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NEWS
August 22, 2012 | By Wayne Parry, Associated Press
ATLANTIC CITY - At first, it seemed like a coincidence, the kind of thing that happens from time to time at a casino, where the same number or same sequence of cards occurs twice in a row. But when the players at an April game of mini-baccarat at the Golden Nugget Atlantic City kept seeing the same sequence of cards dealt, over and over and over again, their eyes grew wide and their bets grew bigger, zooming from $10 a hand to $5,000. Forty-one consecutive winning hands later, the 14 players had racked up more than $1.5 million in winnings - surrounded by casino security convinced they had cheated but unable to prove how. In a lawsuit against a Kansas City playing card manufacturer, the Golden Nugget contends the cards were unshuffled, despite being promised to be preshuffled and ready to use. The April 30 incident was the latest instance of unshuffled decks of cards causing headaches for an Atlantic City casino.
NEWS
December 14, 1989 | By Denise-Marie Santiago, Inquirer Staff Writer
A prison inmate who wrote a 583-page cookbook while serving a life sentence for murder is suing a Montgomery County man who he says promised to help publish it. Bernard Jerry-El, 43, now at the State Correctional Institution at Pittsburgh, filed the lawsuit against Edward J. Reilly of Devon, who he says took the original copy of his cookbook in 1987 to photocopy and send to publishers. But Reilly lied about his connections with publishers and never returned the cookbook, according to Jerry-El's lawsuit, filed Tuesday in Montgomery County Court.
NEWS
October 22, 1992 | By Mac Daniel, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A Royersford woman has filed suit against her former employer, seeking in excess of $20,000 in damages for what she alleges were various forms of sexual harassment over a half-year period. Hope Lindauer and her husband, C. Michael Lindauer, filed suit Oct. 14 against Berwyn-based Dickson Gabbay Young Inc. and partner James Young, and James A. Donegan and his Wayne security firm, Donegan Security Associates. Lindauer worked at Dickson Gabbay Young Inc. as an administrative assistant.
NEWS
July 21, 1988 | By Yvette Ousley, Special to The Inquirer
Great Valley school board members have voted to support the Chester County Intermediate Unit in its lawsuit filed against the Pennsylvania Department of Education. "I strongly recommend that the board approve support of the intermediate unit's lawsuit," Superintendent William Fitzpatrick told board members at Tuesday evening's board meeting. "The IU operates classes for our students. This will have a direct impact on our district in the future if funding matters continue as they have since 1972.
NEWS
August 14, 1998 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A class-action lawsuit challenging Avalon's "magic bus" campaign against underage drinkers and rowdy parties was expanded this week to include this summer's policy of charging youths under a state law prohibiting underage drinking in a public place. The lawsuit, filed in U.S. District Court in Camden, alleges that Avalon's "zero tolerance" policy has routinely violated the constitutional rights of hundreds of youths spending the summer in Avalon. Lawyers had originally sought a court order barring the town from charging underage drinkers under a borough ordinance barring underage possession of alcohol and prohibiting anyone under 21 from being in the presence of alcohol.
NEWS
April 27, 1991 | By Ross Kerber, Special to The Inquirer
Gloucester County Superior Court Judge John Holston yesterday threw out a lawsuit by three Washington Township residents who had been trying to stop construction of an office complex along Fries Mill Road. Holston ruled that the residents did not show that township officials had acted arbitrarily when they rezoned the property to allow the office complex, being built by developer Frank Lauletta. Three neighbors of the project, Melanie Parvin, Jo Ann Baglini and Eric Pfister, sued the township in July 1989.
SPORTS
June 9, 2003 | Daily News Wire Services
Atlantic Coast Conference commissioner John Swofford thinks a lawsuit aimed at disrupting the conference's expansion won't succeed because the league and schools followed proper guidelines. "NCAA institutions are free to associate with other institutions that they deem most in harmony with their academic and athletic mission," Swofford said yesterday. "The ACC has acted properly and legally throughout this process and is unaware of any conduct by Miami, Boston College or Syracuse that would violate the terms of their by-laws or that could bind them to the Big East against their will.
SPORTS
April 20, 1999 | Daily News Wire Services
The women's basketball coach at Hampton University, her husband and an assistant coach filed a $30 million lawsuit yesterday over their detainment by Lubbock, Texas, police who were investigating an alleged scam. The lawsuit contends police engaged in racially discriminatory behavior when they detained coach Patricia Bibbs, her husband Ezell and assistant coach Vanetta Kelso on Nov. 16. All three, who are black, have said they believe race played a role in how they were treated.
NEWS
October 2, 1993 | By Reid Kanaley, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A federal judge has dismissed a $1 million civil rights lawsuit filed by a Drexel Hill couple who blamed Delaware County officials for the crib death of the baby they were trying to adopt. "I cannot permit such a case to go to a jury," U.S. District Judge Lowell A. Reed Jr. wrote in an opinion filed this week in Philadelphia. "Plaintiffs must present more than mere allegations, bare assertions or simple suspicions. " The case was filed in December by Ed and Joan Young. The Youngs had been in the process of adopting their 10-month-old foster son, whom they called Jed, when the child died on April 2, 1991.
SPORTS
February 8, 2012 | STAFF AND WIRE REPORTS
LAWYERS ARE seeking class-action status for a lawsuit that claims Baseball Hall of Famer George Brett has been falsely advertising necklaces and bracelets as being able to help improve health and sports performance. A lawsuit filed Monday in federal court in Des Moines, Iowa, claims Spokane Valley, Wash.-based Brett Bros. Sports International Inc. has falsely claimed its Ionic Necklaces help customers relieve pain in the neck, shoulders and upper back, recover from sports fatigue and improve focus.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 21, 2016 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Staff Writer
Jim Carrey hit with lawsuit On Monday, Jim Carrey was hit with a wrongful-death lawsuit stemming from the September 2015 suicide of his ex-girlfriend Cathriona White . Filed in Los Angeles by White's widower, Mark Burton , the suit charges that the opioid painkillers White used to kill herself were illegally obtained by Carrey. The suit claims Carrey got the drugs under the assumed name Arthur King and gave them to White despite knowing she was "prone to depression and had previously attempted to take her own life.
NEWS
September 16, 2016 | By Claudia Vargas and Tricia L. Nadolny, STAFF WRITERS
The American Beverage Association, along with some Philadelphia residents and businesses, filed suit Wednesday to block the city's recently enacted sweetened-beverage tax, arguing it is unconstitutional. The lawsuit was filed in Common Pleas Court, but lawyers for the plaintiffs are asking that the state Supreme Court take up the case. They are seeking an injunction to stop the city from collecting the tax, which goes into effect Jan. 1. "The Supreme Court will doubtlessly decide the case eventually," said Shanin Specter, the attorney representing the 10 plaintiffs.
NEWS
September 16, 2016 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Staff Writer
A Philadelphia judge scolded Ikea's attorneys Wednesday for ignoring his order to turn over records to the parents of a child killed by a toppled Ikea dresser that has since been recalled. Judge John Milton Younge said he was likely to impose sanctions on the company but would wait two more weeks to see if Superior Court rules on a request by Ikea to stay or overturn his order. During the brief hearing in a City Hall courtroom, Ikea lawyer Andrew Susko did not offer much explanation, except to say the company is waiting on the appeal.
NEWS
September 15, 2016 | By Chris Mondics, Staff Writer
President Obama is threatening to veto legislation that would make it easier for victims of the Sept. 11, 2001, terror attacks to sue Saudi Arabia. Supporters of the bill vow that they will push for a congressional override. The measure is an outgrowth of a long-running lawsuit against the government of Saudi Arabia by 9/11 victims and their families, who claim that the Saudis funded Islamist charities that in turn bankrolled al-Qaeda. The suit was filed by the Center City firm of Cozen O'Connor, which was instrumental in pushing for enactment of the bill.
NEWS
September 14, 2016 | By Kristen A. Graham, Staff Writer
With trumpets and speeches, a drum line and song, students, teachers, politicians and others rallied Monday for education funding in advance of an important Pennsylvania Supreme Court hearing on the matter. The high court will hear arguments Tuesday in a lawsuit charging that the state has abdicated its responsibility to adequately fund school districts across the commonwealth. Parents, including two from Philadelphia, and districts including the William Penn system in Delaware County sued the state in 2014.
NEWS
September 1, 2016 | By Caitlin McCabe, Staff Writer
Having lost the right to build on a 213-acre tract owned by the Archdiocese of Philadelphia, a Jenkintown developer filed a lawsuit Monday against Marple Township, accusing its commissioners of robbing him of more than $7 million by suddenly opposing his plan after privately supporting it for months. The complaint from Bruce Goodman, acting as Cardinal Crossing Realty Associates L.P., comes nearly two months after his $47 million deal to build on the church land - the size of 163 football fields - crumbled in the eleventh hour as he failed to win township approval.
NEWS
August 25, 2016 | By Barbara Boyer, Staff Writer
The New Jersey Supreme Court ruled Tuesday that a Voorhees man, seriously injured in 2010 while trying to surf on a wave machine at a water park, can proceed with a gross-negligence lawsuit. Roy Steinberg, 52, filed a civil lawsuit against Sahara Sam's Oasis in Berlin, Camden County, saying workers failed to instruct him properly about how to surf safely on the FlowRider, and that the park did not adequately warn him about the risk of serious injury on the machine, which simulates ocean waves.
BUSINESS
August 24, 2016 | By Jason Laughlin, Staff Writer
A federal judge has tossed out a Philadelphia taxi company's lawsuit that claimed Uber was trying to destroy the taxicab business. U.S. District Judge Robert Kelly dismissed the case Friday, according to court documents. Sergei Lemberg, the lawyer representing the owners of the small cab business, Coachtrans, said he was seeking certification from Kelly of certain issues in the case, so an appeal could be pursued in Pennsylvania Supreme Court. "The vast majority of medallion owners in Philadelphia and also in other cities are small-time immigrants," Lemberg said, adding that his clients, Boris and Alla Kautsky, depended on their three cab medallions for income.
NEWS
August 14, 2016 | By Andrew Maykuth, STAFF WRITER
Highland Township, a tiny Elk County town that in 2013 approved an ordinance banning natural-gas wastewater injection wells, overturned the ordinance this week and promptly settled a federal lawsuit with a Marcellus Shale gas producer that wants to build a disposal well in the community. Two new supervisors on the township's three-member governing board voted Wednesday to rescind the ordinance, saying they were unlikely to prevail in a lawsuit with gas producer Seneca Resources Corp.
NEWS
August 3, 2016 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Staff Writer
Lawyers for CBS have dropped an emergency motion alleging a "judicial conspiracy" that asked the Pennsylvania Supreme Court to delay former CBS3 anchor Alycia Lane's negligence lawsuit against the network. The suit says CBS failed to stop former coanchor Larry Mendte from hacking her email and feeding personal details and photos to gossip columnists. The July 15 motion was marked as withdrawn on Monday, according to the court's website. The notice did not state a reason, and CBS's lead lawyer, John M. Elliott, could not be reached for comment.
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