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Lawsuit

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NEWS
August 22, 2012 | By Wayne Parry, Associated Press
ATLANTIC CITY - At first, it seemed like a coincidence, the kind of thing that happens from time to time at a casino, where the same number or same sequence of cards occurs twice in a row. But when the players at an April game of mini-baccarat at the Golden Nugget Atlantic City kept seeing the same sequence of cards dealt, over and over and over again, their eyes grew wide and their bets grew bigger, zooming from $10 a hand to $5,000. Forty-one consecutive winning hands later, the 14 players had racked up more than $1.5 million in winnings - surrounded by casino security convinced they had cheated but unable to prove how. In a lawsuit against a Kansas City playing card manufacturer, the Golden Nugget contends the cards were unshuffled, despite being promised to be preshuffled and ready to use. The April 30 incident was the latest instance of unshuffled decks of cards causing headaches for an Atlantic City casino.
NEWS
December 14, 1989 | By Denise-Marie Santiago, Inquirer Staff Writer
A prison inmate who wrote a 583-page cookbook while serving a life sentence for murder is suing a Montgomery County man who he says promised to help publish it. Bernard Jerry-El, 43, now at the State Correctional Institution at Pittsburgh, filed the lawsuit against Edward J. Reilly of Devon, who he says took the original copy of his cookbook in 1987 to photocopy and send to publishers. But Reilly lied about his connections with publishers and never returned the cookbook, according to Jerry-El's lawsuit, filed Tuesday in Montgomery County Court.
NEWS
October 22, 1992 | By Mac Daniel, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A Royersford woman has filed suit against her former employer, seeking in excess of $20,000 in damages for what she alleges were various forms of sexual harassment over a half-year period. Hope Lindauer and her husband, C. Michael Lindauer, filed suit Oct. 14 against Berwyn-based Dickson Gabbay Young Inc. and partner James Young, and James A. Donegan and his Wayne security firm, Donegan Security Associates. Lindauer worked at Dickson Gabbay Young Inc. as an administrative assistant.
NEWS
July 21, 1988 | By Yvette Ousley, Special to The Inquirer
Great Valley school board members have voted to support the Chester County Intermediate Unit in its lawsuit filed against the Pennsylvania Department of Education. "I strongly recommend that the board approve support of the intermediate unit's lawsuit," Superintendent William Fitzpatrick told board members at Tuesday evening's board meeting. "The IU operates classes for our students. This will have a direct impact on our district in the future if funding matters continue as they have since 1972.
NEWS
August 14, 1998 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A class-action lawsuit challenging Avalon's "magic bus" campaign against underage drinkers and rowdy parties was expanded this week to include this summer's policy of charging youths under a state law prohibiting underage drinking in a public place. The lawsuit, filed in U.S. District Court in Camden, alleges that Avalon's "zero tolerance" policy has routinely violated the constitutional rights of hundreds of youths spending the summer in Avalon. Lawyers had originally sought a court order barring the town from charging underage drinkers under a borough ordinance barring underage possession of alcohol and prohibiting anyone under 21 from being in the presence of alcohol.
NEWS
April 27, 1991 | By Ross Kerber, Special to The Inquirer
Gloucester County Superior Court Judge John Holston yesterday threw out a lawsuit by three Washington Township residents who had been trying to stop construction of an office complex along Fries Mill Road. Holston ruled that the residents did not show that township officials had acted arbitrarily when they rezoned the property to allow the office complex, being built by developer Frank Lauletta. Three neighbors of the project, Melanie Parvin, Jo Ann Baglini and Eric Pfister, sued the township in July 1989.
SPORTS
June 9, 2003 | Daily News Wire Services
Atlantic Coast Conference commissioner John Swofford thinks a lawsuit aimed at disrupting the conference's expansion won't succeed because the league and schools followed proper guidelines. "NCAA institutions are free to associate with other institutions that they deem most in harmony with their academic and athletic mission," Swofford said yesterday. "The ACC has acted properly and legally throughout this process and is unaware of any conduct by Miami, Boston College or Syracuse that would violate the terms of their by-laws or that could bind them to the Big East against their will.
SPORTS
April 20, 1999 | Daily News Wire Services
The women's basketball coach at Hampton University, her husband and an assistant coach filed a $30 million lawsuit yesterday over their detainment by Lubbock, Texas, police who were investigating an alleged scam. The lawsuit contends police engaged in racially discriminatory behavior when they detained coach Patricia Bibbs, her husband Ezell and assistant coach Vanetta Kelso on Nov. 16. All three, who are black, have said they believe race played a role in how they were treated.
NEWS
October 2, 1993 | By Reid Kanaley, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A federal judge has dismissed a $1 million civil rights lawsuit filed by a Drexel Hill couple who blamed Delaware County officials for the crib death of the baby they were trying to adopt. "I cannot permit such a case to go to a jury," U.S. District Judge Lowell A. Reed Jr. wrote in an opinion filed this week in Philadelphia. "Plaintiffs must present more than mere allegations, bare assertions or simple suspicions. " The case was filed in December by Ed and Joan Young. The Youngs had been in the process of adopting their 10-month-old foster son, whom they called Jed, when the child died on April 2, 1991.
SPORTS
February 8, 2012 | STAFF AND WIRE REPORTS
LAWYERS ARE seeking class-action status for a lawsuit that claims Baseball Hall of Famer George Brett has been falsely advertising necklaces and bracelets as being able to help improve health and sports performance. A lawsuit filed Monday in federal court in Des Moines, Iowa, claims Spokane Valley, Wash.-based Brett Bros. Sports International Inc. has falsely claimed its Ionic Necklaces help customers relieve pain in the neck, shoulders and upper back, recover from sports fatigue and improve focus.
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NEWS
August 14, 2016 | By Andrew Maykuth, STAFF WRITER
Highland Township, a tiny Elk County town that in 2013 approved an ordinance banning natural-gas wastewater injection wells, overturned the ordinance this week and promptly settled a federal lawsuit with a Marcellus Shale gas producer that wants to build a disposal well in the community. Two new supervisors on the township's three-member governing board voted Wednesday to rescind the ordinance, saying they were unlikely to prevail in a lawsuit with gas producer Seneca Resources Corp.
NEWS
August 3, 2016 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Staff Writer
Lawyers for CBS have dropped an emergency motion alleging a "judicial conspiracy" that asked the Pennsylvania Supreme Court to delay former CBS3 anchor Alycia Lane's negligence lawsuit against the network. The suit says CBS failed to stop former coanchor Larry Mendte from hacking her email and feeding personal details and photos to gossip columnists. The July 15 motion was marked as withdrawn on Monday, according to the court's website. The notice did not state a reason, and CBS's lead lawyer, John M. Elliott, could not be reached for comment.
NEWS
July 17, 2016 | By Julie Shaw, Staff Writer
A third lawsuit has been filed against a South Jersey jail warden following the deaths of four inmates in recent years at the Cumberland County Jail in Bridgeton. The suit was filed Tuesday in federal court in Camden on behalf of the family of David Hennis, an inmate found hanging in the infirmary on July 30, 2014, lawyer Conrad Benedetto said in a news release Friday. According to Vineland police, Hennis, 31, of Vineland, was arrested and charged July 22 with aggravated assault and weapons offenses, and was sent to the jail on $30,000 bail.
NEWS
July 9, 2016 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Staff Writer
More than 21/2 years after the fourth-floor balcony of a Center City apartment collapsed, killing one man and seriously injuring two women, the final piece of a $1.23 million award for the victims has been approved. The June 27 approval of a $610,000 award for the parents of the late Albert Suh by Philadelphia Common Pleas Court Administrative Judge Matthew D. Carrafiello ended litigation involving the Jan. 12, 2014, collapse at 229 S. 22nd St. The approval was one day before Mayor Kenney signed legislation approved June 16 by City Council requiring property owners to have outside balconies and fire escapes inspected and tested by an engineer every five years.
NEWS
June 26, 2016 | By Stacey Burling, Staff Writer
An Iraq War veteran in York County, Pa., has filed a federal lawsuit claiming she was denied a type of physical therapy because she has HIV. The 40-year-old woman, whose suit was filed under the pseudonym Bonnie Jones, said she sought help from OSS Orthopaedic Hospital in York for chronic spine pain and limited range of motion. She said the pain resulted from wearing a bulletproof vest for an extended period. Drayer Physical Therapy Institute, which operates physical therapy services at the hospital, and Timothy Burch, a physical therapist, also were named in the suit, filed by the AIDS Law Project of Pennsylvania.
NEWS
June 24, 2016 | By Angela Couloumbis and Maria Panaritis, STAFF WRITERS
HARRISBURG - A Senate committee is preparing to strip out the most contentious aspect of a bill that would expand the ability of child sex-abuse victims to sue for decades-old attacks, according to two legislative sources familiar with the move. The Republicans who control the Judiciary Committee could as soon as this week remove the provision that would apply the law retroactively, said the sources, who said they were not authorized to publicly discuss the plan. Hailed by victims' advocates, the language would have opened the door to a wave of lawsuits for child-sex abuse that occurred as far back as the 1970s.
NEWS
June 15, 2016 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Staff Writer
Pennsylvania's Supreme Court has refused to block a judge's order requiring the Philadelphia District Attorney's Office to surrender three cellphones for examination by lawyers in litigation from the deadly 2013 Salvation Army collapse. In a one-sentence ruling Friday, the high court unanimously rejected the district attorney's request to stay a May 23 order by Common Pleas Court Judge Mark I. Bernstein punishing prosecutors for not turning over the cellphones. The ruling is final, and the District Attorney's Office on Monday released a statement saying it would comply with Bernstein's order.
NEWS
May 27, 2016 | By Barbara Boyer, Staff Writer
Two high-ranking officials in the Somerset County (N.J.) Prosecutor's Office are retiring in the wake of allegations that authorities failed to properly collect and store evidence, and destroyed other evidence, in the 2014 investigation of the deaths of Cooper Health System CEO John P. Sheridan Jr. and his wife. The office's deputy chief of detectives, Steven Ughetta, and chief of detectives, Timothy M. Fitzgerald, will retire Tuesday, acting Prosecutor Michael Robertson confirmed Wednesday.
NEWS
May 26, 2016 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Staff Writer
A jury this month awarded developer Ori Feibush $34,000 in his lawsuit against City Councilman Kenyatta Johnson, but the city could be on the hook for far more. Feibush's lawyer has filed a motion seeking $116,393.12 in attorney fees. That covers 187.1 hours of work - plus a 25 percent bonus. "The total number of hours worked is more than reasonable," Feibush's attorney, Wally Zimolong, wrote in the motion, filed Monday. "This litigation lasted for over a year. ... Indeed, the actual total number of hours expended by counsel for Feibush is likely much higher.
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