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NEWS
July 30, 2014
NO ONE should be held in jail for days on end because some federal agent wants to "run checks" on them to see whether it would be lawful to arrest them for something. In fact, the Fourth, Fifth and 14th Amendments to our Constitution prohibit that kind of tyrannical police-state behavior. Yet, Stu Bykofsky, in his column "Welcome, foreign felons," takes Mayor Nutter to task for upholding this basic American principle. The city has a policy, in place since mid-April, of refusing to honor non-binding "detainer" requests lodged by federal immigration authorities on prisoners in city jails whom our criminal justice system has determined should be released.
NEWS
July 22, 2014 | BY KAREN LEVY
  LAST MONTH, after a tractor-trailer collided with a vehicle carrying actor Tracy Morgan and others, national attention focused - briefly - on the serious issue of fatigued truck drivers. The truck's driver, Kevin Roper, was charged with vehicular manslaughter in the death of comedian James McNair, one of the vehicle's passengers, and prosecutors alleged that Roper hadn't slept in more than 24 hours. But then an initial report from the National Transportation Safety Board said that Roper had been working for 13 1/2 hours at the time of the crash, just within the legal limit of 14 hours on duty with no more than 11 hours behind the wheel.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 2014 | By Howard Gensler
EVEN IF you're not a big fan of weddings, the nuptials of Adam Levine and Behati Prinsloo sounds like it was a pretty good time. The destination affair was at Flora Farms, in Cabo San Lucas, Mexico. A number of the bridesmaids were Victoria's Secret models. Stevie Nicks performed at the reception. The ceremony was officiated by Levine's longtime friend, Jonah Hill . "Jonah was hysterical," an unnamed source told E! News. "He was telling so many jokes, but then in the middle would be so sweet and sincere.
BUSINESS
July 21, 2014 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
When FBI agents knocked on the door of his home just before sunrise Nov. 1, 2011, in Chappaqua, N.Y., a wealthy suburb north of Manhattan, David Adler's nightmare was just beginning. As his wife and two children looked on, Adler was marched out of the house, handcuffed and placed in a car, and then driven to the federal courthouse in Camden. There, the bookish securities lawyer with thinning gray hair and rimless spectacles was charged with conspiring with a group led by mobster Nicodemo Scarfo, son of the infamous former mob boss, to take control of a Texas finance company and then loot it of millions.
NEWS
July 12, 2014 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
Vineyards on preserved farmland can sell some merriment along with their wine, under a bipartisan bill signed last week by Gov. Christie that removes a hurdle to holding festivals, wedding receptions, and private parties there. Among the state's 48 licensed wineries, 19 are enrolled in the farmland preservation program, which means they have surrendered their right to sell the land for development. "The state is encouraging farms to go into preservation. We want to keep green vistas," said Assemblyman Ron Dancer, a Republican who represents parts of Burlington, Ocean, Middlesex, and Monmouth Counties, who cosponsored the bill.
NEWS
July 9, 2014 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
From his perch at the crimson-walled tasting bar in Love Vape on South Fifth Street, Jeff Cullaton took a dim view of Philadelphia's new law banning electronic cigarettes from most indoor public spaces. "I think it's premature," he said, enveloped in a custard-flavored vapor cloud. The restriction, in effect since last Tuesday, does not apply to shops like this, where the air is as thick and cloying as a taxi loaded with Car Scent air fresheners. Yet the very idea that e-cigarettes may be unhealthy in any setting has raised the hackles of aficionados like Cullaton.
NEWS
July 8, 2014 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
  By day, Gerard Breland has spent the last 23 years prosecuting criminals. Among the 60 cases he tried was a particularly heinous matter involving murder and jury intimidation in Jersey City. But in his free time, the Burlington Township resident turns his attention to the less seedy side of life. He and his wife, Tonya, have recorded 17 original and traditional gospel songs on YouTube, earning as many as 15,368 views on one of them: "I Want to Say Thank You. " He also directs the music and worship team at Destiny Church in Moorestown.
NEWS
July 5, 2014 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pennsylvania has joined most states in requiring that newborns have their blood oxygen levels measured - a simple test that allows doctors to catch rare heart defects missed during prenatal screening. The test, known as pulse oximetry, consists of placing a small sensor on the infant's foot. It is common practice at birthing hospitals, but was not mandated in Pennsylvania. On Wednesday, Gov. Corbett signed the requirement, which takes effect in 90 days. Physicians say the test can detect problems while newborns are still in the hospital, in case they need surgery.
NEWS
July 1, 2014 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
At once tidy and stalwart, but pockmarked, too, with its share of boarded-up homes, Elizabeth Young's neighborhood in the Cobbs Creek section of West Philadelphia is the epitome of urban grit. No one would mistake this tough patch of the city for a hotbed of real estate action. And yet the District Attorney's Office stands to make a pretty good return here. On April 3, 2013, Common Pleas Court Judge Paula Patrick ruled in favor of the D.A.'s Office and ordered Young, 69, a widow active in her church, to turn over her home to the city.
NEWS
June 28, 2014 | By Rachel Zamzow, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pennsylvania had the most Lyme disease cases in the nation in 2009, 2011, and 2012, yet no state-run surveillance program for ticks exists. A bill Gov. Corbett signed into law Thursday seeks to remedy that. The Lyme and Related Tick-Borne Disease Surveillance, Education, Prevention, and Treatment Act will establish a 20-member task force to develop educational and surveillance programs to be run by the Department of Health and other agencies. "This is an underdiagnosed and undertreated disease," said Sen. Stewart Greenleaf (R., Montgomery)
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