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NEWS
March 17, 2015 | By Kelly Flynn, Inquirer Staff Writer
Many of the courses she is taking at Rutgers-Camden law school are about the law as it currently is, says Katie Lara. "Sexuality, Gender, Identity and the Law" is different, she says: It is about how social movements change laws. The course that has Lara and fellow students excited is inspired by what its creator calls "the great civil rights struggle of our era" - for LGBT rights. Rutgers professor Katie Eyer said she began teaching the elective about a year ago after she was approached by students interested in the law as it pertains to sexuality.
NEWS
March 17, 2015 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
Center City-based Morgan Lewis, the largest law firm in the U.S. in terms of lawyers based domestically, is growing again, this time overseas. The firm said Sunday it was combining with the Stamford Law Corp., an 80-lawyer firm based in Singapore, a booming commercial hub and island nation with a large footprint in shipping, manufacturing, and financial services. The announcement follows by four months Morgan Lewis' acquisition of much of the Bingham McCutchen law firm of Boston, a transaction that vaulted Morgan into the top ranks of firms globally.
BUSINESS
March 7, 2015 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
A $10 million gift from the W.P. Carey Foundation to endow a joint law and M.B.A. degree program was announced Thursday by the University of Pennsylvania. Students in the program graduate with law and master of business administration degrees, attending both the university's law school and Wharton, its business school. The foundation was established by William Polk Carey, a Penn graduate and founder of W.P. Carey Inc., a real estate investment trust with global operations valued at more than $11 billion.
FOOD
March 6, 2015 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
In 2011, when brothers Hank and Steve Frecon wanted to grow profit at their family's 71-year-old Frecon Farms in Boyertown, they began turning some of their apples into hard cider. They were venturing into the fastest-growing alcoholic beverage category in the country - and a thicket of red tape beyond anything they could have imagined. First, they obtained a limited winery license and began fermenting crab apples, Granny Smith, Winesap, and other varieties, producing ciders that, due to apples' natural sugar content, came in around 7.5 percent alcohol by volume (ABV)
BUSINESS
March 5, 2015 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
Justin Dillon, former federal prosecutor and now a white collar defense lawyer, knows all too well the ways campus sexual abuse investigations can go wrong. His litany of bizarrely skewed hearings is fraught with the potential for harm and tragic outcomes. The college student brought up on charges of giving his girlfriend an unwanted kiss, more than a year after the relationship ended; an alleged rape victim who said friends had information the accused had raped others, but then declined to identify the friends; the hearing panel, composed of a librarian, a student dance major, and a professor of romance languages, whose job was to decide whether a sexual assault had occurred.
BUSINESS
March 4, 2015 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Gov. Wolf's broad proposal to reshape Pennsylvania's corporate-tax structure comes as a 2013 law takes effect that was adopted specifically to close a tax loophole Wolf has opposed. In his first budget address Tuesday, Wolf will include corporate-tax rate cuts through 2018 and aim to eliminate certain corporate-tax deductions. "The governor's proposal will promote economic growth, create strong middle-class jobs, and make companies want to invest and grow in Pennsylvania," spokesman Jeff Sheridan said.
NEWS
February 25, 2015 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
TRENTON - New Jersey lawmakers sent a bill to Gov. Christie on Monday that would expand restrictions on investments of state pension funds with outside money managers who donate to national political committees. The legislation also would require the state Treasury Department to regularly publish reports disclosing fees paid to private managers who invest state pension funds. Pay-to-play rules already prohibit the Division of Investment from awarding contracts to firms or investment managers who have donated to New Jersey political parties or campaigns in the preceding two years.
NEWS
February 20, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
During his recent trip to London, Gov. Christie provoked what the British call a row by winking at antivaccine know-nothingism even as measles cases surged back in the former colonies. Despite the governor's worst efforts, though, New Jersey has solid vaccination rules and impressive rates of child immunization. For evidence of the depredations of the nonsense the governor so ably articulated in Old Blighty, one has to look to the other side of the Delaware. In Pennsylvania, the measles vaccination rate among kindergartners last school year was worse than that of every other state save Colorado, according to a review by the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
BUSINESS
February 19, 2015 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
Theodore Ruger, a professor at the University of Pennsylvania Law School since 2004, has been appointed dean of the law school, effective July 1. Ruger, 46, who teaches constitutional law and health-related law and regulation, succeeds Michael A. Fitts, who left in July to become president of Tulane University. Wendell Pritchett has been interim dean and will continue as a professor on the faculties of the law school and the Graduate School of Education. Pritchett, 50, taught at Penn Law from 2001 to 2009, when he left to become chancellor of Rutgers-Camden.
NEWS
February 19, 2015 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
Nearly one-third of the faculty at the University of Pennsylvania Law School have criticized a new university procedure for handling sexual-assault cases that they say undermines traditional safeguards for the accused and could lead to wrongful disciplinary actions against Penn students. The procedure, adopted under pressure from the Obama administration, establishes a new position at Penn - the sexual violence investigative officer - and became effective Feb. 1. The policy weakens standards for finding that a sexual assault has occurred, while offering the accused only limited rights to a defense, law school critics say. Given examples of high-profile sexual-assault charges that have unraveled under close scrutiny, notably the gang-rape allegation at the University of Virginia reported by Rolling Stone magazine, the university must take steps to ensure its procedure for adjudicating sexual-assault cases is fair, the faculty members say. "Due process of law is not window dressing; it is the distillation of centuries of experience, and we ignore the lessons of history at our own peril," the faculty members said in an open letter aimed at the Penn administration as well as the broader public.
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