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NEWS
September 25, 2003 | By George Anastasia INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's a lot of mozzarella. More than 600 tons, in fact, worth more than $1.5 million wholesale, say its producers. It was delivered from California in a series of shipments in May and June to a local distributor based in Marlton. But that is about all that Valley Gold, the manufacturer, and Joseph Profaci, the recipient, agree on. Lawyers for both sides spent more than two hours in U.S. District Court in Camden yesterday churning the issues in a breach-of-contract/fraud case based on a civil complaint filed last month by Valley Gold.
NEWS
August 21, 2015 | By Angela Couloumbis and Craig R. McCoy, Inquirer Staff Writers
Even as she contends with state criminal charges, Pennsylvania Attorney General Kathleen G. Kane is also facing scrutiny by the FBI, The Inquirer has learned. In recent months, agents have questioned at least three people about several issues, including Kane's role in negotiating a new contract with the union representing narcotics agents in her office, according to people familiar with the matter. The agents sought information about whether Kane suggested to union officials that she would look favorably on their contract if they supported her embattled chief of staff, sources said.
NEWS
June 17, 2015 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
To hear his lawyers tell it, former Fox29 anchor Tom Burlington was fired because he, a white man, dared to use a racial epithet while discussing the word with black coworkers, who sometimes used it themselves. A federal jury disagreed and on Monday rejected the one-time newsman's racial discrimination lawsuit against his former employer. The verdict came after a trial in which the all-white panel was asked to decide who in the newsroom had used "the n-word" before, how many times, and whether there was ever a situation in which a white person could appropriately use it. "I can't believe that in this day and age, he didn't have an idea that using the full n-word in the workplace was outrageous, and it didn't matter the context," Jerome Hoffman, lawyer for Fox29, said in his closing argument to jurors.
NEWS
October 20, 1991 | By Daniel Rubin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Leonard J. Schwartz, 92, an attorney for 70 years with the law firm of Fox, Rothschild, O'Brien & Frankel, died Friday at his Rittenhouse Square home. Mr. Schwartz was born in Russia and immigrated to the United States at age 7. He went on to help develop the state's worker-compensation law. He attended South Philadelphia High School and was elected president of the Class of 1919. He enrolled at the University of Pennsylvania with the intention of becoming an engineer. While in school, his interests shifted toward law and he transferred to Temple University, where he earned his law degree.
NEWS
May 21, 1986 | By JIM NICHOLSON, Daily News Staff Writer
Herman J. Obert, an attorney for nearly 50 years, died Monday. He was 75 and lived in Bryn Mawr. A Philadelphia lawyer who specialized in probate, charitable trusts and construction, he was a member of the firm of Monteverde, Hemphill, Maschmeyer & Obert. He previously had been a member in the firm of Gibbons, Eustace & Obert. He was active in the Catholic Charities organization and represented a number of orders and societies. The son of a Roxborough brewer, Obert was educated at Georgetown Preparatory School and was a graduate of Georgetown University and Temple University Law School.
NEWS
December 25, 1986 | By Robert J. Terry, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Philadelphia lawyer yesterday was charged with assaulting a narcotics police officer after he threw punches at him in a City Hall courtroom and had to be subdued by other officers, police said. The lawyer, Darryl Irwin, 39, was representing a man charged with drug violations and was awaiting a court hearing shortly before noon when the incident occurred. Police said the officer, Jorge Cruz, was standing in a hallway outside the second-floor courtroom, reviewing his file on Irwin's client when the lawyer told him, "There's no need to read that stuff.
NEWS
June 26, 2013 | By Jia Lynn Yang, Washington Post
HONG KONG - Edward Snowden's surprising exit from this city was prompted by a mysterious messenger who relayed to the former contractor that he should leave Hong Kong - and that if he tried to go, he would not be stopped, one of his lawyers said Monday. Unsure whether to trust this person but aware that his options were dwindling, Snowden decided to go for it, said the lawyer, Albert Ho. On Sunday morning, the 30-year-old American, who leaked top-secret U.S. documents, went to the airport with another of his lawyers, used his own passport, and boarded an Aeroflot flight to Moscow without special assistance, according to Ho, all while plainclothes police officers hovered around him. The circumstances of Snowden's departure from Hong Kong have baffled lawmakers and legal experts here who expected a drawn-out battle in the courts of this semiautonomous region.
NEWS
April 6, 2012 | By Mark Scolforo, Associated Press
BELLEFONTE - Former Pennsylvania State University assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky's lawyer said after a short pretrial hearing Thursday that he expected the presiding judge to soon dismiss defense motions to have the child sexual abuse charges thrown out, but he hoped he would allow them to be refiled after more evidence is disclosed by prosecutors. During a 20-minute hearing attended by the retired defensive coordinator and his wife, Sandusky defense attorney Joe Amendola withdrew his attempt to prevent the Attorney General's Office from using at trial secretly recorded conversations between Sandusky and two of the 10 boys he is accused of sexually abusing.
NEWS
May 17, 2001 | By Dominic Sama INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Paul Maloney, 93, of Bryn Mawr, a retired Center City fiduciary lawyer and former president of the Citizens Crime Commission of Philadelphia, died at his home Monday of complications from diabetes. Mr. Maloney practiced for more than 40 years, specializing in administering estates and trusts. He started in 1936 with the Center City law firm of Evans, Bayard & Frick and remained there until the start of World War II, when he entered the Navy. He was assigned to the Navy's Office of the General Counsel in Washington.
NEWS
July 25, 2010 | By Joseph Tanfani and Mark Fazlollah, Inquirer Staff Writers
These days, Pennsylvania Chief Justice Ronald D. Castille says he feels betrayed by his onetime lawyer in the Family Court project. "If I was in the Marine Corps, the guy would be stripped of his rank. He'd be drummed out," Castille said of Jeffrey B. Rotwitt, who was getting paid on both sides of the $200 million deal to build a courthouse at 15th and Arch Streets. But that wasn't the case in April. When Castille was first asked about Rotwitt's codeveloper role, he didn't seem upset with Rotwitt at all. Instead, he was angry at being questioned about it. With an Inquirer writer pushing court officials for an explanation, Rotwitt met with Castille, then e-mailed him a suggested "clear statement of the facts": Yes, Rotwitt and Donald Pulver were codevelopers, the statement said, without suggesting it was any sort of problem.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 27, 2015 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Jonathan Tamari, and Mark Fazlollah, Inquirer Staff Writers
A veritable who's who of Pennsylvania politics could end up taking the stand when U.S. Rep. Chaka Fattah goes on trial next year on federal racketeering conspiracy charges. A list of possible government witnesses filed with the court Tuesday contains such boldface names as U.S. Sen. Robert P. Casey (D., Pa.), former Gov. Ed Rendell, and State Sen. Vincent Hughes (D., Phila.). Also mentioned are behind-the-scenes political players, including Greg Harvey, a veteran Philadelphia election lawyer, and William Sasso, a prominent GOP donor, a confidant of former Gov. Tom Corbett, and chairman of the law firm Stradley Ronon.
NEWS
August 24, 2015 | BY JULIE SHAW, Daily News Staff Writer shawj@phillynews.com, 215-854-2592
A FEDERAL JUDGE yesterday scheduled U.S. Rep. Chaka Fattah's corruption trial for May 2 of next year. That's a week after the April 26 primary, in which Fattah is expected to face at least one challenger. Dan Muroff, an East Mount Airy attorney and leader of the 9th Ward Democratic Committee, intends to run against Fattah. In his order yesterday, U.S. District Judge Harvey Bartle III noted that the trial is expected to last six weeks. Fattah's four co-defendants also face trial that day. Fattah, 58, a Democrat and 11-term congressman who represents parts of Philadelphia and Montgomery County, pleaded not guilty Tuesday before a magistrate to a slew of charges, including bribery, racketeering, conspiracy, money laundering and fraud.
NEWS
August 22, 2015 | By Matt Gelb, Inquirer Staff Writer
Moments after a judge delayed the possible demolition of First African Baptist Church's 109-year-old building, two opposing groups formed around lawyers Thursday outside Courtroom 446 at City Hall. Parishioners of the state's oldest black Baptist church are split over the building at 16th and Christian Streets. Preserve its history, some say. Keep it, others insist, and the church is financially doomed. An elderly woman had one request: "Let us pray," she said. In the middle of the fourth-floor hallway, 19 people - including the lawyers - held hands in a circle.
NEWS
August 21, 2015 | By Angela Couloumbis and Craig R. McCoy, Inquirer Staff Writers
Even as she contends with state criminal charges, Pennsylvania Attorney General Kathleen G. Kane is also facing scrutiny by the FBI, The Inquirer has learned. In recent months, agents have questioned at least three people about several issues, including Kane's role in negotiating a new contract with the union representing narcotics agents in her office, according to people familiar with the matter. The agents sought information about whether Kane suggested to union officials that she would look favorably on their contract if they supported her embattled chief of staff, sources said.
NEWS
August 20, 2015 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
For weeks, U.S. Rep. Chaka Fattah has blasted the federal case against him, calling the charges unfounded and prosecutors' conduct unlawful. As he made his first court appearance Tuesday on racketeering conspiracy charges, the 11-term Democrat hit those points again and again, lest anyone remain uncertain where he stands. "I'd like to say that I'm not guilty," Fattah told U.S. Magistrate Judge Timothy Rice within moments of the judge's taking the bench. Rice, who had barely begun the hearing, responded: "We haven't gotten there yet. I have to follow the rules.
NEWS
August 19, 2015 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
One in an occasional series. At age 17, Monyatta Dunson was just a kid who made a bad decision. She also was an adult who committed an adult crime. That was the determination of Philadelphia Common Pleas Court - and an example of the mind-bending logic that can ensue when the muddle that is adolescence intersects with Pennsylvania's criminal-justice system. So, one day in June, Dunson was brought from the juvenile facility where she was placed, after pleading guilty to simple assault, to Philadelphia's Criminal Justice Center to be sentenced as an adult on related charges.
NEWS
August 16, 2015 | By Matt Gelb, Inquirer Staff Writer
A member of Attorney General Kathleen G. Kane's security detail, charged with illegally spying on others' email, remains on the job despite a policy requiring any staffer charged with a work-related crime to be suspended without pay. Patrick Reese, 48, a Kane confidant and her sometime driver, has pleaded not guilty to a contempt-of-court charge. Prosecutors say that at Kane's behest, he spied on the electronic communications of colleagues and others involved in a grand jury investigation of his boss.
NEWS
August 14, 2015 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
Former Philadelphia Police Officer Christopher Saravello had crimes of his own to pay for Wednesday. But even as he was sentenced to eight years in federal prison for using his position to shake down drug dealers, another recent corruption case loomed over the proceedings. Addressing U.S. District Judge Eduardo Robreno in recent court filings, Saravello's lawyer, Craig Hosay, invoked the case of six members of a Philadelphia police narcotics squad charged last year with beating drug suspects and pocketing seized cash over the years.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 13, 2015 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Howard and Ghent in court Terrence Howard 's attorney says the actor agreed to his 2012 divorce settlement with Michelle Ghent only because he was afraid his ex-wife would leak damning information about his sex life. Brian Kramer seeks to have a Los Angeles court set aside the settlement, claiming it was the product of "heavy-handed acts of extortion and blackmail" on Ghent's part. Speaking during his opening arguments Tuesday, Kramer promised to play the court an audio recording of Ghent making various threats.
NEWS
August 13, 2015 | By Jason Laughlin, Inquirer Staff Writer
HARRISBURG - Three former Pennsylvania State University administrators, accused of ignoring or covering up Jerry Sandusky's sexual attacks, renewed their bid Tuesday to have the criminal case against them dismissed or at least set back significantly. At a hearing in Superior Court, lawyers for former Penn State president Graham B. Spanier and two others urged the three-judge panel to toss the charges or overrule a lower-court decision that for more than two years has snarled the case: whether the university's former top lawyer can become the star witness against its longtime president and his codefendants.
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