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NEWS
September 25, 2003 | By George Anastasia INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's a lot of mozzarella. More than 600 tons, in fact, worth more than $1.5 million wholesale, say its producers. It was delivered from California in a series of shipments in May and June to a local distributor based in Marlton. But that is about all that Valley Gold, the manufacturer, and Joseph Profaci, the recipient, agree on. Lawyers for both sides spent more than two hours in U.S. District Court in Camden yesterday churning the issues in a breach-of-contract/fraud case based on a civil complaint filed last month by Valley Gold.
NEWS
May 23, 2016 | By Kathy Boccella, Staff Writer
As a lawyer, Dennis Weldon has to make sense of tortuous legal papers. But a year ago, the Plumstead Township resident opened a nine-page document that left him flummoxed. It was his child's report card from Gayman Elementary School in the Central Bucks School District. Gone was the traditional A-B-C-D-F report from the teacher. Instead, parents were sent to their computers to click open a nine-page digital document with row after row of learning standards and success indicators for specific reading or math skills.
NEWS
June 5, 2016 | By Samantha Melamed, Staff Writer
Philadelphia is home to more people sentenced as juveniles to life without parole than anyplace else in the world - about 300 inmates, all due a second chance under a U.S. Supreme Court ruling that found automatic life sentences for juveniles to be unconstitutional. On Friday, the first two inmates to be resentenced in Philadelphia struck agreements that will make them immediately eligible for parole. The sentences, of 35 years to life, offer the first glimpses of how Judge Lillian Ransom, who is overseeing the process, and District Attorney Seth Williams intend to handle these cases - and will soon be among the first tests of whether the state parole board will release people convicted of first- or second-degree murder, a question it has not faced in recent memory.
NEWS
March 17, 2016 | By Craig R. McCoy and Angela Couloumbis, STAFF WRITERS
Unlike the five other Democratic politicians charged in the sting corruption case, State Rep. Vanessa Lowery Brown has held fast to saying she was targeted by state prosecutors solely because she is black. The other Democrats eventually struck deals in which they either pleaded guilty or no contest to corruption - and were able to keep their pensions, and were spared possible prison terms. Those still in office had to resign. But in pretrial motions unsealed this week, Brown's lawyers continue to contend she was the victim of racial targeting - and add a new wrinkle.
NEWS
February 26, 2016 | By Michaelle Bond, Staff Writer
A judge declared a mistrial late Wednesday night after jurors said they could not reach a unanimous verdict in the trial of a Chester County lawyer accused of killing his 92-year-old father by withholding medical care. Edward J. O'Brien III, 60, a lawyer from West Whiteland Township, was charged with third-degree murder, aggravated assault, involuntary manslaughter, and reckless endangerment in the 2013 death of his father, Edward J. Jr. Jurors began deliberating Wednesday afternoon and continued for more than eight hours before declaring an impasse.
NEWS
April 29, 2016 | By Angela Couloumbis, Mark Fazlollah, and Craig R. McCoy, STAFF WRITERS
Former Pennsylvania State Treasurer Rob McCord secretly cooperated with federal prosecutors in a corruption investigation while in office and wore a body wire to record conversations with others, the Inquirer has learned. He surreptitiously recorded, among others, a major donor to Pennsylvania politicians whose company made millions helping to invest the public's money, four people familiar with the matter said. McCord, who pleaded guilty to attempted extortion in February 2015 but whose sentence has been delayed for months, wore the wire before he entered his plea.
NEWS
October 20, 1991 | By Daniel Rubin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Leonard J. Schwartz, 92, an attorney for 70 years with the law firm of Fox, Rothschild, O'Brien & Frankel, died Friday at his Rittenhouse Square home. Mr. Schwartz was born in Russia and immigrated to the United States at age 7. He went on to help develop the state's worker-compensation law. He attended South Philadelphia High School and was elected president of the Class of 1919. He enrolled at the University of Pennsylvania with the intention of becoming an engineer. While in school, his interests shifted toward law and he transferred to Temple University, where he earned his law degree.
NEWS
May 21, 1986 | By JIM NICHOLSON, Daily News Staff Writer
Herman J. Obert, an attorney for nearly 50 years, died Monday. He was 75 and lived in Bryn Mawr. A Philadelphia lawyer who specialized in probate, charitable trusts and construction, he was a member of the firm of Monteverde, Hemphill, Maschmeyer & Obert. He previously had been a member in the firm of Gibbons, Eustace & Obert. He was active in the Catholic Charities organization and represented a number of orders and societies. The son of a Roxborough brewer, Obert was educated at Georgetown Preparatory School and was a graduate of Georgetown University and Temple University Law School.
NEWS
December 25, 1986 | By Robert J. Terry, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Philadelphia lawyer yesterday was charged with assaulting a narcotics police officer after he threw punches at him in a City Hall courtroom and had to be subdued by other officers, police said. The lawyer, Darryl Irwin, 39, was representing a man charged with drug violations and was awaiting a court hearing shortly before noon when the incident occurred. Police said the officer, Jorge Cruz, was standing in a hallway outside the second-floor courtroom, reviewing his file on Irwin's client when the lawyer told him, "There's no need to read that stuff.
NEWS
January 11, 2012 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Irving Steven Levy, 54, of Roxborough, a lawyer with White & Williams L.L.P., died of pancreatic cancer Saturday, Jan. 7, at Penn Hospice at Rittenhouse. Mr. Levy joined White & Williams in 1984 and had been a partner since 1990. A litigator, his clients included product and chemical manufacturers, construction companies, pharmaceutical firms, hospitals, and health-care providers. "Steve was an extremely intelligent and gifted trial lawyer who loved to tackle complex issues, particularly complex issues of science, and devise creative ways to explain them to judges and juries," said John Balaguer, managing partner in the White & Williams office in Wilmington.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 17, 2016 | By Chris Mondics, Staff Writer
A $1 million sanction imposed on insurance defense lawyer Nancy Raynor because her witness gave precluded testimony in a medical-malpractice trial has been overturned by a Pennsylvania appellate court. The Superior Court panel found that the instructions of Common Pleas Court Judge Paul Panepinto were vague and left open the possibility that the testimony was permissible. The $1 million sanction, imposed on Raynor after a 2012 trial, caused an uproar in the Philadelphia bar, with many lawyers arguing that the fine was excessive and that it exposed lawyers to punishing sanctions for conduct by witnesses beyond their control.
NEWS
June 16, 2016 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Staff Writer
In their final pitch to the jury, prosecutors in U.S. Rep. Chaka Fattah's federal corruption trial on Tuesday labeled one of the region's longest-serving members of Congress a crook, a liar, and a thief. But as Justice Department lawyer Eric Gibson turned to point an accusatory finger at the congressman, the scene encapsulated impressions that both sides sought to leave with the panel. "The arrogance on display here is astounding," an animated Gibson declared. "In Fattah World, none of the rules that apply to anyone else have any application to the congressman, his family, or his codefendants.
NEWS
June 14, 2016 | By Stu Bykofsky
IN DEATH, Louisville pulled out all the stops for its favorite son, Muhammad Ali. But it took two out-of-towners to rescue and restore the champion's boyhood home - a one-story, pink frame house that had become a broken-down, rat-infested shambles. Then, Louisville didn't care, or so it seemed. But Las Vegas real estate investor Jared Weiss cared, and so did Philadelphia lawyer George Bochetto. When Bochetto - a onetime Pennsylvania state boxing commissioner - heard the home was on the market in 2012, he jumped.
NEWS
June 13, 2016 | By Walter F. Naedele, Staff Writer
Services have been set for Friday, June 24, for George B. Neidig Jr., 69, of Cape May Court House, a former president of the Cape May County Bar Association. Mr. Neidig, a lawyer in Avalon until April, died of cancer Friday, May 6, at home. He was a former municipal court judge in several Shore communities, including Dennis Township and Lower Township. "When George retired on Dec. 31, 2015, he was a judge in Avalon, Middle Township, Woodbine, and Stone Harbor," said Patricia Jordan, his secretary since January 1981.
NEWS
June 12, 2016
REGION
NEWS
June 11, 2016 | By Susan Snyder and Jeremy Roebuck, STAFF WRITERS
A lawyer for a coalition of media outlets on Thursday told a Philadelphia judge that the public deserves to see sealed records on Pennsylvania State University's settlements with Jerry Sandusky's accusers, while the school's lawyers said such a step would unfairly open the victims to ridicule and embarrassment. The battle began after a ruling last month by Common Pleas Court Judge Gary S. Glazer cited sealed records that suggest some accusers who received payments from the university claimed that legendary coach Joe Paterno or his assistants knew about Sandusky's sexual abuse decades before his arrest.
NEWS
June 10, 2016 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Staff Writer
LAWYERS FOR real estate speculator Richard Basciano have asked to move the Sept. 6 civil trial in the deadly Center City building collapse outside Southeastern Pennsylvania, saying local media coverage "has been so extensive, sustained, inflammatory, and inculpatory" that Basciano could not get a fair trial. The 93-page petition to change the venue of the trial was filed Monday with Common Pleas Court Judge Mark I. Bernstein by veteran Philadelphia lawyer Richard A. Sprague. Sprague's firm represents Basciano and several of his corporate entities, property manager Thomas Simmonds, and Frank Cresci, Basciano's ex-chief financial officer.
NEWS
June 10, 2016 | By Laura McCrystal, STAFF WRITER lmccrystal@phillynews.com 610-313-8116 @Lmccrystal
Taking a step they had telegraphed, Bill Cosby's lawyers moved Wednesday to have the sexual assault case against him dismissed because prosecutors failed to present his accuser, Andrea Constand, at his preliminary hearing last month. By relying on detectives to testify and read Constand's 2005 statements to police instead of calling her to the witness stand, prosecutors denied Cosby "an opportunity to confront and cross-examine his accuser," the defense team wrote in a bid to have the charges dropped or receive a new preliminary hearing.
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