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NEWS
July 10, 2016 | By Sam Wood, Staff Writer
Pennsylvania's medical marijuana bill was signed into law in April, but it will be two years before most patients can take advantage of it. That's how long the state has to come up with specific regulations to build this industry. Judging from the range of topics and speakers Friday at a daylong "Medical Marijuana Regulatory-Palooza," it may take at least that long to figure it all out. "We are about to do something that has never been done before," said State Sen. Daylin Leach (D., Montgomery)
NEWS
July 6, 2016 | By Susan Snyder, Staff Writer
Temple University early Tuesday morning elevated law school dean JoAnne A. Epps to provost, its number-two position, replacing Hai-Lung Dai, who was removed from the post last week. The appointment, subject to approval by the board of trustees, would be permanent - not interim, as universities often do so they can launch a national search. Epps, 65, who has spent 31 years at the law school, the last eight as its dean, was appointed by president Neil D. Theobald. Her title will include senior vice president and chief academic officer also, and she will oversee academics across the university's 17 schools and colleges and 12 administrative offices.
NEWS
July 5, 2016
IN CONGRESS, July 4, 1776. The unanimous Declaration of the thirteen united States of America, When in the Course of human events, it becomes necessary for one people to dissolve the political bands which have connected them with another, and to assume among the powers of the earth, the separate and equal station to which the Laws of Nature and of Nature's God entitle them, a decent respect to the opinions of mankind requires that they should declare...
NEWS
July 3, 2016 | By Marie McCullough, Staff Writer
Pennsylvania this week became the 41st state to pass controversial legislation aimed at making oral cancer drugs more affordable for patients. The bill, which passed both chambers of the legislature unanimously Thursday, was headed to Gov. Wolf, whose office said Friday that he would sign it into law. Out-of-pocket costs for intravenous chemotherapy - which requires going to a medical office for infusions - are much lower than patients' costs...
NEWS
July 2, 2016 | By Maria Panaritis and Angela Couloumbis, STAFF WRITERS
HARRISBURG - In a victory for the Catholic Church and a rebuke to the state House, the Senate voted Thursday to change the state's child sex-abuse laws, but only after removing a contentious provision that would have let victims from as far back as the 1970s sue their attackers and private institutions. With a 49-0 vote, the Republican-led chamber agreed to eliminate the statute of limitations for criminal charges against child-sex abusers. But the bill had been gutted of language to retroactively extend to age 50 the deadline by which victims could file lawsuits.
BUSINESS
July 2, 2016 | By Chris Mondics, Staff Writer
Cross-border deals, a big source of revenue for law firms in Philadelphia and beyond, likely will take a hit from the British vote to exit the European Union, lawyers who specialize in international transactions say. Mergers-and-acquisitions activity had already been softening by June 23, the day of the Brexit referendum, as high asset valuations had begun to discourage investors. But the British vote to leave the EU created a whole new set of problems. For many American companies, the United Kingdom long has been a launching pad for selling into the European continent.
NEWS
July 1, 2016
CITY COUNCIL approved well over 100 measures on June 16. This is quite common on the last day of a legislative session. Everything from approving all-way stop signs to more detailed policy initiatives dealing with nuisance businesses and delinquent taxpayers were given the green light by my colleagues and me. Lost in the lengthy debate on the soda tax - not insignificant and hopefully not overshadowed - was a piece of legislation that will...
NEWS
June 30, 2016
ISSUE | PUBLIC SAFETY Take care of paramedics, EMTs The Pennsylvania legislature should amend the Heart and Lung Act to include paramedics and EMTs ("Bill adds to safety workers' benefits," Monday). The act, written in 1935, was intended to provide public safety personnel with full compensation while temporarily disabled from injuries sustained in the line of duty, but it excluded paramedics and EMTs because those job classifications did not exist at the time. In Philadelphia, paramedics and EMTs are considered essential personnel who, like firefighters and police officers, respond to fires, building collapses, explosions, active-shooter scenes, Hazmat situations, and other incidents with mass casualties, such as last year's Amtrak derailment.
NEWS
June 30, 2016
By Bill Pounds and Hugh Giordano In April, union-heavy West Virginia became the 26th right-to-work state in the country, leading some to wonder if Pennsylvania would soon follow. The Pennsylvania House of Representatives wasted no time introducing a package of six bills designed to make this thought a reality. Passing these bills would be a mistake for working people and business owners alike. At their most basic level, unions exist as a way to protect employees, considering that corporate interests begin with all the bargaining power.
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