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NEWS
March 17, 2014 | By Ben Finley, Inquirer Staff Writer
Drew Ferrara and Connie Kaminski expected flood-insurance premiums to rise in parts of Yardley, a Bucks County river town swamped by three major floods between September 2004 and June 2006. But not by 800 percent. When the insurance bill arrived in December for their two-story real estate office near the Delaware River, they saw premiums jump from about $3,000 a year to nearly $27,000. "The absurdity of it was shocking," Ferrara said. "Who can afford to pay this type of insurance?"
NEWS
March 16, 2014 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
Despite the big titles he held and the grand awards he won, Temple University law professor Edward Ohlbaum was at heart a trial lawyer and teacher, equally comfortable in front of a jury or a classroom. An expert on evidence, an advocate for the American justice system, a defender of children's rights, and the author of three books, Mr. Ohlbaum, 64, died Thursday, March 13, after battling kidney cancer. He kept his medical condition private and continued working until the day before he died.
NEWS
February 28, 2014
WHEN advocates of same-sex marriage pushed their case in the courts of both public opinion and law, they made sure to read the following language from that little card provided to them by the tolerance police: "No one will be forced to violate their religious beliefs if Adam can marry Steve and Madame can marry Eve. " Much like the Miranda warnings that became famous after the Supremes decided that magic words were all that were needed to protect the...
NEWS
February 25, 2014 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
NEW BRUNSWICK Rutgers University president Robert L. Barchi announced a plan a year ago to merge its two law schools, with the ambitious goal of having students this fall enter a unified program. Then came the basketball scandal, which caused personnel changes, including the Newark campus' law dean becoming the university's top lawyer. And then the Camden law school dean announced his coming departure to fill the newly created post of campus provost. At the same time, leadership shuffling at both campuses meant new chancellors would oversee the transition.
BUSINESS
February 23, 2014 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
Reed Smith L.L.P.'s Philadelphia office is set to move its 320 lawyers and support staff from One Liberty Place to new quarters at Three Logan Square. When the move is complete March 3, firm leaders say the firm will occupy about 20 percent less space in a reconfigured office with greater energy efficiency and more opportunities for collaboration. "Aside from the burden of unpacking, we are excited about having brand-new surroundings," said Leonard Bernstein, managing partner of the Philadelphia office.
NEWS
February 22, 2014 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
LONDON - Jonathan Angell jumped to the London office of Philadelphia-based Dechert L.L.P. four years ago from a British law firm because there was more opportunity to do cross-border deals, the kind of work he finds most interesting. But Angell doesn't necessarily think of Dechert as an American firm with a British office. "National identities have become less important," said Angell, a Dechert partner. "There is discussion from time to time. What are we? We have people here from different jurisdictions.
NEWS
February 21, 2014 | By Angela Couloumbis, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - The state law passed late last year allowing taverns and restaurants to host small games of chance was supposed to be a win for everyone: merchants, bettors, and Gov. Corbett, who is counting on tens of millions of dollars in new gambling taxes. But the numbers disclosed in a budget hearing Wednesday didn't sound like a winning bet. Since the law's passage, only five establishments statewide have even applied for the license. None has been approved. All of which left several senators on the Appropriations Committee in a cold sweat, because the Corbett administration's proposed $29.4 billion budget for the fiscal year beginning July 1 banks on collecting $102 million in revenue from small games of chance.
NEWS
February 21, 2014 | By Helen Ubinas, Daily News Columnist
ARE YOU LOOKING to get punched? That's what a friend asked when I told him I'd tried to convince a few strangers that saving parking spots in Philly is illegal. And, no, I'm not looking for a bruising. But judging by the responses I got, I could see his point. When I broached the subject with spot-saving offenders, people either looked at me like I was high or not from here, both possibilities met with equal amounts of hostility. "What, are you a cop or something?" a young man on Willow Grove Avenue asked as he set out enough lawn chairs for a garden party.
NEWS
February 21, 2014
I'M PRETTY SURE Michael David Dunn is a racist, but I'm certain he's a dunce who has done me harm. Not the kind of harm he did to 17-year-old Jordan Davis, his friends and family. There is no equivalency between that actual harm and my theoretical harm. The harm Dunn has done to me and other gun owners is to make us look like trigger-happy hot heads, when the opposite is true. How can I say that? With more than 100 million gun owners in America, we'd have thousands of shootings every day if we lacked impulse control, like Dunn.
BUSINESS
February 20, 2014 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
As millions of policyholders learned late last year that their health insurance was being canceled, recriminations began to fly. Who was to blame? Was it incompetent, devious Democrats intent on soaking the rich, or menacing Republican saboteurs taking time out from their relentless war on women to take away health care from the poor? Then a new and seemingly soothing narrative emerged. It was sagely suggested that policymakers always understood there would be winners and losers, and anyway, this was all in the service of making health care better in America.
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