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NEWS
April 8, 2015 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Staff Writer
The national controversy that clouded the run-up to a Final Four that concluded Monday night in Indianapolis wasn't the first collision between basketball and civil-rights politics. In Louisiana in 1956, as in Indiana 59 years later, a four-team basketball tournament involving a favored Kentucky team was engulfed in a political storm, though the divisive issue then was race and not sexual preference. And as in Indiana, where a recent religious-freedom law was widely seen as discriminatory against homosexuals, the Louisiana dispute involved changing cultural mores, a conservative legislature, worried civic and business leaders and, ultimately, government intervention that saved the event.
BUSINESS
April 8, 2015 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
Law-firm mergers, bolstered by the recovering legal market, are off to a quick start this year, according to the Newtown Square legal-consulting firm Altman Weil, which logged 29 combinations in the first quarter. It was the second-fastest pace since Altman Weil began tracking law-firm mergers in 2007, and reflects the growing confidence of firms that their businesses have substantially recovered from the sharp downturn in revenue in 2009 and 2010. Included in the tally is Morgan Lewis's announced combination with the Singapore-based firm Stamford Law Corp., a transaction that closed Wednesday.
SPORTS
April 6, 2015 | By Bob Ford, Inquirer Columnist
The Final Four is taking place in Indianapolis as scheduled, and, no doubt, the NCAA is quite proud of the inroads it made in the past week to ensure that same-sex couples will still be able to get their wedding cakes from religious-right bakers. After all, it's every couple's dream. That's not one of the specific rights the founding fathers addressed when fashioning the U.S. Constitution, but it's in there somewhere amid the philosophy of equality, tolerance, and the separation of church and state.
NEWS
April 4, 2015 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
Gov. Christie on Thursday pardoned a Philadelphia woman who had faced up to five years in prison for bringing into the state a gun that was legally registered in Pennsylvania but not in New Jersey. Shaneen Allen admitted during a traffic stop on the Atlantic City Expressway that she had the firearm in her purse. Allen, 27, a phlebotomist, was indicted after her Oct. 1, 2013, arrest on charges of illegally bringing a concealed weapon into the state, and in September agreed to enter a pretrial intervention program.
NEWS
April 3, 2015
A DUCK walks into an Indiana bar and asks for a drink. The bartender refuses to serve him. The duck says, "It's that damn religious law, right? You have something against poultry, right? You're such a bigot, you know?" And the bartender says, "Me, I'm an atheist. It ain't got nothing to do with religion. You just smell foul. " And the duck says, "See, I told ya!" The above will explain several things, not the least of which is why I was never expected to have a brilliant career in standup comedy.
NEWS
April 3, 2015 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
Derek Green says that when he worked for the City of Philadelphia, he had nothing to do with the Green Fund. Sure, the political action committee shares his last name. Sure, he was guest of honor at its fund-raiser last July. And sure, when he quit his $129,000-a-year city job to run for City Council, the Green Fund became his campaign fund. But he says he had nothing to do with the fund until then. Which is good, because he might have run afoul of city ethics rules if he had. Green, who worked for 11 years for Ninth District Councilwoman Marian Tasco, quit Feb. 13 to run for a Council-at-large seat - and only then, he says, did he connect himself to the fund.
NEWS
April 1, 2015 | BY JULIE SHAW, Daily News Staff Writer shawj@phillynews.com, 215-854-2592
DEFENSE ATTORNEYS for the ex-narcotics cops accused of robbing suspected drug dealers went on the attack yesterday, calling the alleged victims "despicable liars. " They also lambasted Jeffrey Walker, a former narcotics cop-turned-cooperating government witness. Defense lawyer Jack McMahon, in his typical bulldog manner, called Walker "dirty and despicable, dumb and arrogant. " McMahon said he will put on the stand the narcotics cops' supervisors - who were at the scenes of the alleged robberies - to show there was no wrongdoing.
NEWS
March 25, 2015 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
Gov. Christie conditionally vetoed legislation Monday that would have repealed the mandatory suspension of driver's licenses for first-time drunk drivers and instead required them to install devices that would be able to detect alcohol and stop cars from starting. Christie returned the bill to the Legislature and proposed imposing both penalties on all drunken-driving offenders. "By combining our existing, rigorous system of mandatory license suspensions with the active monitoring provided by interlock devices, New Jersey will provide new hope in the fight against drunk-driving deaths and injuries," Christie said in his veto message.
BUSINESS
March 21, 2015 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
More than most, Ted Ruger understands legal complexity. And a good thing, too. The former Supreme Court law clerk is set to take over as dean of the University of Pennsylvania law school July 1. Penn, along with a handful of other elite U.S. law schools, brands itself as a training ground for top students who learn to grapple with the most difficult legal problems. That's why so many of the highest-paying law firms want to hire them, even in a job market that still is struggling.
NEWS
March 17, 2015 | By Kelly Flynn, Inquirer Staff Writer
Many of the courses she is taking at Rutgers-Camden law school are about the law as it currently is, says Katie Lara. "Sexuality, Gender, Identity and the Law" is different, she says: It is about how social movements change laws. The course that has Lara and fellow students excited is inspired by what its creator calls "the great civil rights struggle of our era" - for LGBT rights. Rutgers professor Katie Eyer said she began teaching the elective about a year ago after she was approached by students interested in the law as it pertains to sexuality.
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