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NEWS
February 22, 2014 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
LONDON - Jonathan Angell jumped to the London office of Philadelphia-based Dechert L.L.P. four years ago from a British law firm because there was more opportunity to do cross-border deals, the kind of work he finds most interesting. But Angell doesn't necessarily think of Dechert as an American firm with a British office. "National identities have become less important," said Angell, a Dechert partner. "There is discussion from time to time. What are we? We have people here from different jurisdictions.
NEWS
February 21, 2014 | By Angela Couloumbis, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - The state law passed late last year allowing taverns and restaurants to host small games of chance was supposed to be a win for everyone: merchants, bettors, and Gov. Corbett, who is counting on tens of millions of dollars in new gambling taxes. But the numbers disclosed in a budget hearing Wednesday didn't sound like a winning bet. Since the law's passage, only five establishments statewide have even applied for the license. None has been approved. All of which left several senators on the Appropriations Committee in a cold sweat, because the Corbett administration's proposed $29.4 billion budget for the fiscal year beginning July 1 banks on collecting $102 million in revenue from small games of chance.
NEWS
February 21, 2014
I'M PRETTY SURE Michael David Dunn is a racist, but I'm certain he's a dunce who has done me harm. Not the kind of harm he did to 17-year-old Jordan Davis, his friends and family. There is no equivalency between that actual harm and my theoretical harm. The harm Dunn has done to me and other gun owners is to make us look like trigger-happy hot heads, when the opposite is true. How can I say that? With more than 100 million gun owners in America, we'd have thousands of shootings every day if we lacked impulse control, like Dunn.
NEWS
February 21, 2014 | By Helen Ubinas, Daily News Columnist
ARE YOU LOOKING to get punched? That's what a friend asked when I told him I'd tried to convince a few strangers that saving parking spots in Philly is illegal. And, no, I'm not looking for a bruising. But judging by the responses I got, I could see his point. When I broached the subject with spot-saving offenders, people either looked at me like I was high or not from here, both possibilities met with equal amounts of hostility. "What, are you a cop or something?" a young man on Willow Grove Avenue asked as he set out enough lawn chairs for a garden party.
BUSINESS
February 20, 2014 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
As millions of policyholders learned late last year that their health insurance was being canceled, recriminations began to fly. Who was to blame? Was it incompetent, devious Democrats intent on soaking the rich, or menacing Republican saboteurs taking time out from their relentless war on women to take away health care from the poor? Then a new and seemingly soothing narrative emerged. It was sagely suggested that policymakers always understood there would be winners and losers, and anyway, this was all in the service of making health care better in America.
NEWS
February 14, 2014 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Michael Fitts was appointed dean of the University of Pennsylvania Law School in 2000, legal education, like the profession itself, was at the beginning of a years-long boom. Hiring at firms exploded and pay at the most sought-after law firms reached stratospheric levels - starting salaries of $145,000 a year in Philadelphia, and higher in New York, Washington, and Los Angeles. Firms made fortunes charging out young, inexperienced lawyers at rates that fueled burgeoning profits.
NEWS
February 11, 2014 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
New faculty hires at New Jersey's state colleges will have more time to build their research portfolios before being reviewed for tenure, and the schools will have more flexibility when hiring faculty from other institutions under a law that takes effect this summer. The measure, signed by Gov. Christie last month, makes new faculty eligible for tenure after six years, instead of the current five. "It gives you more opportunities to demonstrate excellence," said Phillip A. Lewis, a Rowan University associate marketing professor who serves as negotiator for the faculty union Local 2373.
NEWS
February 8, 2014 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG Legislation crafted to address deadly arsons such as the one that took the life of a Coatesville woman six years ago is poised to become law. A spokesman said Thursday that Gov. Corbett would sign a bill creating the crime of "aggravated arson" to address those who set fires to buildings while knowing that someone is inside. Legislation sponsored by Sen. John Rafferty (R., Montgomery) also will strengthen Pennsylvania's arson laws by setting tougher sentencing guidelines.
NEWS
February 7, 2014 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Jennifer and Dan Shultz adopted a daughter from Africa in November 2012, they brought home a bright and beautiful little girl. They also brought a Congolese birth certificate that was almost certainly incorrect. It said their daughter, Agape, was born in December 2007, making her 4. The couple's doctor and dentist said that was impossible - that Agape's size and growth showed she was likely 7. That discrepancy created all sorts of complications, and threatened to generate more, for Agape and for others like her: older children adopted from chaotic foreign lands where paperwork can be wrong, but who are growing up in a country where an accurate birth date is key to everything from school placements to passports and Social Security.
BUSINESS
February 6, 2014 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
Michael A. Fitts, dean of the University of Pennsylvania law school since 2000, has been named president of Tulane University in New Orleans and will take over there July 1. Penn made the announcement late Tuesday afternoon, praising Fitts' leadership of the law school during a time of significant academic change. "Mike Fitts is an inspired choice to become the next president of Tulane University," Penn president Amy Gutmann said. "He is a skilled and strategic leader whose vision has propelled Penn Law to ever greater heights.
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