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NEWS
September 25, 2003 | By George Anastasia INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's a lot of mozzarella. More than 600 tons, in fact, worth more than $1.5 million wholesale, say its producers. It was delivered from California in a series of shipments in May and June to a local distributor based in Marlton. But that is about all that Valley Gold, the manufacturer, and Joseph Profaci, the recipient, agree on. Lawyers for both sides spent more than two hours in U.S. District Court in Camden yesterday churning the issues in a breach-of-contract/fraud case based on a civil complaint filed last month by Valley Gold.
NEWS
June 17, 2015 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
To hear his lawyers tell it, former Fox29 anchor Tom Burlington was fired because he, a white man, dared to use a racial epithet while discussing the word with black coworkers, who sometimes used it themselves. A federal jury disagreed and on Monday rejected the one-time newsman's racial discrimination lawsuit against his former employer. The verdict came after a trial in which the all-white panel was asked to decide who in the newsroom had used "the n-word" before, how many times, and whether there was ever a situation in which a white person could appropriately use it. "I can't believe that in this day and age, he didn't have an idea that using the full n-word in the workplace was outrageous, and it didn't matter the context," Jerome Hoffman, lawyer for Fox29, said in his closing argument to jurors.
NEWS
April 9, 2015 | By Sandy Bauers, For The Inquirer
  More than two weeks after a Wilmington family was sickened after being exposed to a toxic and banned pesticide at a vacation condo in the U.S. Virgin Islands, the father and two teenage sons remain hospitalized. Stephen Esmond, an administrator at the Tatnall School in Wilmington, is conscious but unable to move, and his sons are still in comas, his lawyer has told CNN. In a subsequent news release, the lawyer said Esmond was "improving and stable" and the boys remained in critical condition.
NEWS
October 20, 1991 | By Daniel Rubin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Leonard J. Schwartz, 92, an attorney for 70 years with the law firm of Fox, Rothschild, O'Brien & Frankel, died Friday at his Rittenhouse Square home. Mr. Schwartz was born in Russia and immigrated to the United States at age 7. He went on to help develop the state's worker-compensation law. He attended South Philadelphia High School and was elected president of the Class of 1919. He enrolled at the University of Pennsylvania with the intention of becoming an engineer. While in school, his interests shifted toward law and he transferred to Temple University, where he earned his law degree.
NEWS
May 21, 1986 | By JIM NICHOLSON, Daily News Staff Writer
Herman J. Obert, an attorney for nearly 50 years, died Monday. He was 75 and lived in Bryn Mawr. A Philadelphia lawyer who specialized in probate, charitable trusts and construction, he was a member of the firm of Monteverde, Hemphill, Maschmeyer & Obert. He previously had been a member in the firm of Gibbons, Eustace & Obert. He was active in the Catholic Charities organization and represented a number of orders and societies. The son of a Roxborough brewer, Obert was educated at Georgetown Preparatory School and was a graduate of Georgetown University and Temple University Law School.
NEWS
July 25, 2010 | By Joseph Tanfani and Mark Fazlollah, Inquirer Staff Writers
These days, Pennsylvania Chief Justice Ronald D. Castille says he feels betrayed by his onetime lawyer in the Family Court project. "If I was in the Marine Corps, the guy would be stripped of his rank. He'd be drummed out," Castille said of Jeffrey B. Rotwitt, who was getting paid on both sides of the $200 million deal to build a courthouse at 15th and Arch Streets. But that wasn't the case in April. When Castille was first asked about Rotwitt's codeveloper role, he didn't seem upset with Rotwitt at all. Instead, he was angry at being questioned about it. With an Inquirer writer pushing court officials for an explanation, Rotwitt met with Castille, then e-mailed him a suggested "clear statement of the facts": Yes, Rotwitt and Donald Pulver were codevelopers, the statement said, without suggesting it was any sort of problem.
NEWS
May 20, 2013
BALTIMORE - Benjamin Lipsitz, a lawyer who defended the man who tried to kill George Wallace, died May 10. He was 94. Lipsitz was chosen to defend Arthur Bremer, accused of shooting Wallace, a Democratic presidential candidate, and three others, including a Secret Service agent, at a Laurel, Md., shopping center on May 15, 1972. Bremer called his lawyer "my only friend. " With his daughter, Eleanor J. Lipsitz, as co-counsel, he conducted a strong defense in Prince George's Circuit Court.
NEWS
June 26, 2013 | By Jia Lynn Yang, Washington Post
HONG KONG - Edward Snowden's surprising exit from this city was prompted by a mysterious messenger who relayed to the former contractor that he should leave Hong Kong - and that if he tried to go, he would not be stopped, one of his lawyers said Monday. Unsure whether to trust this person but aware that his options were dwindling, Snowden decided to go for it, said the lawyer, Albert Ho. On Sunday morning, the 30-year-old American, who leaked top-secret U.S. documents, went to the airport with another of his lawyers, used his own passport, and boarded an Aeroflot flight to Moscow without special assistance, according to Ho, all while plainclothes police officers hovered around him. The circumstances of Snowden's departure from Hong Kong have baffled lawmakers and legal experts here who expected a drawn-out battle in the courts of this semiautonomous region.
NEWS
December 25, 1986 | By Robert J. Terry, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Philadelphia lawyer yesterday was charged with assaulting a narcotics police officer after he threw punches at him in a City Hall courtroom and had to be subdued by other officers, police said. The lawyer, Darryl Irwin, 39, was representing a man charged with drug violations and was awaiting a court hearing shortly before noon when the incident occurred. Police said the officer, Jorge Cruz, was standing in a hallway outside the second-floor courtroom, reviewing his file on Irwin's client when the lawyer told him, "There's no need to read that stuff.
NEWS
April 6, 2012 | By Mark Scolforo, Associated Press
BELLEFONTE - Former Pennsylvania State University assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky's lawyer said after a short pretrial hearing Thursday that he expected the presiding judge to soon dismiss defense motions to have the child sexual abuse charges thrown out, but he hoped he would allow them to be refiled after more evidence is disclosed by prosecutors. During a 20-minute hearing attended by the retired defensive coordinator and his wife, Sandusky defense attorney Joe Amendola withdrew his attempt to prevent the Attorney General's Office from using at trial secretly recorded conversations between Sandusky and two of the 10 boys he is accused of sexually abusing.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 24, 2015 | By Helen Ubinas, Daily News Columnist
GOOD NEWS. The Philly teenager I've been writing about since May, the kid trying to avoid a criminal record, has a chance to get his life on the job track instead of the jail track. After more than a year of back and forth in court while the District Attorney's Office denied repeated requests into the accelerated rehabilitation disposition program - ARD - it took less than a minute yesterday for the D.A.'s office to agree to another program that is less intense. If Shawn Yarbrough completes the requirements of an accelerated misdemeanor program - AMP - which includes 40 hours of community service, anger-management classes and court costs, he may keep himself from replaying a well-known scenario in this city: Kid gets in trouble, kid has a record, kid's life is ruined.
NEWS
June 19, 2015 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
Lawyers for Dorothy June Brown, a charter school founder scheduled to be retried next month on federal fraud charges, have filed new medical reports that they say bolster their contention that the 77-year-old educator has dementia. Lawyers said in court documents that they are not seeking to delay Brown's retrial, scheduled to begin July 7 with jury selection on June 29. Instead, they have asked the judge to evaluate Brown's mental competency "at every stage at which it is raised" because physicians at the Cleveland Clinic have concluded that Brown has Alzheimer's-type dementia.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 2015 | By Sally Friedman, For The Inquirer
Back in 2006, when my mother died nearly 37 years after my father had, I remember walking away from her grave and saying to myself, "Now you're nobody's daughter. " But I was prepared when she died. Although she was remarkably independent, even youthful, she was almost 98. To try to come to terms with the death of my father, it has taken me not just years, but decades. It was the loss for which I was not prepared, and the one that still hurts. Not constantly. But like the kind of ache that is more a reminder of pain than the pain itself.
NEWS
June 17, 2015 | By Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writer
The lawyer representing the family of Brandon Tate-Brown - the 26-year-old man shot by police late last year - on Monday called for the district attorney to reopen a criminal investigation into the Frankford man's death. Brian Mildenberg said differences between initial police accounts of the incident and an internal report on the shooting made public last week warranted a second look at the case. District Attorney Seth Williams said he did not plan to reopen the investigation. "What happened was tragic, but not criminal," he said in a statement Monday afternoon.
NEWS
June 17, 2015 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
To hear his lawyers tell it, former Fox29 anchor Tom Burlington was fired because he, a white man, dared to use a racial epithet while discussing the word with black coworkers, who sometimes used it themselves. A federal jury disagreed and on Monday rejected the one-time newsman's racial discrimination lawsuit against his former employer. The verdict came after a trial in which the all-white panel was asked to decide who in the newsroom had used "the n-word" before, how many times, and whether there was ever a situation in which a white person could appropriately use it. "I can't believe that in this day and age, he didn't have an idea that using the full n-word in the workplace was outrageous, and it didn't matter the context," Jerome Hoffman, lawyer for Fox29, said in his closing argument to jurors.
NEWS
June 15, 2015 | By Jonathan Tamari, Inquirer Washington Bureau
The trial has not started yet, but lawyers are already baring their fangs in the fight between Sen. Robert Menendez and the federal prosecutors accusing him of accepting bribes. In court filings debating where to hold the New Jersey Democrat's trial, prosecutors accuse Menendez of "seeking special treatment" by asking to move the case from Newark to Washington and trying to avoid his own constituents. "Put simply," federal prosecutors wrote, "the Department of Justice is more confident than Senator Menendez that a New Jersey jury will objectively consider the evidence.
NEWS
June 13, 2015 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
Hatchet chops to the wrist, hammer blows to the fingers, and, if all else failed, menacing promises of visits from "Italian friends" in New York were among the threats deployed by a violent Albanian loan-sharking and gambling operation run out of a Mayfair bar. But as the group's leader, Ylli Gjeli, 49, was sentenced Thursday to 14 years in prison on federal racketeering conspiracy charges, he insisted that he - and not his borrowers - was the true...
SPORTS
June 10, 2015 | By Marc Narducci, Inquirer Staff Writer
Temple football players Haason Reddick and Dion Dawkins, who face trial on felony aggravated assault and conspiracy charges in connection with an off-campus fight at a North Philadelphia nightclub, will not face any sanctions from the university, according to their attorney. "There was a hearing [Monday] and the Temple Student Conduct Board found that Dion and Hasson were not responsible for the allegations lodged against them," James Funt said. "They are free to go to school and class and engage in football activities.
NEWS
June 10, 2015 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
Two cousins charged in the kidnapping and torture of a Jewelers Row shop employee were ordered held without bail Monday. But lawyers for Basil Buie, 26, and Salahudin Shaheed, 35, characterized the case against their clients as "thin" and based primarily on testimony from Khayree Gay, 31, a third codefendant with a "motive to lie. " "At this point, we have one source connecting my client to this crime, and it's a complicated source: Mr. Gay," Coley...
NEWS
June 7, 2015 | By Angela Couloumbis and Craig R. McCoy, Inquirer Staff Writers
HARRISBURG - A judge on Friday rejected a request that he dismiss bribery and other charges against State Rep. Louise Williams Bishop in the sting investigation after her lawyer argued that the case was too old and Bishop's memory too weak. Dauphin County Court Judge Scott Evans also turned down Bishop's bid to have any potential trial held in Philadelphia, saying he did not have the authority to make that decision. Evans did not rule on Bishop's contention that prosecutors in the sting operation selected their targets based on race and that as a consequence, the entire case should be thrown out. Bishop, 81, is among six current or former Democratic elected officials from Philadelphia who were charged with taking money from a lobbyist who sought political and legislative favors.
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