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NEWS
June 17, 2016
By Ted Martin The facts are still rolling in about the horrific mass shooting in Orlando, and, as they do, each one is more troubling than the last. I can't imagine how the families and friends of the victims must feel. Even without knowing a victim personally, I am numb and deeply saddened. I'm remembering many nights out with some friends to blow off some steam and enjoy a weekend - and imagining how terrifying it would have been to end up in a massacre of this magnitude. However, I would be lying if I failed to note that I didn't always feel safe being myself in a public place.
NEWS
June 17, 2016
ISSUE | DEVELOPMENT High-rise within law The Philadelphia Department of Licenses and Inspections is not considering allowing a developer, PMC Property Group, to back out of a "deal" to provide affordable housing in return for a zoning "favor" from the city that added five stories to the apartment building on the Delaware waterfront ("Low road for high-rise," Monday). L&I's role is to apply the law. There is no deal; there is no favor. PMC's zoning permit provides for a "zoning bonus" authorizing extra stories on its building.
NEWS
June 17, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
Lewis Becker, 78, of Villanova, a law professor at Villanova University for more than four decades, died Sunday, June 12, of complications from glioblastoma brain cancer at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. He had been diagnosed in March, his family said. Professor Becker joined what is now Villanova's Charles Widger School of Law in 1972, rose to professor in 1976, and retired in 2011 as an emeritus professor, although he kept teaching for several more years. "Professor Becker left an indelible mark on the Law School community and the generations of students he educated and inspired," the school said in a tribute on its Facebook page.
NEWS
June 17, 2016
By David Whiting While families prepare for 49 funerals in the wake of the Orlando nightclub shootings, our leaders and nation play blame games. But the tragedy in Florida isn't only about hot-button issues. It's also about mental health. The Orlando gunman's first wife says he was abusive and mentally unstable. His second wife confesses she tried to talk him out of the attack. Yet neither woman went to authorities. Had they done so in a state such as California, they could have employed a little-known new law to have authorities temporarily take away the shooter's guns.
NEWS
June 16, 2016 | By Michael Matza, Staff Writer
Offering a forum on the fate of students, inmates, and undocumented immigrants, Philadelphia City Council heard testimony Tuesday about what witnesses called "the school-to-prison-to-deportation pipeline. " Using the 20th anniversary of the Illegal Immigration Reform and Immigrant Responsibility Act as a peg, witnesses said the landmark 1996 federal law should be repealed because it removed judicial discretion and due process from the deportation process. While Council has no jurisdiction over federal law, it can advance a resolution asking Congress to act. Councilwoman Helen Gym, who presided at the hearing along with Councilwoman Jannie L. Blackwell, said they would do that.
NEWS
June 15, 2016 | By Jonathan Tamari, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - A day after the deadliest shooting in U.S. history, Democrats challenged Sen. Pat Toomey (R., Pa.) to take a stronger stand on gun laws, aiming to undercut one of his prime arguments for reelection. His Democratic challenger, Katie McGinty, hammered Toomey for voting last year to block a bill that would have barred suspected terrorists from buying guns. And Senate Democrats vowed to bring the politically charged measure back for another vote. "Pat Toomey has worked to allow suspected terrorists to buy guns in this country, and that is just an outrageous position," said McGinty, who is challenging Toomey in one of the country's most critical Senate races.
NEWS
June 14, 2016 | By Karen Langley, HARRISBURG BUREAU
HARRISBURG - Wine on supermarket shelves. Beer sold in 12-packs. Sunday liquor purchases. Is this really Pennsylvania? Last week's enactment of a law that will let hundreds of stores add by-the-bottle wine sales was the latest in a slow drip of efforts by lawmakers and regulators to loosen the state's long-derided grip on its system of alcohol control, and nudge the Keystone State into the 21st century. What remains to be seen is whether the changes will be enough, for now, to quell the advocates who have called for turning over the system to private enterprise, or whether it will, instead, just speed the momentum in that direction.
NEWS
June 14, 2016 | By Jonathan Tamari, Staff Writer
WASHINGTON - The Orlando shooting that left 50 dead Sunday immediately brought new calls for tougher gun laws from Sen. Bob Casey (D., Pa.), who plans to introduce a bill Monday to ban anyone convicted of misdemeanor hate crimes from purchasing firearms. Currently, only those convicted of a felony face such bans. Casey is scheduled to introduce his measure at a Pittsburgh news conference. He was among several officials from the Philadelphia area who said the latest mass shooting shows the need for tighter regulation of gun purchases.
BUSINESS
June 14, 2016 | By Harold Brubaker, Staff Writer
The prospect of being able to buy wine in supermarkets captured much of the public attention last week when Gov. Wolf signed Pennsylvania's most significant liquor reform bill since Prohibition. But for the state's most devoted wine lovers, a much bigger deal is the adoption of direct-to-consumer shipping from winemakers nationwide - putting Pennsylvania in line with 43 other states that give residents access to wine clubs from obscure West Coast wineries. Jeremy Benson, executive director of Free the Grapes!
NEWS
June 13, 2016 | By Mike Newall, Columnist
All things considered, it was just another Tuesday night in the City of Brotherly Love. It was Dec. 6, 1933: Repeal Day, the end of Prohibition, and Philadelphians weren't taking to the streets to celebrate. They were just casually doing what they had been doing for the last 14 years: getting their drink on. "Of course, no one who really wanted a drink at any time during the past 14 years was compelled to deny his thirst," the Inquirer reported on that day. The collective shrug at the historic repeal is surprising to me, considering that Philadelphians don't need much motivation to party.
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