CollectionsLaws
IN THE NEWS

Laws

NEWS
November 30, 2015 | By Michaelle Bond, Inquirer Staff Writer
After three boys harassed and distributed explicit photos of a 13-year-old classmate, her life as a freshman at Conestoga High School became "a living hell," in the words of the Chester County district attorney. But she was able this fall to take advantage of a new state law - one that placed her classmates under a court order barring the boys from any contact with her. Following the lead of other states, Pennsylvania's Protection of Victims of Sexual Violence or Intimidation law for the first time expands traditional court-ordered protection from its typical targets - such as ex-spouses and relatives - to acquaintances and strangers.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 26, 2015 | By Carolyn Hax
Question: I do not smoke, nor does my husband. His family smokes. His grandma holds Christmas Eve at her house, and his whole family gathers there. I am now pregnant with our second child, and our first is 8 months old. Last year for Christmas Eve, his mom said they would just smoke outside because I was pregnant and did not want to be around it. Well, his grandma grabs a cigarette and lights up right next to me and turns the fan on. His mom gave her a dirty look and asked her to go upstairs or outside, and she said, "I'm not leaving my house to smoke.
NEWS
November 11, 2015 | By Angela Couloumbis, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - Pennsylvania Attorney General Kathleen G. Kane will be hard pressed to function as the state's top law enforcement officer with a suspended law license, a trio of district attorneys from across the state testified Monday. The top lawyers from Bucks, Berks, and Somerset Counties told a Senate panel that almost everything they do - from budget decisions to deciding whether to charge someone with a crime - is a legal decision that they could not make without an active law license.
NEWS
November 11, 2015 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
TRENTON - Gov. Christie on Monday vetoed legislation that would have brought sweeping changes to the state's voting laws, panning the bill as "thinly veiled political gamesmanship. " Christie, a Republican running for president, previously criticized the legislation as an effort by the Democratic National Committee to increase voter fraud. "Ultimately, New Jersey taxpayers deserve better than to have their hard-earned tax dollars spent on thinly veiled political gamesmanship, and the state must ensure that every eligible citizen's vote counts and is not stolen by fraud," Christie wrote in his veto message.
NEWS
November 9, 2015 | BY DAVID GAMBACORTA, Daily News Staff Writer gambacd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5994
DEPENDING on your perspective, a department-wide message that Police Commissioner Charles Ramsey sent earlier this week was either old news or a new obstacle for cops who have to stop possible criminal suspects. Ramsey, who will retire in January, holds the former view. The Fraternal Order of Police Lodge No. 5 begs to differ. "All officers should know, anonymous flash information does not provide the reasonable suspicion necessary to make a lawful stop," began the message, which was issued Thursday with instructions for it to be read during roll-calls for three days.
BUSINESS
November 9, 2015 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
WASHINGTON - Catherine Botticelli has seen some big changes in Washington since she started working there as a lawyer in the 1990s. The reach of Washington regulators has extended and so has their scrutiny of U.S. businesses. More and more, oversight agencies and law enforcement go after not only companies but also the people who run them. "After the [2008] credit crisis, there was this sense that people commit wrongful acts, not just companies," said Botticelli, a senior partner at Dechert L.L.P., a global law firm based in University City.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 2015 | Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
The workmanlike German-language drama Labyrinth of Lies delves into the so-called Frankfurt-Auschwitz trials of the early 1960s. Nazis had been tried for war crimes at Nuremberg, in Poland, and in Israel, but the Frankfurt-Auschwitz trials had a particular resonance and meaning: Germans prosecuted by Germans, under German criminal law. The technicalities involved were legally and morally mind-boggling. The government could only charge offenders, former SS men, for specific acts committed outside the parameters of a soldier's hideous "duties.
NEWS
November 5, 2015 | By Jacob Adelman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Law firm O'Brien Rulis Bochicchio has expanded its offices to about 5,200 square feet at 1515 Market St., according to PernaFrederick Commercial Real Estate, which helped broker the lease. The firm has until now occupied 3,700 square feet in the 20-story building, PernaFrederick broker Joe Viturello said Tuesday. The brokerage also represented the Philadelphia Center on Alcoholism in a 2,250-square-foot lease at 1211 Chestnut St. and assisted the Peggy Browning Fund with a 2,000-square-foot lease in the Land Title Building at 100 S. Broad St, it said in a release.
NEWS
November 4, 2015 | By Maddie Hanna and Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
Gov. Christie returned to Camden on Monday to praise the Camden County police force, pledging to stand with law enforcement while pushing his campaign-trail accusations that President Obama - who also was in New Jersey to address criminal justice reform - has failed to support police. The Republican governor, who has tried to cast himself as the law-and-order candidate in the 2016 presidential race, said he would sign an executive order declaring Nov. 5 a law enforcement appreciation day in New Jersey.
NEWS
November 1, 2015 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Inquirer Staff Writer
Two weeks before the Nov. 3 election, City Councilman David Oh's law license was suspended because he failed to pay the $200 renewal fee to the state Disciplinary Board. Oh, a Republican seeking his second term, on Friday said he couldn't recall whether he had seen any late notices but that the renewal wasn't a priority because he isn't actively practicing law. "The law license and keeping it up is not something of great value to me," Oh said. "So if [the renewal] was across my desk, I probably would have done it. If I was aware of it, I put it some place else.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|