CollectionsLawyer
IN THE NEWS

Lawyer

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
September 25, 2003 | By George Anastasia INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's a lot of mozzarella. More than 600 tons, in fact, worth more than $1.5 million wholesale, say its producers. It was delivered from California in a series of shipments in May and June to a local distributor based in Marlton. But that is about all that Valley Gold, the manufacturer, and Joseph Profaci, the recipient, agree on. Lawyers for both sides spent more than two hours in U.S. District Court in Camden yesterday churning the issues in a breach-of-contract/fraud case based on a civil complaint filed last month by Valley Gold.
NEWS
July 25, 2010 | By Joseph Tanfani and Mark Fazlollah, Inquirer Staff Writers
These days, Pennsylvania Chief Justice Ronald D. Castille says he feels betrayed by his onetime lawyer in the Family Court project. "If I was in the Marine Corps, the guy would be stripped of his rank. He'd be drummed out," Castille said of Jeffrey B. Rotwitt, who was getting paid on both sides of the $200 million deal to build a courthouse at 15th and Arch Streets. But that wasn't the case in April. When Castille was first asked about Rotwitt's codeveloper role, he didn't seem upset with Rotwitt at all. Instead, he was angry at being questioned about it. With an Inquirer writer pushing court officials for an explanation, Rotwitt met with Castille, then e-mailed him a suggested "clear statement of the facts": Yes, Rotwitt and Donald Pulver were codevelopers, the statement said, without suggesting it was any sort of problem.
NEWS
June 26, 2013 | By Jia Lynn Yang, Washington Post
HONG KONG - Edward Snowden's surprising exit from this city was prompted by a mysterious messenger who relayed to the former contractor that he should leave Hong Kong - and that if he tried to go, he would not be stopped, one of his lawyers said Monday. Unsure whether to trust this person but aware that his options were dwindling, Snowden decided to go for it, said the lawyer, Albert Ho. On Sunday morning, the 30-year-old American, who leaked top-secret U.S. documents, went to the airport with another of his lawyers, used his own passport, and boarded an Aeroflot flight to Moscow without special assistance, according to Ho, all while plainclothes police officers hovered around him. The circumstances of Snowden's departure from Hong Kong have baffled lawmakers and legal experts here who expected a drawn-out battle in the courts of this semiautonomous region.
NEWS
April 6, 2012 | By Mark Scolforo, Associated Press
BELLEFONTE - Former Pennsylvania State University assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky's lawyer said after a short pretrial hearing Thursday that he expected the presiding judge to soon dismiss defense motions to have the child sexual abuse charges thrown out, but he hoped he would allow them to be refiled after more evidence is disclosed by prosecutors. During a 20-minute hearing attended by the retired defensive coordinator and his wife, Sandusky defense attorney Joe Amendola withdrew his attempt to prevent the Attorney General's Office from using at trial secretly recorded conversations between Sandusky and two of the 10 boys he is accused of sexually abusing.
NEWS
June 16, 2010 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Harold Sills, 97, of Bala Cynwyd, a Philadelphia lawyer and social institution, died of aortic stenosis Sunday, June 13, at home. Mr. Sills maintained a general law practice in Center City for 40 years. Then in 1985, at 72, he became general counsel for ICD, in King of Prussia, a subsidiary of Confab Corp. When Confab was purchased by Tyco Corp. in 1998, Mr. Sills and all senior executives were terminated. Two weeks later, his daughter Judith Sills said, he was called to meet with the new CEO, who acknowledged making an error in judgment and rehired Mr. Sills as general counsel.
NEWS
October 20, 1991 | By Daniel Rubin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Leonard J. Schwartz, 92, an attorney for 70 years with the law firm of Fox, Rothschild, O'Brien & Frankel, died Friday at his Rittenhouse Square home. Mr. Schwartz was born in Russia and immigrated to the United States at age 7. He went on to help develop the state's worker-compensation law. He attended South Philadelphia High School and was elected president of the Class of 1919. He enrolled at the University of Pennsylvania with the intention of becoming an engineer. While in school, his interests shifted toward law and he transferred to Temple University, where he earned his law degree.
NEWS
May 21, 1986 | By JIM NICHOLSON, Daily News Staff Writer
Herman J. Obert, an attorney for nearly 50 years, died Monday. He was 75 and lived in Bryn Mawr. A Philadelphia lawyer who specialized in probate, charitable trusts and construction, he was a member of the firm of Monteverde, Hemphill, Maschmeyer & Obert. He previously had been a member in the firm of Gibbons, Eustace & Obert. He was active in the Catholic Charities organization and represented a number of orders and societies. The son of a Roxborough brewer, Obert was educated at Georgetown Preparatory School and was a graduate of Georgetown University and Temple University Law School.
NEWS
December 25, 1986 | By Robert J. Terry, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Philadelphia lawyer yesterday was charged with assaulting a narcotics police officer after he threw punches at him in a City Hall courtroom and had to be subdued by other officers, police said. The lawyer, Darryl Irwin, 39, was representing a man charged with drug violations and was awaiting a court hearing shortly before noon when the incident occurred. Police said the officer, Jorge Cruz, was standing in a hallway outside the second-floor courtroom, reviewing his file on Irwin's client when the lawyer told him, "There's no need to read that stuff.
NEWS
May 17, 2001 | By Dominic Sama INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Paul Maloney, 93, of Bryn Mawr, a retired Center City fiduciary lawyer and former president of the Citizens Crime Commission of Philadelphia, died at his home Monday of complications from diabetes. Mr. Maloney practiced for more than 40 years, specializing in administering estates and trusts. He started in 1936 with the Center City law firm of Evans, Bayard & Frick and remained there until the start of World War II, when he entered the Navy. He was assigned to the Navy's Office of the General Counsel in Washington.
NEWS
June 2, 2011 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Arthur Montano, 87, whom the New Jersey Commission on Professionalism in the Law named its 1997 lawyer of the year, died of lung cancer Monday, May 23, at his home in Punta Gorda, Fla. Mr. Montano moved to Florida from Haddonfield in 2000. Mr. Montano, a native of Audubon, Camden County, was president of the Class of 1939 at Audubon High School, where he lettered in football, basketball, and baseball. During World War II, he was a navigator on B-17s and flew bombing missions over Germany in 1945.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
February 20, 2015 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Pennsylvania appellate court has temporarily halted imposition of nearly $1 million in penalties against defense lawyer Nancy Raynor, who was sanctioned last year for breaching a court order barring her witnesses from testifying that a woman suing for medical malpractice had been a longtime smoker. The Superior Court order, issued Wednesday, gave Raynor access to business accounts that had been frozen and halted garnishment of fees from insurance-industry clients. It also ordered Philadelphia Common Pleas Court Judge Paul Panepinto to hold a hearing on new evidence that Raynor's lawyers contend shows she took steps to ensure witnesses not offer precluded testimony.
NEWS
February 19, 2015 | Mensah M. Dean, Daily News Staff Writer
THE REV. Keith Goodman, who on Sunday announced his bid for mayor despite concerns about his eligibility to run, doesn't have a prayer of getting on the ballot, according to a lawyer who practices election law. Goodman, 42, the pastor of North Philadelphia Seventh-day Adventist Church, moved back to the city a month ago after living in Chester since 2003. Previously, he lived in Philadelphia from 1999 to 2003. The city's Home Rule Charter states that "the Mayor shall have been a resident of the City for at least three years preceding his election.
SPORTS
February 14, 2015 | By Rich Fisher, For The Inquirer
For years when she was a child, Cozette McAvoy would ask her mom for a pony. One day years later it hit her that, hey, a high-powered corporate lawyer can buy her own horse. Since that revelation, McAvoy has become an owner, trainer and breeder of harness racing horses. She even shoes her own horses. And while many lawyers own horses, it's not as common to find ones who train and shoe them. "I don't really know any other attorneys that do this," said McAvoy, a Coatesville resident who received her undergraduate degree from West Chester, a master's from Lehigh, and law degree from the University of Georgia.
NEWS
February 14, 2015 | By Jason Laughlin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Former Pennsylvania State University administrators awaiting trial on perjury and conspiracy charges related to the Jerry Sandusky sex-abuse scandal are challenging a judge's ruling that the school's former top lawyer can testify against them. Lawyers for Gary Schultz, the school's former vice president, and Tim Curley, the former athletic director, on Thursday filed notices to appeal a Dauphin County judge's decision that Penn State's former chief counsel, Cynthia Baldwin, did not violate attorney-client privilege when she represented the university in front of a grand jury investigating the Sandusky case in 2012.
NEWS
February 11, 2015 | By Angela Couloumbis, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - When a little-known political action committee made a six-figure campaign contribution last spring to then-state Treasurer Rob McCord, few took notice. The PAC, called the Enterprise Fund, donated $125,000 to McCord after his loss in the Democratic gubernatorial primary - when few were paying attention to, or even cared about, the losers. Now, federal investigators who investigated McCord for strong-arming campaign contributions have subpoenaed records from the Treasury Department about the Enterprise Fund.
NEWS
February 11, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
BUDDY CIANFRANI had it in for Wally Phillips. Phillips, a highly regarded crusading prosecutor on the local, state and federal levels whose forte was going after public figures, had his eye on Cianfrani as a special prosecutor in 1974. Henry J. "Buddy" Cianfrani, then a state senator with lots of political pull, scoffed at Phillips' efforts to nail him. He famously boasted, "If he can't get me, what kind of an investigator is he?" Walter M. "Wally" Phillips Jr., who died Saturday at age 76, had been named a special prosecutor by Gov. Milton Shapp to investigate police corruption in Philadelphia and any political figures who got in the way. Phillips called Cianfrani the "Big Cannelloni.
NEWS
February 10, 2015 | BY WILLIAM BENDER, Daily News Staff Writer benderw@phillynews.com, 215-854-5255
YOU MIGHT expect a politician to see a lot of his support evaporate after the Justice Department publicly releases information linking him to multiple criminal acts. Especially when the list includes orchestrating a conspiracy to repay an illegal $1 million loan by routing federal funds and charitable contributions through education nonprofits, securing a $500,000 earmark to thank one of your alleged co-conspirators and using $23,000 in campaign contributions to pay down your son's college debt.
NEWS
February 10, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
WHEN JIM KOLLER was diagnosed with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, he wanted to find out all he could about the disease. He wanted to know, how could he, a fitness buff who thought nothing of a 24-mile bike ride from his home in Lafayette Hill to the Philadelphia Art Museum and back, contract the crippling, fatal disease named after the baseball player Lou Gehrig? How could he, a man who lifted weights and swam six days a week for 20 years, be afflicted with a disease that slowly destroys a person's ability to even flex a muscle?
NEWS
February 9, 2015 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
Crowded with Washington-bound commuters, the Track 5 platform beneath 30th Street Station was swept by a cold wind as Ron Levine stamped his feet and blew into his hands to stay warm. On this unusually icy November day last year, Levine, a prominent white-collar defense lawyer and a former prosecutor in the U.S. Attorney's Office in Philadelphia, and his colleague, Abe Rein, were on their way to the nation's capital. There, they would meet with other lawyers to fine-tune arguments in a Supreme Court case.
BUSINESS
February 7, 2015 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Members of Zion Baptist Church filed suit Thursday against the church officers in the latest salvo of a long battle that has pitted member against member in the North Philadelphia church best known for the legacy of a former pastor, the Rev. Leon Sullivan. The 51-page lawsuit, filed in Common Pleas Court, alleges that the church treasurer, the clerk, and the chairmen of the trustee and deacons boards, along with other board members, have not been good stewards of the church's assets.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|