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Lawsuit

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NEWS
August 22, 2012 | By Wayne Parry, Associated Press
ATLANTIC CITY - At first, it seemed like a coincidence, the kind of thing that happens from time to time at a casino, where the same number or same sequence of cards occurs twice in a row. But when the players at an April game of mini-baccarat at the Golden Nugget Atlantic City kept seeing the same sequence of cards dealt, over and over and over again, their eyes grew wide and their bets grew bigger, zooming from $10 a hand to $5,000. Forty-one consecutive winning hands later, the 14 players had racked up more than $1.5 million in winnings - surrounded by casino security convinced they had cheated but unable to prove how. In a lawsuit against a Kansas City playing card manufacturer, the Golden Nugget contends the cards were unshuffled, despite being promised to be preshuffled and ready to use. The April 30 incident was the latest instance of unshuffled decks of cards causing headaches for an Atlantic City casino.
NEWS
December 14, 1989 | By Denise-Marie Santiago, Inquirer Staff Writer
A prison inmate who wrote a 583-page cookbook while serving a life sentence for murder is suing a Montgomery County man who he says promised to help publish it. Bernard Jerry-El, 43, now at the State Correctional Institution at Pittsburgh, filed the lawsuit against Edward J. Reilly of Devon, who he says took the original copy of his cookbook in 1987 to photocopy and send to publishers. But Reilly lied about his connections with publishers and never returned the cookbook, according to Jerry-El's lawsuit, filed Tuesday in Montgomery County Court.
NEWS
October 22, 1992 | By Mac Daniel, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A Royersford woman has filed suit against her former employer, seeking in excess of $20,000 in damages for what she alleges were various forms of sexual harassment over a half-year period. Hope Lindauer and her husband, C. Michael Lindauer, filed suit Oct. 14 against Berwyn-based Dickson Gabbay Young Inc. and partner James Young, and James A. Donegan and his Wayne security firm, Donegan Security Associates. Lindauer worked at Dickson Gabbay Young Inc. as an administrative assistant.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 9, 2011 | By Mark Kennedy, Associated Press
Director Julie Taymor filed a lawsuit Tuesday against the producers of Spider-Man: Turn Off the Dark , alleging they violated her creative rights and have not compensated her for the work she put into Broadway's most expensive musical. The show's spokesman said he was not aware of the lawsuit, filed in federal court in New York. Taymor was not available to comment. Taymor, who had been the Spider-Man director and cowriter of the book, was fired in March from the $75 million production featuring music by U2's Bono and the Edge, after years of delays, accidents, and critical backlash.
NEWS
July 21, 1988 | By Yvette Ousley, Special to The Inquirer
Great Valley school board members have voted to support the Chester County Intermediate Unit in its lawsuit filed against the Pennsylvania Department of Education. "I strongly recommend that the board approve support of the intermediate unit's lawsuit," Superintendent William Fitzpatrick told board members at Tuesday evening's board meeting. "The IU operates classes for our students. This will have a direct impact on our district in the future if funding matters continue as they have since 1972.
NEWS
August 14, 1998 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A class-action lawsuit challenging Avalon's "magic bus" campaign against underage drinkers and rowdy parties was expanded this week to include this summer's policy of charging youths under a state law prohibiting underage drinking in a public place. The lawsuit, filed in U.S. District Court in Camden, alleges that Avalon's "zero tolerance" policy has routinely violated the constitutional rights of hundreds of youths spending the summer in Avalon. Lawyers had originally sought a court order barring the town from charging underage drinkers under a borough ordinance barring underage possession of alcohol and prohibiting anyone under 21 from being in the presence of alcohol.
NEWS
April 27, 1991 | By Ross Kerber, Special to The Inquirer
Gloucester County Superior Court Judge John Holston yesterday threw out a lawsuit by three Washington Township residents who had been trying to stop construction of an office complex along Fries Mill Road. Holston ruled that the residents did not show that township officials had acted arbitrarily when they rezoned the property to allow the office complex, being built by developer Frank Lauletta. Three neighbors of the project, Melanie Parvin, Jo Ann Baglini and Eric Pfister, sued the township in July 1989.
SPORTS
June 9, 2003 | Daily News Wire Services
Atlantic Coast Conference commissioner John Swofford thinks a lawsuit aimed at disrupting the conference's expansion won't succeed because the league and schools followed proper guidelines. "NCAA institutions are free to associate with other institutions that they deem most in harmony with their academic and athletic mission," Swofford said yesterday. "The ACC has acted properly and legally throughout this process and is unaware of any conduct by Miami, Boston College or Syracuse that would violate the terms of their by-laws or that could bind them to the Big East against their will.
SPORTS
April 20, 1999 | Daily News Wire Services
The women's basketball coach at Hampton University, her husband and an assistant coach filed a $30 million lawsuit yesterday over their detainment by Lubbock, Texas, police who were investigating an alleged scam. The lawsuit contends police engaged in racially discriminatory behavior when they detained coach Patricia Bibbs, her husband Ezell and assistant coach Vanetta Kelso on Nov. 16. All three, who are black, have said they believe race played a role in how they were treated.
NEWS
October 2, 1993 | By Reid Kanaley, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A federal judge has dismissed a $1 million civil rights lawsuit filed by a Drexel Hill couple who blamed Delaware County officials for the crib death of the baby they were trying to adopt. "I cannot permit such a case to go to a jury," U.S. District Judge Lowell A. Reed Jr. wrote in an opinion filed this week in Philadelphia. "Plaintiffs must present more than mere allegations, bare assertions or simple suspicions. " The case was filed in December by Ed and Joan Young. The Youngs had been in the process of adopting their 10-month-old foster son, whom they called Jed, when the child died on April 2, 1991.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 26, 2015 | BY REGINA MEDINA, Daily News Staff Writer, medinar@phillynews.com, 215-854-5985
WHEN BARBARA Galarza was told by a high school psychologist last year that her teen daughter had "intellectual disabilities," she began to "cry, cry, cry. " She still had another surprise coming. The non-bilingual psychologist told her, "Don't worry, it's better this way. She'll get a lot of benefits," Galarza recalled yesterday in an interview conducted in Spanish. "She was heartless. " "Nobody would want news like that. It's not logical," she said. "For me that's not normal, [to]
NEWS
August 22, 2015 | By Michaelle Bond, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Chester County Court judge has dismissed a lawsuit the Coatesville Area School District brought against its former solicitor and his former law firm that accused them of overbilling and unsound legal advice. The school district has 20 days from the date of the judge's decision, Monday, to file an amended lawsuit, which the district's solicitor said it would do. Judge Jeffrey Sommer said the school district must show specific instances of overbilling and said some allegations of the suit, filed in April, were too broad.
NEWS
August 12, 2015 | BY JULIE SHAW, Daily News Staff Writer shawj@phillynews.com, 215-854-2592
THIS CASE MAY have you scratching your heads. It started out as a defamation case pitting a dog-rights activist, Jenny Stephens, against the state's former top dog-law enforcer, Jessie Smith, and Smith's attorney, Andrew Barbin. But what it really boiled down to was a question about attorneys and what protection they have when they send copies of lawsuits to the media for publication. A Philadelphia civil jury yesterday found that Stephens, of Montgomery County, who was also a blogger, was defamed by Barbin after he sent a lawsuit he filed against her to the Inquirer . The jury awarded Stephens $100,000 in compensatory and punitive damages.
NEWS
August 12, 2015 | By Angelo Fichera, Inquirer Staff Writer
A white Paulsboro municipal employee is suing several minority elected officials for what she describes as a racially charged attempt to oust her. The shake-up surrounding borough administrator LeeAnn Ruggeri's employment became public earlier this year, when she was removed from her role as interim chief financial officer after she did not complete the necessary classes to earn the certification required to remain in the post permanently. The borough's 2014 audit found that the interim CFO - who at the time was Ruggeri - did not properly maintain the general ledger, failed to reconcile bank accounts, and overspent accounts.
NEWS
July 26, 2015 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Common Pleas Court judge this week dismissed a lawsuit against the Philadelphia School District and its teachers' union that tried to end a long-held practice of allowing union employees to remain on the public payroll. Judge Linda Carpenter ruled Wednesday that the Harrisburg-based group Americans for Fair Treatment did not have standing to pursue its complaint. The group, represented by the nonprofit Fairness Center, alleged that the practice was illegal, even though the Philadelphia Federation of Teachers pays the workers' salaries and benefits.
NEWS
July 24, 2015 | BY JULIE SHAW, Daily News Staff Writer shawj@phillynews.com, 215-854-2592
A MAN WHO has claimed he was sexually abused as a child by a Catholic priest in the rectory of St. John Cantius Parish in Bridesburg has filed a lawsuit against the priest and the Archdiocese of Philadelphia. The man, now 27, has accused the Rev. Andrew McCormick, now 59, of sexually assaulting him in 1997, when the man was a 10-year-old altar boy. Two criminal juries - one on March 11 of this year, another on March 12, 2014 - deadlocked on charges of involuntary deviate sexual intercourse, sexual assault, indecent assault of a person less than 13 years old, child endangerment and corruption of a minor against McCormick.
NEWS
July 1, 2015 | BY JOE BRANDT, Daily News Staff Writer brandtj@phillynews.com, 215-854-4890
BOB GILDERSLEEVE SR. sees a connection between politics and his son's May 12 death in the derailment of Amtrak Train 188. After thinking about the crash in recent weeks, he's come to believe that more money should be spent on safety. "I just wish Congress would re-look at this," he told the Daily News last night. "Money is leaking out of these [public] institutions. " The widow of his son Bob Gildersleeve Jr. filed a wrongful death lawsuit against the federally subsidized rail company yesterday.
NEWS
July 1, 2015 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
The survivors of two men killed in the May 12 Amtrak crash in Philadelphia filed wrongful-death lawsuits Monday. The widow of Robert Gildersleeve Jr. alleged that Amtrak's negligence caused last month's derailment, which injured scores and killed eight passengers, including the Maryland executive. A second suit was filed Monday by Jacqueline Mercita Gaines of Plainsboro, N.J., over the death of her husband, James Marshall Gaines, an Associated Press video-software architect. Gaines, a 48-year-old father of two, died of a severe chest wound at Temple University Hospital a few hours after the crash.
NEWS
June 18, 2015 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writer difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
FREDERICK SMITH was miffed. You'd be, too, if you parked your car at the curb, walked immediately to the parking kiosk to pay and returned seconds later to find a meter maid writing a ticket. Smith used some unpleasant language on that hazy May 19 afternoon at 12th and Chestnut in Center City. The Philadelphia Parking Authority ticket-writer, no doubt used to foul-mouthed freak-outs, calmly explained that the ticket was for expired inspection stickers, rather than any parking offense.
NEWS
June 17, 2015 | BY JULIE SHAW, Daily News Staff Writer shawj@phillynews.com, 215-854-2592
CHANGES COULD BE coming to the way Philadelphia seizes property under its civil-forfeiture program. The program - aimed at stopping drug activity - has caught innocent people in its net, violating their constitutional rights, critics say. Lawyers on both sides of a federal civil lawsuit yesterday told U.S. District Judge Eduardo Robreno that the parties are close to settling the first two of the plaintiffs' six claims in the lawsuit. A status report filed by lawyers for the city and the District Attorney's Office - the defendants in the lawsuit - also said three more claims could be settled.
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