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NEWS
February 1, 2014 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
GLOUCESTER TWP. Invoking a new state law, Camden County officials have charged a man and a woman with human trafficking after they allegedly brought a woman from North Carolina to New Jersey to work as a prostitute. Van Howell, 41, of Sicklerville, and Krista Burton, 30, of Columbia, Pa., were arrested last Friday and charged with first-degree human trafficking, Camden County Prosecutor Warren Faulk said at a news conference Thursday at the Municipal Building in Gloucester Township. The two recruited a 26-year-old sex worker from Cherokee, N.C., Faulk said in a statement, paying for her bus ticket and promising her "more lucrative business," but then warning her of consequences if she did not meet their expectations.
NEWS
January 31, 2014
BEN Bernanke exits his two terms as Fed chief this week generally regarded as the wonky econ nerd and student of the Great Depression who used his megamind to save our collapsed economy. He's credited with taking drastic action to restore some semblance of confidence in the financial system, and this he did. He bought up $4 trillion in mortgage bonds and securities from the big banks, shored up their balance sheets, paid off their worthless IOUs (the AIG bailout) and in the process kept rates low to help goose our anemic recovery.
SPORTS
January 31, 2014 | BY AARON CARTER, Daily News Staff Writer cartera@phillynews.com, 215-854-5814
MAYBE JA'QUAN NEWTON hasn't seen everything in his 4 years at Ss. Neumann-Goretti High, but he certainly has witnessed a lot. The atmosphere at Archbishop Carroll yesterday was frenzied, replete with a packed student section decked mostly in white, save for a few holdouts. The Patriots faithful stood, cheered and chanted all night - even the JV game had a raucous, playoff feel. In fact, so many patrons had packed the regular-season Catholic League matchup that one of Neumann-Goretti's assistant coaches initially was denied admission.
NEWS
January 29, 2014
The Corbett administration's appointment of Kristen Donmoyer to direct the state's Dog Law Enforcement Office is the clearest demonstration yet that it has finally gotten serious about protecting the tens of thousands of dogs in more than 2,000 Pennsylvania kennels. The choice of Donmoyer, who is respected as tough and knowledgeable, marks a welcome departure from the administration's earlier neglect of the office. After Corbett's inauguration in 2011, the administration replaced its competent director with a political appointee who had no apparent background in the field.
BUSINESS
January 26, 2014 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
Center City law firm Saul Ewing L.L.P. said Friday that it had named Barry F. Levin, a partner in its Baltimore office, managing partner of the firm. Levin has chaired the firm's business and finance department for three years. He replaces David Antzis, who is returning to the full-time practice of law, as the firm's chief executive. Revenues from Saul Ewing's business and finance practice grew 17 percent during the time Levin chaired the group, the firm said in a statement. "Barry is a strong and proven leader with a vision to grow Saul Ewing to meet the needs of our clients at the pace they are evolving," Antzis said.
SPORTS
January 23, 2014
LAST JANUARY, the Phillies added an outfielder, Delmon Young, once arrested for a hate crime. This January, the team has added a pitcher once charged with lewdness after allegedly groping a woman in a hospital. Chad Gaudin, the 30-year-old pitcher the Phillies signed to a minor league contract yesterday, was charged with a misdemeanor last summer stemming from an incident that occurred last January. According to the San Francisco Chronicle: "Police say Gaudin, who was drunk, approached a 23-year-old woman lying on a gurney in the emergency room lobby.
BUSINESS
January 23, 2014 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
Villanova University Law School said Tuesday that it would double the number of full scholarships available to members of the incoming 2014 class, to as many as 50. The scholarships would cover the full three years of law school, said dean John Y. Gotanda. Law schools nationwide have been under pressure to recruit new students as applications have fallen in the face of declining job opportunities for newly minted lawyers, and many have cut their enrollments in recognition of that trend.
NEWS
January 23, 2014 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Could headline-grabbing scenarios like those in Texas and California involving brain-dead patients happen here? Yes, experts say. First, Texas: Marlise Munoz, 33, was found by her husband, Erick, at 2 a.m. Nov. 26 on their 2-year-old son's bedroom floor. Her heart had stopped for perhaps an hour after a pulmonary embolism. Her husband began CPR, called 911. She was 14 weeks pregnant. Her family stated from the beginning - only confirmed by the hospital last week - that Munoz was brain-dead.
NEWS
January 20, 2014 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
BRIGANTINE, N.J. - Jamie Kerstetter is in her pink slippers with the pom-poms. And why shouldn't she be? It's a Sunday morning, and she's settling in to a long day during which she won't leave the apartment. The cards are dealt, on the screen, four tables going at once, a far cry from the 20 poker games this former tax lawyer used to fire up on her computer screen in Mexico, where she would spend hour after twitchy hour playing online Texas hold 'em. "My boyfriend and I would sit all day and not talk to each other except when one of us would say, 'Wanna order out?
NEWS
January 19, 2014 | BY CHRIS BRENNAN, Daily News Staff Writer brennac@phillynews.com, 215-854-5973
A COMMONWEALTH Court judge yesterday struck down Pennsylvania's voter-ID law, noting that attorneys for the state had shown nothing but "a vague concern about voter fraud" to justify legislation that could have cost hundreds of thousands of voters the right to cast ballots. Judge Bernard McGinley declared the law unconstitutional in a ruling that said about 430,000 registered voters still don't have the type of identification that would have been needed to vote. Attorneys for Gov. Corbett's administration offered no examples of in-person voter impersonation - the alleged problem that the law was meant to address.
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