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NEWS
June 29, 2016 | By Lisa Haver
AMERICA WAS founded on a system of open government in which all citizens, rich or poor, should have equal access to those who make the laws and should be able to express opinions on those laws before they are enacted. Our nation's founders recognized that power must be divided among branches of government and that there must be checks on power. And when government officials betray the public trust, we can vote them out of office. But there are no checks on those appointed to govern the School District of Philadelphia and no way to vote them out. The School Reform Commission, which has invoked "special powers" when it sees the law as an impediment to its agenda, is not compelled to follow the basic tenets of democracy.
NEWS
June 29, 2016 | By Marie McCullough, Staff Writer
In a big win for abortion-rights advocates, the U.S. Supreme Court on Monday struck down a Texas abortion law that required clinics to meet hospital-like surgical standards and doctors to get admitting privileges at a local hospital. The 5-3 ruling was the most significant since Planned Parenthood v. Casey in 1992, which set the precedent that states could impose abortion restrictions as long as they did not create an "undue burden" on women seeking abortions. An undue burden existed if a restriction's "purpose or effect is to place substantial obstacles" in the path of women who want an abortion, including "unnecessary health regulations.
BUSINESS
June 28, 2016
Capehart Scatchard, Mount Laurel, has hired attorneys Sheila M. Mints and Denise L. Sanders as shareholders in its health-care law department. Both came from Parker McCay, where Mints was a shareholder and chair of the health-care law group and Sanders was of counsel. Museum of the American Revolution, Philadelphia, has hired Sue Nicol as director of human resources. She had been director of human resources and administrative services at Indian Creek Foundation.
NEWS
June 26, 2016 | By Chris Mondics, Staff Writer
For now, the status quo will remain. The decision by United Kingdom voters to exit the European Union means the British government must now negotiate the terms of its withdrawal, which could take up to two years. The stakes are enormous for Europe and much of the world. London could lose its primacy as an investment center. Yet the effect on the U.S. economy will likely be small. Certainly, the news rattled the stock market, which saw a 610-point drop in the Dow Jones industrial average Friday.
NEWS
June 24, 2016 | By Carolyn Hax, Advice Columnist
Adapted from a recent online discussion. Question: Is there a polite way to remind easily offended in-laws that I have family, too? I just spent a day with my in-laws, who demanded promises for future major holidays (this year and later years) and will only accept a yes from my husband; no other answers from me are accepted. I'm pretty heartbroken that my in-laws never seemed to even consider that I might want to spend a holiday with my only sibling and her infant.
NEWS
June 24, 2016 | By Christine Flowers
HERE ARE SOME of the things you are not supposed to compare abortion to: Slavery. That's because slaves were human, and, even though the law treated them as property, the truth of their separate and sacred identity was obvious to the naked and uncompromised eye. The Holocaust. That's because Hitler's victims were human, with infinite gifts that elevated civilization, even though the laws - both expressed and implicit - treated them as lesser beings. Their humanity was evident.
NEWS
June 24, 2016 | By Janaki Chadha, Staff Writer
In what is likely to be a rigorous cross-disciplinary experience, the University of Pennsylvania will launch a program next year that would offer candidates a chance to earn degrees in law and medicine. It will take students six years to complete, while a medical degree takes four years and a law degree three. The program will be directed primarily at students pursuing medical careers, with the aim of helping future doctors gain skills that could prove valuable in parts of the field where the importance of legal knowledge is growing.
NEWS
June 22, 2016 | By Jonathan Tamari, WASHINGTON BUREAU
WASHINGTON - A partisan divide on Monday blocked the four latest Senate proposals meant to curb gun violence, providing no change in the nation's gun laws but adding to this election year's political fodder. With the Orlando massacre still fresh, the stakes were particularly high in Pennsylvania's U.S. Senate race, where Sen. Pat Toomey (R., Pa.) has trumpeted his support for expanding background checks on gun buyers and Democratic challenger Katie McGinty has attacked him as failing to take real action.
NEWS
June 22, 2016 | By Karen Langley, HARRISBURG BUREAU
HARRISBURG - The Pennsylvania Supreme Court on Monday declined to reinstate a law that gave groups like the National Rifle Association the right to challenge local gun-control rules in court. Commonwealth Court overturned the law last year on the ground that the legislative process used to make it had violated the state constitution. The gun provision had been added to a bill that addressed the theft of metals. The Supreme Court agreed "that the legislature violated the single-subject rule in an effort to pass an unpopular and irrational bill without being noticed," said Sen. Daylin Leach (D., Montgomery)
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