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NEWS
September 25, 2003 | By George Anastasia INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's a lot of mozzarella. More than 600 tons, in fact, worth more than $1.5 million wholesale, say its producers. It was delivered from California in a series of shipments in May and June to a local distributor based in Marlton. But that is about all that Valley Gold, the manufacturer, and Joseph Profaci, the recipient, agree on. Lawyers for both sides spent more than two hours in U.S. District Court in Camden yesterday churning the issues in a breach-of-contract/fraud case based on a civil complaint filed last month by Valley Gold.
NEWS
April 29, 2016 | By Angela Couloumbis, Mark Fazlollah, and Craig R. McCoy, STAFF WRITERS
Former Pennsylvania State Treasurer Rob McCord secretly cooperated with federal prosecutors in a corruption investigation while in office and wore a body wire to record conversations with others, the Inquirer has learned. He surreptitiously recorded, among others, a major donor to Pennsylvania politicians whose company made millions helping to invest the public's money, four people familiar with the matter said. McCord, who pleaded guilty to attempted extortion in February 2015 but whose sentence has been delayed for months, wore the wire before he entered his plea.
NEWS
October 20, 1991 | By Daniel Rubin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Leonard J. Schwartz, 92, an attorney for 70 years with the law firm of Fox, Rothschild, O'Brien & Frankel, died Friday at his Rittenhouse Square home. Mr. Schwartz was born in Russia and immigrated to the United States at age 7. He went on to help develop the state's worker-compensation law. He attended South Philadelphia High School and was elected president of the Class of 1919. He enrolled at the University of Pennsylvania with the intention of becoming an engineer. While in school, his interests shifted toward law and he transferred to Temple University, where he earned his law degree.
NEWS
June 5, 2016 | By Samantha Melamed, Staff Writer
Philadelphia is home to more people sentenced as juveniles to life without parole than anyplace else in the world - about 300 inmates, all due a second chance under a U.S. Supreme Court ruling that found automatic life sentences for juveniles to be unconstitutional. On Friday, the first two inmates to be resentenced in Philadelphia struck agreements that will make them immediately eligible for parole. The sentences, of 35 years to life, offer the first glimpses of how Judge Lillian Ransom, who is overseeing the process, and District Attorney Seth Williams intend to handle these cases - and will soon be among the first tests of whether the state parole board will release people convicted of first- or second-degree murder, a question it has not faced in recent memory.
NEWS
May 21, 1986 | By JIM NICHOLSON, Daily News Staff Writer
Herman J. Obert, an attorney for nearly 50 years, died Monday. He was 75 and lived in Bryn Mawr. A Philadelphia lawyer who specialized in probate, charitable trusts and construction, he was a member of the firm of Monteverde, Hemphill, Maschmeyer & Obert. He previously had been a member in the firm of Gibbons, Eustace & Obert. He was active in the Catholic Charities organization and represented a number of orders and societies. The son of a Roxborough brewer, Obert was educated at Georgetown Preparatory School and was a graduate of Georgetown University and Temple University Law School.
NEWS
December 25, 1986 | By Robert J. Terry, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Philadelphia lawyer yesterday was charged with assaulting a narcotics police officer after he threw punches at him in a City Hall courtroom and had to be subdued by other officers, police said. The lawyer, Darryl Irwin, 39, was representing a man charged with drug violations and was awaiting a court hearing shortly before noon when the incident occurred. Police said the officer, Jorge Cruz, was standing in a hallway outside the second-floor courtroom, reviewing his file on Irwin's client when the lawyer told him, "There's no need to read that stuff.
NEWS
May 17, 2001 | By Dominic Sama INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Paul Maloney, 93, of Bryn Mawr, a retired Center City fiduciary lawyer and former president of the Citizens Crime Commission of Philadelphia, died at his home Monday of complications from diabetes. Mr. Maloney practiced for more than 40 years, specializing in administering estates and trusts. He started in 1936 with the Center City law firm of Evans, Bayard & Frick and remained there until the start of World War II, when he entered the Navy. He was assigned to the Navy's Office of the General Counsel in Washington.
NEWS
February 28, 2008 | By Kristen A. Graham INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A Philadelphia lawyer pleaded guilty to forging a court document yesterday in New Jersey Superior Court in Camden. Rather than tell a client that a case had been dismissed, Nina E. Perris, 48, gave him a forged court order that said he would receive money for injuries received when a security gate fell on him in Virginia. The client showed the document to another lawyer, who recognized it was not an official court order and took it to the Camden County Prosecutor's Office.
NEWS
May 20, 2013
BALTIMORE - Benjamin Lipsitz, a lawyer who defended the man who tried to kill George Wallace, died May 10. He was 94. Lipsitz was chosen to defend Arthur Bremer, accused of shooting Wallace, a Democratic presidential candidate, and three others, including a Secret Service agent, at a Laurel, Md., shopping center on May 15, 1972. Bremer called his lawyer "my only friend. " With his daughter, Eleanor J. Lipsitz, as co-counsel, he conducted a strong defense in Prince George's Circuit Court.
NEWS
June 16, 2010 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Harold Sills, 97, of Bala Cynwyd, a Philadelphia lawyer and social institution, died of aortic stenosis Sunday, June 13, at home. Mr. Sills maintained a general law practice in Center City for 40 years. Then in 1985, at 72, he became general counsel for ICD, in King of Prussia, a subsidiary of Confab Corp. When Confab was purchased by Tyco Corp. in 1998, Mr. Sills and all senior executives were terminated. Two weeks later, his daughter Judith Sills said, he was called to meet with the new CEO, who acknowledged making an error in judgment and rehired Mr. Sills as general counsel.
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NEWS
July 17, 2016 | By Julie Shaw, Staff Writer
A third lawsuit has been filed against a South Jersey jail warden following the deaths of four inmates in recent years at the Cumberland County Jail in Bridgeton. The suit was filed Tuesday in federal court in Camden on behalf of the family of David Hennis, an inmate found hanging in the infirmary on July 30, 2014, lawyer Conrad Benedetto said in a news release Friday. According to Vineland police, Hennis, 31, of Vineland, was arrested and charged July 22 with aggravated assault and weapons offenses, and was sent to the jail on $30,000 bail.
NEWS
July 13, 2016 | By Laura McCrystal and Jeremy Roebuck, STAFF WRITERS
Bill Cosby replaced one of his defense attorneys Monday with another Los Angeles lawyer whose firm has represented celebrity clients. Angela Agrusa of Liner L.L.P. will replace Christopher Tayback on Cosby's legal team in pending criminal and civil litigation, the entertainer's spokesman said Monday. The reason for the change was unclear, as was whether it was initiated by Tayback or Cosby. Agrusa has experience in civil litigation, according to a biography posted on her firm's website.
NEWS
July 11, 2016 | By Michael Matza, Staff Writer
Don't be fooled by his preppy bow tie and conservative suit. Philadelphia lawyer William Stock leads a national army of 14,000 attorneys bent on revolution. On shutting down the family detention centers that hold children arrested with immigrant parents. On eliminating the one-year deadline to apply for asylum. On getting the government to pay for a lawyer for anyone facing deportation. Last month, Stock, 48, became president of the American Immigration Lawyers Association, now in its 70th year.
NEWS
July 10, 2016 | By Susan Snyder and Jeremy Roebuck, STAFF WRITERS
Lawyers for three former Penn State administrators accused of failing to report Jerry Sandusky's sexual abuse of children filed motions last week asking that those charges be dismissed. The Pennsylvania Superior Court in January threw out the most serious charges against former Penn State president Graham B. Spanier, Gary Schultz, and Tim Curley, who were accused of conspiring to cover up Sandusky's abuse. But the men continue to face charges of child endangerment and failure to report suspected child abuse.
NEWS
July 10, 2016
My Father & Atticus Finch By Joseph Madison Beck W.W. Norton. 218 pp. $25.95 Reviewed by Ginny Greene T o Kill a Mockingbird has inspired readers and critics for decades. But what inspired Harper Lee to write her novel? Joseph Madison Beck suggests he may have the answer. In this fast-moving memoir, Beck recounts how his father, a small-town lawyer, was thrown into the 1938 trial of a Northern black man accused of raping a local white woman in a southern Alabama town.
NEWS
July 3, 2016 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Staff Writer
Lawyers for Andrea Constand urged a federal judge Friday to throw out Bill Cosby's bid to make her return the money he paid her a decade ago to settle sexual-assault claims. In a hearing before U.S. District Judge Eduardo Robreno in Philadelphia, the attorneys, Dolores Troiani and Bebe Kivitz, denied allegations by Cosby lawyers that Constand breached a confidentiality clause in the 2006 settlement with the entertainer when she helped prosecutors build a case against him. They said Cosby was the one who first violated the settlement, and suggested that his breach-of-contract lawsuit was intended to have a "chilling effect" on Constand before she testified at his trial in Montgomery County.
NEWS
July 2, 2016 | By Michaelle Bond, Staff Writer
A Chester County lawyer accused of withholding medical care from his 92-year-old father and causing his death was found guilty Thursday of third-degree murder. After deliberating for more than 10 hours, a jury found Edward J. O'Brien III, 61, guilty of all charges - including aggravated assault, involuntary manslaughter, and reckless endangerment - in the 2013 death of Edward J. O'Brien Jr. This was the second trial for the West Whiteland Township man. A jury deadlocked on all charges in February.
NEWS
June 30, 2016 | By Daniel Block, Staff Writer
Back on the witness stand for the second day of his murder trial, Chester County lawyer Edward J. O'Brien III was asked by the prosecutor why, if he cared about his father, he never took him to the Boy Scouts or American Legion events that the elderly man had loved. The defendant replied tersely that his increasingly bedridden father had expressed no interest in such activities, including doctor visits. O'Brien, 61, of West Whiteland Township, is accused of withholding necessary medical care in the 2013 death of 92-year-old Edward J. O'Brien Jr. This is the second time around for the third-degree murder case.
BUSINESS
June 30, 2016 | By Chris Mondics, STAFF WRITER
Center City's Blank Rome said Tuesday that four lawyers and additional staff from the Los Angeles family-law firm of Phillips Lerner will join the firm effective Friday, adding to its matrimonial and family-law group. The lawyers are Stacy Phillips, Marc Lerner, Kevin Martin, and Pauline Martin. The group provides legal advice in matters such as divorce, custody, paternity, domestic partnerships, and dealing with domestic violence. In addition to her legal practice, Phillips is the author of Divorce: It's All About Control – How to Win the Emotional, Psychological and Legal Wars . cmondics@phillynews.com 215-854-5957 @cmondics
NEWS
June 29, 2016 | By Julia Terruso, Staff Writer
Sitting around a law office that's squeezed into a Center City rowhouse, a dozen lawyers pledged last week to defend any protesters arrested here during the Democratic National Convention. Larry Krasner, a civil rights lawyer for nearly 30 years, pointed to copies of police mug shots he had displayed at the front of the room: Rosa Parks and the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. "At this point in their lives, they were condemned. Now, this one has a holiday. They both have postage stamps," Krasner said.
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