency services.
NEWS
June 1, 2015 | By Craig R. McCoy and Angela Couloumbis, Inquirer Staff Writers
Last year, the Pennsylvania Attorney General's Office dropped subpoenas on dozens of nursing homes statewide, demanding facts about their staffing - an opening salvo in a probe that could force the homes to pay big fines. The office says the process will improve conditions and pay off for the state's elderly. Someone else could benefit, too - the Cohen, Milstein, Sellers & Toll law firm. The Washington firm stands to pocket up to $21 million of the first $100 million of any fines extracted by state prosecutors.
NEWS
May 26, 2015 | By Laura McCrystal, Inquirer Staff Writer
Terry Newton does not usually trust police officers. But after his 28-year-old son was shot and killed in Norristown last month, he found comfort at an unexpected place: the police station. Norristown police Chief Mark Talbot stood among Newton's family. He expressed sympathy for the death of Keithon Majors. He made eye contact. He answered questions. "It was almost like I was in his living room," Newton said. That approach is typical for Talbot. In his first 18 months on the job, the chief has worked to transform his department and overcome what borough officials called a long-standing lack of trust between residents and police.
NEWS
May 22, 2015 | By Steve and Mia
Q: My father-in-law, who lives with us, asked me if my husband and I were having sex because he said he hadn't heard any noises coming from our bedroom. I was caught off guard and didn't answer him. Ever since, I've felt uncomfortable when my husband and I are making love in our bedroom. I feel like my father-in-law is listening at the door. He's disabled and can't afford to live on his own. I resent him being in my house all day snooping on our sex lives. How should I handle this? I want to put him out, but my husband wouldn't stand for it.  Mia: Find a senior-citizen apartment that he can move into.
BUSINESS
May 20, 2015 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
Is the billable hour, long a staple of the legal industry, going the way of the passenger pigeon, the woolly mammoth and the Pyrenean ibex, extinct species all? Under intense client pressure to justify charges following the stock market crash of 2008, law firms took the first steps during the recession toward moving away from hourly charges by offering clients flat fees or by billing based on case outcomes. Now, the flat-fee movement is gaining momentum, with many big firms employing staffs of MBAs, actuaries and other finance experts to price legal engagements and then to make sure lawyers assigned to these matters stay on budget.
BUSINESS
May 19, 2015 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Lawyers for Gov. Wolf , who campaigned for competitive bidding and lower fees in state legal contracts, told one of the state's biggest employers to hire three Philadelphia law firms - not just the one it wanted - as a condition for routine state and federal tax breaks last month. Back in March, the University of Pennsylvania Health System wanted to borrow up to $400 million for building projects in Philadelphia, Chester County Hospital , and Radnor outpatient offices.
NEWS
May 19, 2015 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
Andrew Towne, 33, was eating lunch in a tent at base camp on Mount Everest when the ground beneath him began to sway. He and others scrambled out of the tent, said Towne, a new graduate of the University of Pennsylvania. That's when "we saw this wall of snow descending to the north. " The avalanche that followed would bury large areas of base camp, killing 19 climbers - just a fraction of the devastation in Nepal, where that magnitude-7.8 earthquake on April 25 and a second one on May 12 left more than 8,000 dead and 20,000 injured and destroyed 489,000 homes.
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