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NEWS
September 25, 2003 | By George Anastasia INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's a lot of mozzarella. More than 600 tons, in fact, worth more than $1.5 million wholesale, say its producers. It was delivered from California in a series of shipments in May and June to a local distributor based in Marlton. But that is about all that Valley Gold, the manufacturer, and Joseph Profaci, the recipient, agree on. Lawyers for both sides spent more than two hours in U.S. District Court in Camden yesterday churning the issues in a breach-of-contract/fraud case based on a civil complaint filed last month by Valley Gold.
NEWS
July 14, 2014 | By Craig R. McCoy, Inquirer Staff Writer
It was a nasty car crash, but not an extraordinary one. Sherri Berg's Jeep Grand Cherokee was hit hard by a car as she pulled onto a highway. The vehicle spun four times and struck a pole, but no one was hurt. What was extraordinary was the epic legal fight that followed, pitting a father-and-son law firm in Chester County against an industry giant, Nationwide Insurance. Nearly 20 years after the accident, that fight climaxed last month with a court ruling that castigated Nationwide and slammed it with $18 million in punitive damages.
NEWS
April 11, 2014 | BY MENSAH M. DEAN, Daily News Staff Writer deanm@phillynews.com, 215-568-8278
AT LESS than 5 feet tall, Zaria Estes could have been mistaken for a middle-school student in court yesterday. She seemed unsure of the meaning of the word "waive" - as in waiving one's right to a preliminary hearing. But Estes, 15, who was arrested along with two of her friends last month, is the one accused of using a brick to attack a female Temple University student who was walking with her boyfriend on Norris Street near 17th, the District Attorney's Office said. During the March 21 attack, the Temple student was battered with the brick numerous times, causing extensive damage to her face and mouth, authorities said.
NEWS
May 18, 2014 | By Carolyn Davis, Inquirer Staff Writer
The judge strongly urged the defendant in a capital murder case not to do it. His lawyers did the same. But in the end, Raghunandan Yandamuri took his own counsel - and became his own counsel. After a two-hour hearing in Norristown, a Montgomery County Court judge on Friday granted Yandamuri's request to drop his court-appointed lawyer and represent himself at trial this summer. Yandamuri, a citizen of India in the United States on a work visa, faces murder and other charges in the October 2012 deaths of 10-month-old Saanvi Venna and her grandmother Satyavathi Venna, 61, at the Marquis Apartments in King of Prussia.
NEWS
July 25, 2010 | By Joseph Tanfani and Mark Fazlollah, Inquirer Staff Writers
These days, Pennsylvania Chief Justice Ronald D. Castille says he feels betrayed by his onetime lawyer in the Family Court project. "If I was in the Marine Corps, the guy would be stripped of his rank. He'd be drummed out," Castille said of Jeffrey B. Rotwitt, who was getting paid on both sides of the $200 million deal to build a courthouse at 15th and Arch Streets. But that wasn't the case in April. When Castille was first asked about Rotwitt's codeveloper role, he didn't seem upset with Rotwitt at all. Instead, he was angry at being questioned about it. With an Inquirer writer pushing court officials for an explanation, Rotwitt met with Castille, then e-mailed him a suggested "clear statement of the facts": Yes, Rotwitt and Donald Pulver were codevelopers, the statement said, without suggesting it was any sort of problem.
NEWS
June 26, 2013 | By Jia Lynn Yang, Washington Post
HONG KONG - Edward Snowden's surprising exit from this city was prompted by a mysterious messenger who relayed to the former contractor that he should leave Hong Kong - and that if he tried to go, he would not be stopped, one of his lawyers said Monday. Unsure whether to trust this person but aware that his options were dwindling, Snowden decided to go for it, said the lawyer, Albert Ho. On Sunday morning, the 30-year-old American, who leaked top-secret U.S. documents, went to the airport with another of his lawyers, used his own passport, and boarded an Aeroflot flight to Moscow without special assistance, according to Ho, all while plainclothes police officers hovered around him. The circumstances of Snowden's departure from Hong Kong have baffled lawmakers and legal experts here who expected a drawn-out battle in the courts of this semiautonomous region.
NEWS
April 6, 2012 | By Mark Scolforo, Associated Press
BELLEFONTE - Former Pennsylvania State University assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky's lawyer said after a short pretrial hearing Thursday that he expected the presiding judge to soon dismiss defense motions to have the child sexual abuse charges thrown out, but he hoped he would allow them to be refiled after more evidence is disclosed by prosecutors. During a 20-minute hearing attended by the retired defensive coordinator and his wife, Sandusky defense attorney Joe Amendola withdrew his attempt to prevent the Attorney General's Office from using at trial secretly recorded conversations between Sandusky and two of the 10 boys he is accused of sexually abusing.
NEWS
October 20, 1991 | By Daniel Rubin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Leonard J. Schwartz, 92, an attorney for 70 years with the law firm of Fox, Rothschild, O'Brien & Frankel, died Friday at his Rittenhouse Square home. Mr. Schwartz was born in Russia and immigrated to the United States at age 7. He went on to help develop the state's worker-compensation law. He attended South Philadelphia High School and was elected president of the Class of 1919. He enrolled at the University of Pennsylvania with the intention of becoming an engineer. While in school, his interests shifted toward law and he transferred to Temple University, where he earned his law degree.
NEWS
May 21, 1986 | By JIM NICHOLSON, Daily News Staff Writer
Herman J. Obert, an attorney for nearly 50 years, died Monday. He was 75 and lived in Bryn Mawr. A Philadelphia lawyer who specialized in probate, charitable trusts and construction, he was a member of the firm of Monteverde, Hemphill, Maschmeyer & Obert. He previously had been a member in the firm of Gibbons, Eustace & Obert. He was active in the Catholic Charities organization and represented a number of orders and societies. The son of a Roxborough brewer, Obert was educated at Georgetown Preparatory School and was a graduate of Georgetown University and Temple University Law School.
NEWS
June 2, 2011 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Arthur Montano, 87, whom the New Jersey Commission on Professionalism in the Law named its 1997 lawyer of the year, died of lung cancer Monday, May 23, at his home in Punta Gorda, Fla. Mr. Montano moved to Florida from Haddonfield in 2000. Mr. Montano, a native of Audubon, Camden County, was president of the Class of 1939 at Audubon High School, where he lettered in football, basketball, and baseball. During World War II, he was a navigator on B-17s and flew bombing missions over Germany in 1945.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 14, 2014 | By Chris Hepp, Inquirer Staff Writer
Visit Philadelphia acted properly two years ago when it discovered that its chief financial officer had misappropriated $210,000, the regional marketing agency's attorney said Friday. The publicly funded agency chose not to alert law enforcement to the misuse of funds, but dealt with the matter internally, allowing the CFO, Joyce Levitt, to resign without criminal charges in exchange for restitution. Levitt went on to work for another publicly funded nonprofit. The fund misuse and how Visit Philadelphia handled the matter are now under the scrutiny of the District Attorney's Office.
NEWS
September 11, 2014 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writer difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
LAWYERS MIGHT HAVE one of the most joked-about jobs on Earth, but here in Philadelphia, they now are among the most celebrated: Temple University yesterday officially opened a national Trial Lawyer Hall of Fame. The hall was founded in 2009 by the Trial Lawyer magazine, but hasn't had a physical home until now. Its goal: to honor trial lawyers "who have left an indelible mark on the American legal tradition through a lifetime of service to the American public, the Constitution and the American trial bar," according to its website.
NEWS
September 5, 2014 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
Confronted by a cousin who accused her of groping her 9-year-old daughter, alleged kidnapper Christina Regusters aborted Wednesday's trial session in an emotional outburst. "I never touched your child!" screamed Regusters, 21, in front of a surprised Philadelphia Common Pleas Court jury. "That's enough!" interjected Judge Jeffrey P. Minehart as Regusters' lawyer and sheriff's deputies tried to calm her. "She's lying," Regusters sobbed as she was led from court. Defense lawyer W. Fred Harrison Jr. told Minehart that he hoped to finish questioning Regusters' cousin by the day's end. But a half-hour later, the judge called it quits.
SPORTS
September 5, 2014 | By Matt Breen, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Quakertown field hockey player withdrew his federal lawsuit Wednesday and decided no longer to challenge a school ruling that bans male players, his lawyer said. Joshua Schwarz and his mother, Steffany, filed a lawsuit in Bucks County last week against the PIAA, the Quakertown School District, and the Quakertown School District Board of Directors. The case was moved to federal court Tuesday at the PIAA's request. On Tuesday evening, Quakertown coach Peach Draper and assistants Melinda Lepko and Jim Maiorino told the team after practice that they were resigning immediately.
NEWS
September 5, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
F. EMMETT Fitzpatrick, one of the most prominent defense lawyers in a city famous for them, felt that the law was more than a profession - it was a mission. "Being a defense attorney was really his mission in life," said his son, F. Emmett Fitzpatrick III, also a lawyer. "The law was to him a vocation, a calling. When anybody came to him with a need, a problem, he saw it as his mission to help that person. " His father, who died Tuesday at age 84, worked both sides of the courtroom.
NEWS
September 4, 2014 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
For Tuckahoe Turf Farms, use of its sprawling fields by soccer teams is simply a no-brainer: It grows turf for recreational venues, so allowing games on the farm is a way to market the product and demonstrate its quality. What difference is there between Tuckahoe's use of its land and farms that operate corn mazes and hay rides to draw customers to buy produce? lawyers for the soccer league and farm ask. Over the last four years, thousands of people have turned out for the games held by the Mid-Atlantic Soccer Showcase League at the sprawling farm in the 400 block of North Myrtle Street - with no harm to the land, the attorneys say. But the Pinelands Commission has ordered all soccer games and practices to cease after Nov. 30, saying they violate preserved land deed restrictions that allow only low-intensity recreation.
NEWS
September 4, 2014 | By Angela Couloumbis and Craig R. McCoy, Inquirer Staff Writers
A veteran lawyer from Montgomery County is the special prosecutor heading the inquiry into whether state Attorney General Kathleen G. Kane's office leaked grand jury information in an effort to discredit her critics, The Inquirer has learned. Thomas E. Carluccio, a criminal defense lawyer in Plymouth Meeting and former prosecutor in Delaware, was appointed over the summer by a Montgomery County judge to explore how secret records became public this year about a 2009 investigation by the Attorney General's Office involving Philadelphia political activist J. Whyatt Mondesire, according to several people familiar with the matter.
NEWS
September 1, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Robert L. Kendall Jr., 83, formerly of Gladwyne, retired partner in the law firm Schnader, Harrison, Segal & Lewis L.L.P., died Wednesday, Aug. 20, of Parkinson's disease at Dunwoody Village. Mr. Kendall practiced law in the Philadelphia office of Schnader, Harrison, Segal & Lewis for 40 years. He served on the firm's executive committee and as founding and managing partner of its Atlanta office. His specialties were federal antitrust cases, cases having to do with government regulation of business, and product liability involving commercial and industrial products and machinery.
NEWS
August 22, 2014 | BY MENSAH M. DEAN, Daily News Staff Writer deanm@phillynews.com, 215-568-8278
LAWYERS FOR the two men awaiting trial for allegedly causing last year's Market Street building collapse that killed six and injured 13 gave notice yesterday that they will seek to sever the case so their clients can be tried separately. If Griffin Campbell and Sean Benschop were tried together, statements Benschop made after the collapse incriminating Campbell could not be properly challenged, Campbell's attorney, William Hobson, said after a brief court hearing. Attorney Daine Grey, who represents Benschop, said he supported the call for separate trials.
NEWS
August 22, 2014 | BY JULIE SHAW, Daily News Staff Writer shawj@phillynews.com, 215-854-2592
NOW IT APPEARS that five of the 10 defendants in the Ironworkers union racketeering-conspiracy case will plead guilty next month. The attorney for Edward Sweeney said yesterday that Sweeney, 55, who was one of Ironworkers Local Union 401's business agents, will plead guilty to some charges at a hearing Sept. 30 in federal court. Attorney Carmen Nasuti III said he met with Sweeney Monday. "We talked about other people pleading guilty, and had another chance to review the case," Nasuti said.
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