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NEWS
May 14, 2014 | By Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writer
State Sen. Daylin Leach says Marjorie Margolies is continuing to violate federal campaign finance laws, and has lodged a new complaint as the Democrats vying for the 13th Congressional District seat enter the last full week before the May 20 primary. Leach said Monday he intends to file a supplementary letter with the Federal Election Commission alleging that Margolies has again spent contributions designated for the general election on her primary campaign. Four Democrats are battling for the nomination in the 13th, which includes parts of Philadelphia and Montgomery County.
NEWS
May 13, 2014 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jessica Saulnier's life story has been entwined with the military, and she plans to keep it that way. The theme began at birth, in 1984, on Keesler Air Force Base in Mississippi - or even before, with her grandfather, who was captured and imprisoned in Poland during World War II. When she graduates this month from Rutgers-Camden, Saulnier will head to law school to pursue her dream of becoming a military lawyer with the Judge Advocate General Corps....
NEWS
May 10, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Joseph W. Marshall Jr., 88, of Philadelphia, a professor emeritus at Temple University Law School, died Sunday, May 4, of congestive heart failure at Bryn Mawr Hospital. The law school hailed him on its website as "a legendary tax professor who served the law school from 1960 to his retirement in 1996. " His was a quick rise. He began as a lecturer in 1960, then served as an associate professor for two years before being named a full professor in 1968. In addition to teaching taxation, Mr. Marshall developed the Graduate Tax Program and directed it from 1970 to 1984.
NEWS
May 7, 2014 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
So this is what history looks like in real time. For nearly 231 years, lawyers for Rawle & Henderson L.L.P. have been plying courthouses in Philadelphia for clients with urgent legal needs, and that would make it the oldest law firm in the United States. Fittingly, its offices at 13th and Chestnut Streets are redolent of its deep ties to the past. An oil portrait of name partner Joseph Henderson, a onetime president of the American Bar Association, hangs prominently. On display nearby is a letter from Secretary of the Treasury Alexander Hamilton to firm founder William Rawle, delicately inquiring about progress in a case.
BUSINESS
May 6, 2014 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
The U.S. Department of Labor's order last fall - under Section 503 of the Americans With Disabilities Act - that large government contractors show that 7 percent of their workers are "individuals with disabilities," is one reason tech companies are seeking to hire people with autism. Autism, a group of conditions that typically include repetitive behavior, can make working in many environments difficult. But the federal order is not the only reason some companies are looking for people with autism.
NEWS
May 1, 2014 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
For Sara Navarro, being undocumented used to feel a lot like being hunted. That changed in 2012, with the implementation of Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA), which gave temporary protection to certain immigrants who were brought here illegally by their parents before age 16. "It definitely feels different," said Navarro, of North Philadelphia, who was 11 when she emigrated from Honduras. "Now, we don't have to watch our backs. We can live with our parents, and they can't deport us. " But it was a bittersweet victory.
NEWS
April 30, 2014 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG A longtime good-government advocate told a Senate panel Monday that Pennsylvania's ethics and lobbying laws regarding gifts are among the country's weakest and must be "dramatically strengthened. " At a hearing before the Senate State Government Committee, Barry Kauffman, executive director of Common Cause of Pennsylvania, urged lawmakers to approve a ban that would elevate the state from its position behind states with expansive ethics laws. "The incestuous linkage between gifts, campaign contributions, and public policy must end," said Kauffman, whose group has advocated for tougher ethics laws in Pennsylvania for 40 years.
NEWS
April 25, 2014 | BY CHRIS BRENNAN, Daily News Staff Writer brennac@phillynews.com, 215-854-5973
U . S. REP. ALLYSON Schwartz yesterday accused her fellow Democrats in the May 20 primary election for governor of being "vague" in support of the Affordable Care Act, a/k/a Obamacare. Schwartz was mostly talking about front-runner Tom Wolf, a former state revenue secretary, who, like the other Democratic candidates, has publicly supported the law in his campaign. "Particularly, I think Tom Wolf has been evasive about expressing support for the law," said Schwartz, who this week started running a campaign ad on television, touting her role in helping to craft and pass the legislation.
NEWS
April 25, 2014 | By Jessica Parks, Inquirer Staff Writer
Marjorie Margolies' fund-raising totals may have gone from minimal to illegal in the first three months of 2014, according to a complaint filed by one of her opponents in the 13th District congressional race. State Sen. Daylin Leach has told the Federal Election Commission that Margolies repeatedly broke campaign finance laws by spending money designated for the general election on expenses for the primary. Finance reports filed by her campaign show that Margolies ran out of primary funds on Jan. 15. However, she continued to make disbursements for her consultants, staff, travel expenses, and office supplies.
NEWS
April 25, 2014 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
Rutgers University announced a new chancellor Wednesday for its Camden campus: a former professor at Temple University's law school who is now the law school dean at the University of Maryland. Phoebe A. Haddon, 63, will join Rutgers-Camden on July 1, returning to a region where she worked for decades and the state where she grew up. "It seems like a great place for me to come to after five years of being a dean here. It has a real nice-size campus for the kind of work that I'd like to do," Haddon said Wednesday afternoon.
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