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Lawsuit

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NEWS
August 22, 2012 | By Wayne Parry, Associated Press
ATLANTIC CITY - At first, it seemed like a coincidence, the kind of thing that happens from time to time at a casino, where the same number or same sequence of cards occurs twice in a row. But when the players at an April game of mini-baccarat at the Golden Nugget Atlantic City kept seeing the same sequence of cards dealt, over and over and over again, their eyes grew wide and their bets grew bigger, zooming from $10 a hand to $5,000. Forty-one consecutive winning hands later, the 14 players had racked up more than $1.5 million in winnings - surrounded by casino security convinced they had cheated but unable to prove how. In a lawsuit against a Kansas City playing card manufacturer, the Golden Nugget contends the cards were unshuffled, despite being promised to be preshuffled and ready to use. The April 30 incident was the latest instance of unshuffled decks of cards causing headaches for an Atlantic City casino.
NEWS
December 14, 1989 | By Denise-Marie Santiago, Inquirer Staff Writer
A prison inmate who wrote a 583-page cookbook while serving a life sentence for murder is suing a Montgomery County man who he says promised to help publish it. Bernard Jerry-El, 43, now at the State Correctional Institution at Pittsburgh, filed the lawsuit against Edward J. Reilly of Devon, who he says took the original copy of his cookbook in 1987 to photocopy and send to publishers. But Reilly lied about his connections with publishers and never returned the cookbook, according to Jerry-El's lawsuit, filed Tuesday in Montgomery County Court.
NEWS
October 22, 1992 | By Mac Daniel, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A Royersford woman has filed suit against her former employer, seeking in excess of $20,000 in damages for what she alleges were various forms of sexual harassment over a half-year period. Hope Lindauer and her husband, C. Michael Lindauer, filed suit Oct. 14 against Berwyn-based Dickson Gabbay Young Inc. and partner James Young, and James A. Donegan and his Wayne security firm, Donegan Security Associates. Lindauer worked at Dickson Gabbay Young Inc. as an administrative assistant.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 9, 2011 | By Mark Kennedy, Associated Press
Director Julie Taymor filed a lawsuit Tuesday against the producers of Spider-Man: Turn Off the Dark , alleging they violated her creative rights and have not compensated her for the work she put into Broadway's most expensive musical. The show's spokesman said he was not aware of the lawsuit, filed in federal court in New York. Taymor was not available to comment. Taymor, who had been the Spider-Man director and cowriter of the book, was fired in March from the $75 million production featuring music by U2's Bono and the Edge, after years of delays, accidents, and critical backlash.
NEWS
July 21, 1988 | By Yvette Ousley, Special to The Inquirer
Great Valley school board members have voted to support the Chester County Intermediate Unit in its lawsuit filed against the Pennsylvania Department of Education. "I strongly recommend that the board approve support of the intermediate unit's lawsuit," Superintendent William Fitzpatrick told board members at Tuesday evening's board meeting. "The IU operates classes for our students. This will have a direct impact on our district in the future if funding matters continue as they have since 1972.
NEWS
August 14, 1998 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A class-action lawsuit challenging Avalon's "magic bus" campaign against underage drinkers and rowdy parties was expanded this week to include this summer's policy of charging youths under a state law prohibiting underage drinking in a public place. The lawsuit, filed in U.S. District Court in Camden, alleges that Avalon's "zero tolerance" policy has routinely violated the constitutional rights of hundreds of youths spending the summer in Avalon. Lawyers had originally sought a court order barring the town from charging underage drinkers under a borough ordinance barring underage possession of alcohol and prohibiting anyone under 21 from being in the presence of alcohol.
NEWS
April 27, 1991 | By Ross Kerber, Special to The Inquirer
Gloucester County Superior Court Judge John Holston yesterday threw out a lawsuit by three Washington Township residents who had been trying to stop construction of an office complex along Fries Mill Road. Holston ruled that the residents did not show that township officials had acted arbitrarily when they rezoned the property to allow the office complex, being built by developer Frank Lauletta. Three neighbors of the project, Melanie Parvin, Jo Ann Baglini and Eric Pfister, sued the township in July 1989.
SPORTS
June 9, 2003 | Daily News Wire Services
Atlantic Coast Conference commissioner John Swofford thinks a lawsuit aimed at disrupting the conference's expansion won't succeed because the league and schools followed proper guidelines. "NCAA institutions are free to associate with other institutions that they deem most in harmony with their academic and athletic mission," Swofford said yesterday. "The ACC has acted properly and legally throughout this process and is unaware of any conduct by Miami, Boston College or Syracuse that would violate the terms of their by-laws or that could bind them to the Big East against their will.
SPORTS
April 20, 1999 | Daily News Wire Services
The women's basketball coach at Hampton University, her husband and an assistant coach filed a $30 million lawsuit yesterday over their detainment by Lubbock, Texas, police who were investigating an alleged scam. The lawsuit contends police engaged in racially discriminatory behavior when they detained coach Patricia Bibbs, her husband Ezell and assistant coach Vanetta Kelso on Nov. 16. All three, who are black, have said they believe race played a role in how they were treated.
NEWS
October 2, 1993 | By Reid Kanaley, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A federal judge has dismissed a $1 million civil rights lawsuit filed by a Drexel Hill couple who blamed Delaware County officials for the crib death of the baby they were trying to adopt. "I cannot permit such a case to go to a jury," U.S. District Judge Lowell A. Reed Jr. wrote in an opinion filed this week in Philadelphia. "Plaintiffs must present more than mere allegations, bare assertions or simple suspicions. " The case was filed in December by Ed and Joan Young. The Youngs had been in the process of adopting their 10-month-old foster son, whom they called Jed, when the child died on April 2, 1991.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 1, 2015 | By Matt Gelb, Inquirer Staff Writer
For years, the man identified in court documents as John Doe 187 said he harbored thoughts of suicide - crippled by a "dark anger that was suffocating my soul. " The depression eased, he said, after he approached lawyers with allegations that a Philadelphia priest had abused him when he was a child, and he said he was prepared to testify against the priest at trial. That never happened. The man's lawsuit, filed in 2011 against the Archdiocese of Philadelphia, was settled last month - less than two months after the church settled a suit filed by another man who alleged that he, too, had been sexually abused as a boy by a priest.
NEWS
April 30, 2015 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writer difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
THE MOTHER of a man killed by police during a December car stop in Frankford filed a class-action lawsuit today on behalf of all citizens abused by Philadelphia police. The lawsuit, filed by Tanya Brown-Dickerson, mother of Brandon Tate-Brown, asks a judge to order the reforms recommended in a recent federal Justice Department report and appoint an administrator to ensure compliance. The Justice Department report, released last month, found that police had shot, on average, 49 people a year since 2007.
BUSINESS
April 27, 2015 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
The speedy growth of Nicholas Schorsch 's real estate empire of 4,000 Walmarts, Red Lobsters , and other chain locations stalled last fall, when his publicly traded investment firm, American Realty Capital Properties , admitted falsely inflating profits. Last month, the company restated three years of earnings, acknowledged millions in unreported losses, and replaced top bosses. American Realty's admission - amid what the company said are investigations by federal prosecutors in New York, securities regulators in Massachusetts, and the Securities and Exchange Commission - has given investors ammunition to fix blame for the $3 billion decline in the company's share value since last fall.
NEWS
April 23, 2015 | BY SOLOMON LEACH, Daily News Staff Writer leachs@phillynews.com, 215-854-5903
COMMONWEALTH Court yesterday dismissed a lawsuit accusing the state of failing to adequately and equitably fund Pennsylvania public schools. The complaint was filed by six school districts, seven parents, the Pennsylvania Association of Rural and Small Schools and the NAACP Pennsylvania State Conference, who said they plan to appeal to the state Supreme Court. "This is a question of paramount importance to all Pennsylvanians, and we always knew this would ultimately be decided by the Pennsylvania Supreme Court," Public Interest Law Center of Philadelphia executive director Jennifer Clarke, a member of the legal team representing the plaintiffs, said in a statement.
NEWS
April 8, 2015 | By Susan Snyder and Jason Laughlin, Inquirer Staff Writers
Pennsylvania State University this week is looking to end one of the remaining lawsuits filed by a victim of the Jerry Sandusky child sex-abuse scandal, according to sources. The school's board of trustees is scheduled to meet Thursday morning to discuss "potential settlements" and possibly vote, said spokeswoman Lisa Powers. She did not provide details, but sources familiar with the case said Penn State was seeking to settle with a victim of Sandusky, a former assistant football coach convicted in 2012 of 45 counts related to sexual abuse of 10 children.
BUSINESS
April 6, 2015 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Columnist
The ominous letter from the prosecutor's office was addressed to her grandfather, Albert Lachowicz, but it came to Jennifer Paczan because she was handling his finances. Even five years later, the Pennsylvania woman still recalls her reactions: first worried, then confused, and, finally, outraged on his behalf. The letter was signed by Beaver County District Attorney Anthony J. Berosh, and was on the D.A.'s letterhead. It said Berosh's office had received reports alleging that Lachowicz had engaged in "criminal activity" by "issuing a fraudulent check.
NEWS
March 27, 2015 | By Chris Brennan, Inquirer Staff Writer
It was the most effective - and clearly cynical - strategy employed in Philadelphia politics in decades. "Republicans did it," went the claim from Mayor John F. Street's 2003 reelection campaign, suggesting that an FBI listening device discovered in his City Hall office was a GOP political dirty trick. Frank Keel, a political consultant who calls developing that strategy for Street the "defining moment" of his career, sued David Axelrod on Tuesday for taking the credit in his new memoir, Believer, My 40 Years in Politics.
NEWS
March 14, 2015 | By Melanie Burney, Inquirer Staff Writer
The head of the Monmouth County, N.J., branch of the SPCA has resigned amid allegations that he sent racist, sexist, and homophobic text messages to employees. Victor "Buddy" Amato is accused of disparaging women, African Americans, Jewish people, and gays in dozens of messages, according to a lawsuit filed last week in Superior Court in Freehold. The lawsuit was filed by Sue DesMarais of Jackson, an animal-cruelty investigator, who says she lost her job when she complained to her superiors about the text messages.
NEWS
March 14, 2015 | By Barbara Boyer, Inquirer Staff Writer
The New Jersey Supreme Court has ended a civil lawsuit that alleged in part that overgrown bushes caused a 2008 fatal collision in Willingboro between a car and a motorcycle. Thursday's ruling reinstated a lower court decision that found fault with an expert opinion that the bushes blocked the driver's view, causing the collision that killed motorcyclist Alvin J. Townsend Jr., 28, of East Windsor, N.J. "No facts in the record support plaintiffs' contention that the shrubbery on the property was a proximate cause of the fatal collision," the Supreme Court ruled in a unanimous decision.
NEWS
March 13, 2015 | BY REGINA MEDINA, Daily News Staff Writer medinar@phillynews.com, 215-854-5985
THREE RETIRED Philadelphia School District teachers have filed a federal lawsuit against the School Reform Commission, former chairman Bill Green, the city and other parties for allegedly violating their constitutional rights during an SRC meeting. The trio - Ilene Poses, Lisa Haver and Barbara Dowdall - say the violations occurred during a Feb. 18 meeting at which commissioners voted on charter-school applications, according to the suit filed Tuesday in U.S. District Court in Philadelphia.
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