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NEWS
September 25, 2003 | By George Anastasia INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's a lot of mozzarella. More than 600 tons, in fact, worth more than $1.5 million wholesale, say its producers. It was delivered from California in a series of shipments in May and June to a local distributor based in Marlton. But that is about all that Valley Gold, the manufacturer, and Joseph Profaci, the recipient, agree on. Lawyers for both sides spent more than two hours in U.S. District Court in Camden yesterday churning the issues in a breach-of-contract/fraud case based on a civil complaint filed last month by Valley Gold.
NEWS
February 1, 2015 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
A once-prominent Philadelphia lawyer has been disbarred by the Pennsylvania Supreme Court after failing to respond to professional and ethical complaints. The action, which takes effect Feb. 28 and strips Willie Lee Nattiel Jr. of his law license, was published Thursday by the Supreme Court. The 23-page opinion lists 10 charges against Nattiel, most involving mishandling client funds and failures to appear for meetings and court hearings of people he had agreed to represent. Nattiel, 55, could not be reached for comment Friday.
NEWS
October 22, 2015 | By Matt Gelb, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Oxford Circle woman who called herself "sexygirl32" and "freakygirl82" in Internet chat rooms where she offered her 6-year-old daughter for sex listened Tuesday in federal court for nearly two hours as her tragic history was retold by lawyers and a psychologist. Christine Yoder, 33, has the mental capacity of a third grader, the forensic psychologist testified. She suffers from the trauma of being raped by her grandfather. From abusive relationships with other men. From mood disorders.
NEWS
October 20, 1991 | By Daniel Rubin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Leonard J. Schwartz, 92, an attorney for 70 years with the law firm of Fox, Rothschild, O'Brien & Frankel, died Friday at his Rittenhouse Square home. Mr. Schwartz was born in Russia and immigrated to the United States at age 7. He went on to help develop the state's worker-compensation law. He attended South Philadelphia High School and was elected president of the Class of 1919. He enrolled at the University of Pennsylvania with the intention of becoming an engineer. While in school, his interests shifted toward law and he transferred to Temple University, where he earned his law degree.
NEWS
May 21, 1986 | By JIM NICHOLSON, Daily News Staff Writer
Herman J. Obert, an attorney for nearly 50 years, died Monday. He was 75 and lived in Bryn Mawr. A Philadelphia lawyer who specialized in probate, charitable trusts and construction, he was a member of the firm of Monteverde, Hemphill, Maschmeyer & Obert. He previously had been a member in the firm of Gibbons, Eustace & Obert. He was active in the Catholic Charities organization and represented a number of orders and societies. The son of a Roxborough brewer, Obert was educated at Georgetown Preparatory School and was a graduate of Georgetown University and Temple University Law School.
NEWS
December 25, 1986 | By Robert J. Terry, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Philadelphia lawyer yesterday was charged with assaulting a narcotics police officer after he threw punches at him in a City Hall courtroom and had to be subdued by other officers, police said. The lawyer, Darryl Irwin, 39, was representing a man charged with drug violations and was awaiting a court hearing shortly before noon when the incident occurred. Police said the officer, Jorge Cruz, was standing in a hallway outside the second-floor courtroom, reviewing his file on Irwin's client when the lawyer told him, "There's no need to read that stuff.
NEWS
July 25, 2010 | By Joseph Tanfani and Mark Fazlollah, Inquirer Staff Writers
These days, Pennsylvania Chief Justice Ronald D. Castille says he feels betrayed by his onetime lawyer in the Family Court project. "If I was in the Marine Corps, the guy would be stripped of his rank. He'd be drummed out," Castille said of Jeffrey B. Rotwitt, who was getting paid on both sides of the $200 million deal to build a courthouse at 15th and Arch Streets. But that wasn't the case in April. When Castille was first asked about Rotwitt's codeveloper role, he didn't seem upset with Rotwitt at all. Instead, he was angry at being questioned about it. With an Inquirer writer pushing court officials for an explanation, Rotwitt met with Castille, then e-mailed him a suggested "clear statement of the facts": Yes, Rotwitt and Donald Pulver were codevelopers, the statement said, without suggesting it was any sort of problem.
NEWS
May 17, 2001 | By Dominic Sama INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Paul Maloney, 93, of Bryn Mawr, a retired Center City fiduciary lawyer and former president of the Citizens Crime Commission of Philadelphia, died at his home Monday of complications from diabetes. Mr. Maloney practiced for more than 40 years, specializing in administering estates and trusts. He started in 1936 with the Center City law firm of Evans, Bayard & Frick and remained there until the start of World War II, when he entered the Navy. He was assigned to the Navy's Office of the General Counsel in Washington.
NEWS
June 2, 2011 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Arthur Montano, 87, whom the New Jersey Commission on Professionalism in the Law named its 1997 lawyer of the year, died of lung cancer Monday, May 23, at his home in Punta Gorda, Fla. Mr. Montano moved to Florida from Haddonfield in 2000. Mr. Montano, a native of Audubon, Camden County, was president of the Class of 1939 at Audubon High School, where he lettered in football, basketball, and baseball. During World War II, he was a navigator on B-17s and flew bombing missions over Germany in 1945.
NEWS
February 28, 2008 | By Kristen A. Graham INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A Philadelphia lawyer pleaded guilty to forging a court document yesterday in New Jersey Superior Court in Camden. Rather than tell a client that a case had been dismissed, Nina E. Perris, 48, gave him a forged court order that said he would receive money for injuries received when a security gate fell on him in Virginia. The client showed the document to another lawyer, who recognized it was not an official court order and took it to the Camden County Prosecutor's Office.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 31, 2016 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Staff Writer
The lawyer for Griffin Campbell - the demolition contractor convicted in the deadly Center City collapse - told a Philadelphia judge Friday he believes a secret deal with prosecutors kept millionaire property developer Richard Basciano from testifying at Campbell's trial. William D. Hobson made the assertion at a post-conviction hearing on his contention that Campbell's manslaughter conviction should be overturned because of "selective racial prosecution. " Hobson told Common Pleas Court Judge Glenn B. Bronson he believed it was no coincidence that two black men were the only people criminally charged, while Basciano and his architect - both white - were not. Plato A. Marinakos Jr., 49, the architect overseeing demolition of Basciano's properties in the 2100 block of Market Street, was granted immunity from prosecution.
NEWS
January 29, 2016 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Staff Writer
A federal judge on Wednesday called U.S. Rep. Chaka Fattah's decision to prioritize fund-raising for his reelection campaign above paying his lawyers "particularly unfair" but denied a request from his defense team to withdraw from his corruption case. U.S. District Judge Harvey Bartle III said that though the lawyers had not been fully paid in months, they were aware of the time and financial commitments when they signed on to Fattah's case. They ran a risk when they did not require the Philadelphia Democrat to pay their legal fees up front, Bartle wrote in an opinion.
NEWS
January 27, 2016
John Jay Hooker Jr., 85, a Nashville political figure who spent his last days fighting to make physician-assisted suicide legal in Tennessee, died Sunday, a family friend said. Political strategist Tom Ingram said he received a message from one of Mr. Hooker's daughters that he had died in hospice. He had been suffering from metastatic melanoma. Mr. Hooker had brilliant successes early in life as a lawyer. Tapped in 1958 to prosecute the impeachment of a Chattanooga judge accused of accepting bribes from racketeers, he fell into the orbit of Robert Kennedy, who was investigating the Teamsters union.
NEWS
January 23, 2016 | By Angela Couloumbis, HARRISBURG BUREAU
HARRISBURG - The state's judicial ethics court cast a critical eye Thursday on its own investigative agency, seeking more information about what some have called a botched inquiry into offensive emails exchanged by Supreme Court Justice J. Michael Eakin. At a hearing for the justice on Thursday, a three-judge panel requested that the Judicial Conduct Board, which investigates ethics complaints against judges, answer a long list of questions about its initial investigation of Eakin. That inquiry, in late 2014, concluded that Eakin had not violated any ethics rules when he sent or received emails that contained nudity, mocked minorities and illegal immigrants, and made demeaning jokes about women and others.
NEWS
January 23, 2016 | By Julie Shaw and Chris Brennan, STAFF WRITERS
Lawyers for U.S. Rep. Chaka Fattah have asked a federal judge to dismiss them from representing him in his forthcoming federal corruption trial because, they say, they are not getting paid. They also asked U.S. District Judge Harvey Bartle III that their request, made Wednesday, be handled confidentially because of "sensitive" communications that "should be protected from public scrutiny. " Bartle disagreed, making them public Thursday, the same day that nine leaders of the city Democratic Committee, including U.S. Rep. Robert Brady, State Sen. Anthony H. Williams, and City Councilwoman Jannie L. Blackwell, endorsed the 11-term Democratic congressman's bid for reelection.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 21, 2016
DEAR ABBY: I live in Israel, and for the past five years I've been having an affair with a great guy I'll call Yuri. I married very young to a man who is kind and very Orthodox. I love my children and grandchildren. Yuri thinks we should leave our spouses and make a fresh start. (I'm not Orthodox and neither is he.) I am afraid if I do, I may lose my children and grandchildren. On the other hand, I can't survive without Yuri. I have always had lovers since I discovered how Orthodox my husband is - it's a survival thing.
NEWS
January 17, 2016 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Staff Writer
Facing a federal corruption trial this year, U.S. Rep. Chaka Fattah is hoping that revelations of FBI leaks in a separate case involving his son could prove key to fighting off his own charges. In a motion filed Friday, lawyers for the Philadelphia Democrat called for contempt of court hearings against Special Agent Richard J. Haag, the lead FBI investigator in Fattah's racketeering conspiracy case and the probe that led to the conviction last year of Chaka "Chip" Fattah Jr. on bank and tax fraud charges.
NEWS
January 13, 2016 | By Angela Couloumbis and Craig R. McCoy, STAFF WRITERS
On the eve of a critical Senate hearing on her political future, Pennsylvania Attorney General Kathleen G. Kane on Monday asked the state Supreme Court to reinstate her law license. Kane contended that when the high court voted unanimously to temporarily suspend her law license last fall, its opinion was "incurably tainted" by Justice J. Michael Eakin's involvement in the Porngate scandal. Kane said Eakin was aware that she had access to several dozen emails with pornographic and other offensive content that he sent or received on a personal email account.
NEWS
January 13, 2016
SUSPENDED Supreme Court Justice J. Michael Eakin rivals Attorney General Kathleen Kane in his pattern of outrageous behavior. Last week, the Inquirer revealed that, only days before his hearing at which a judicial ethics court ultimately suspended him for his participation in pornographic email exchanges, Eakin tried to stack the deck of key appointments in the Philadelphia court system. He tried, and failed, to wield his influence just before three new Supreme Court justices were about to be sworn in. Bad dog!
NEWS
January 11, 2016 | BY VALERIE RUSS, Staff Writer
ACOMMON PLEAS judge has ruled that a second vote on whether the Rev. Adolphus C. Prince, also known as A. Carl Prince, should keep his job as pastor of Zion Baptist Church can go on as scheduled today. The vote is set for 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the church, Broad and Venango streets. After a 2 1/2-hour hearing yesterday, Common Pleas Judge Nina Wright Padilla denied Prince's motion for a temporary restraining order and injunction to block the vote and reinstate him as pastor. "No matter what I do, a large group of people are not going to be happy," Padilla said before ruling.
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