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NEWS
April 11, 2014 | By Ronnie Polaneczky, Daily News Columnist
IF CHRISTINA SANKEY had been an angel-faced toddler when she went missing, we might know by now how she wound up dead, half-naked and alone, between two parked cars in West Philly on a frigid winter morning. The city would've been galvanized by her death. Government officials would've promised to find out how she met her tragic end. Someone would've created a sidewalk memorial, and others would've led prayer vigils to honor the life that was lost. But Christina, 37, had the mentality of a 2-year-old, but not the physique.
NEWS
September 25, 2003 | By George Anastasia INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's a lot of mozzarella. More than 600 tons, in fact, worth more than $1.5 million wholesale, say its producers. It was delivered from California in a series of shipments in May and June to a local distributor based in Marlton. But that is about all that Valley Gold, the manufacturer, and Joseph Profaci, the recipient, agree on. Lawyers for both sides spent more than two hours in U.S. District Court in Camden yesterday churning the issues in a breach-of-contract/fraud case based on a civil complaint filed last month by Valley Gold.
NEWS
April 13, 2014 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHILADELPHIA It's been 18 months since Philadelphia Common Pleas Court Judge Willis W. Berry Jr. retired on the day he was to pay a $180,000 civil fraud judgment involving a property that a jury found he acquired by deceiving a client. Now, that same ethical violation has cost the 71-year-old Berry his license to practice law for the next year. The state Supreme Court on Wednesday approved without comment the suspension recommended in October by its lawyer Disciplinary Board. The board's report called Berry's violation "serious misconduct" that requires suspension to "protect the public and preserve the integrity of the legal profession.
NEWS
June 26, 2013 | By Jia Lynn Yang, Washington Post
HONG KONG - Edward Snowden's surprising exit from this city was prompted by a mysterious messenger who relayed to the former contractor that he should leave Hong Kong - and that if he tried to go, he would not be stopped, one of his lawyers said Monday. Unsure whether to trust this person but aware that his options were dwindling, Snowden decided to go for it, said the lawyer, Albert Ho. On Sunday morning, the 30-year-old American, who leaked top-secret U.S. documents, went to the airport with another of his lawyers, used his own passport, and boarded an Aeroflot flight to Moscow without special assistance, according to Ho, all while plainclothes police officers hovered around him. The circumstances of Snowden's departure from Hong Kong have baffled lawmakers and legal experts here who expected a drawn-out battle in the courts of this semiautonomous region.
NEWS
April 6, 2012 | By Mark Scolforo, Associated Press
BELLEFONTE - Former Pennsylvania State University assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky's lawyer said after a short pretrial hearing Thursday that he expected the presiding judge to soon dismiss defense motions to have the child sexual abuse charges thrown out, but he hoped he would allow them to be refiled after more evidence is disclosed by prosecutors. During a 20-minute hearing attended by the retired defensive coordinator and his wife, Sandusky defense attorney Joe Amendola withdrew his attempt to prevent the Attorney General's Office from using at trial secretly recorded conversations between Sandusky and two of the 10 boys he is accused of sexually abusing.
NEWS
July 25, 2010 | By Joseph Tanfani and Mark Fazlollah, Inquirer Staff Writers
These days, Pennsylvania Chief Justice Ronald D. Castille says he feels betrayed by his onetime lawyer in the Family Court project. "If I was in the Marine Corps, the guy would be stripped of his rank. He'd be drummed out," Castille said of Jeffrey B. Rotwitt, who was getting paid on both sides of the $200 million deal to build a courthouse at 15th and Arch Streets. But that wasn't the case in April. When Castille was first asked about Rotwitt's codeveloper role, he didn't seem upset with Rotwitt at all. Instead, he was angry at being questioned about it. With an Inquirer writer pushing court officials for an explanation, Rotwitt met with Castille, then e-mailed him a suggested "clear statement of the facts": Yes, Rotwitt and Donald Pulver were codevelopers, the statement said, without suggesting it was any sort of problem.
NEWS
October 20, 1991 | By Daniel Rubin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Leonard J. Schwartz, 92, an attorney for 70 years with the law firm of Fox, Rothschild, O'Brien & Frankel, died Friday at his Rittenhouse Square home. Mr. Schwartz was born in Russia and immigrated to the United States at age 7. He went on to help develop the state's worker-compensation law. He attended South Philadelphia High School and was elected president of the Class of 1919. He enrolled at the University of Pennsylvania with the intention of becoming an engineer. While in school, his interests shifted toward law and he transferred to Temple University, where he earned his law degree.
NEWS
March 6, 2014 | By Melanie Burney, Inquirer Staff Writer
Harvey M. Mitnick, 79, of Voorhees, who practiced law in South Jersey for more than 50 years, died Monday, March 3, of a sarcoma at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York City. He was a trial attorney, practicing primarily in Camden early in his career and later in Haddonfield. He was the senior partner of the firm of Mitnick, Josselson, DePersia & Baker. "He was very good at what he did. He enjoyed a wonderful practice," said retired Superior Court Judge Allan Vogelson, a longtime friend and former law partner.
NEWS
May 21, 1986 | By JIM NICHOLSON, Daily News Staff Writer
Herman J. Obert, an attorney for nearly 50 years, died Monday. He was 75 and lived in Bryn Mawr. A Philadelphia lawyer who specialized in probate, charitable trusts and construction, he was a member of the firm of Monteverde, Hemphill, Maschmeyer & Obert. He previously had been a member in the firm of Gibbons, Eustace & Obert. He was active in the Catholic Charities organization and represented a number of orders and societies. The son of a Roxborough brewer, Obert was educated at Georgetown Preparatory School and was a graduate of Georgetown University and Temple University Law School.
NEWS
December 25, 1986 | By Robert J. Terry, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Philadelphia lawyer yesterday was charged with assaulting a narcotics police officer after he threw punches at him in a City Hall courtroom and had to be subdued by other officers, police said. The lawyer, Darryl Irwin, 39, was representing a man charged with drug violations and was awaiting a court hearing shortly before noon when the incident occurred. Police said the officer, Jorge Cruz, was standing in a hallway outside the second-floor courtroom, reviewing his file on Irwin's client when the lawyer told him, "There's no need to read that stuff.
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NEWS
April 17, 2014 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writervellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
WALLACE STREET was quiet today. An elderly man, sunning himself on his porch, said the block, near 38th Street in Mantua, had been "deserted" since Jamara Stevens, 11, was shot to death inside one of its homes April 5. "A terrible thing, losing a child like that," he said as he sat on his property, across the street from that home. "The only people who know what happened are the ones who were there. "And God, of course. " Which explains why police have issued an arrest warrant for Stevens' mom. Tiffany Goldwire, 31, is wanted for involuntary manslaughter in connection with her daughter's death, Lt. John Stanford, a police spokesman, said.
NEWS
April 13, 2014 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHILADELPHIA It's been 18 months since Philadelphia Common Pleas Court Judge Willis W. Berry Jr. retired on the day he was to pay a $180,000 civil fraud judgment involving a property that a jury found he acquired by deceiving a client. Now, that same ethical violation has cost the 71-year-old Berry his license to practice law for the next year. The state Supreme Court on Wednesday approved without comment the suspension recommended in October by its lawyer Disciplinary Board. The board's report called Berry's violation "serious misconduct" that requires suspension to "protect the public and preserve the integrity of the legal profession.
BUSINESS
April 11, 2014 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
Delaware Attorney General Beau Biden has announced the indictment of suspended lawyer Michael Kwasnik on charges of theft, securities fraud and sale of unregistered securities, the latest in a string of law enforcement and regulatory actions against him. Kwasnik, of Marlton, pleaded guilty to New Jersey money laundering charges a year ago in connection with the theft of $1.1 million from a 96-year-old Cherry Hill widow, whose investment accounts he...
NEWS
April 11, 2014 | BY MENSAH M. DEAN, Daily News Staff Writer deanm@phillynews.com, 215-568-8278
AT LESS than 5 feet tall, Zaria Estes could have been mistaken for a middle-school student in court yesterday. She seemed unsure of the meaning of the word "waive" - as in waiving one's right to a preliminary hearing. But Estes, 15, who was arrested along with two of her friends last month, is the one accused of using a brick to attack a female Temple University student who was walking with her boyfriend on Norris Street near 17th, the District Attorney's Office said. During the March 21 attack, the Temple student was battered with the brick numerous times, causing extensive damage to her face and mouth, authorities said.
NEWS
April 10, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ralph S. Snyder, 91, of Bala Cynwyd, a Philadelphia lawyer, volunteer worker for Jewish charities, and master storyteller, died Monday, April 7, of congestive heart failure at his home. Born and raised in Harrisburg, Mr. Snyder graduated from Pennsylvania State University and, in 1948, the Dickinson Law School. He served as an Army weatherman in Reykjavik, Iceland, during World War II. Mr. Snyder worked in Harrisburg as a deputy attorney general from 1949 to 1963, when he was invited to join the Philadelphia law firm Schnader Harrison Segal & Lewis.
NEWS
April 10, 2014 | By Andrew Seidman and Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
TRENTON - New Jersey's top law enforcement official couldn't say Tuesday how much state taxpayers are paying in legal bills to investigate September's lane closures at the George Washington Bridge. He hasn't received any bills from the law firm retained by Gov. Christie's office. At the same time, legislators are requesting transcripts or other documents from dozens of interviews the firm conducted to formulate a report released this month that absolved Christie and his current staff of any responsibility for the traffic jams.
REAL_ESTATE
April 6, 2014 | By Christine Bahls, For The Inquirer
Upon graduation, 2013 figures show, newly minted lawyers who attended public law schools owed about $76,000, and doctors who attended public medical schools owed about $208,000. Those who attended private schools owed even more. For doctors, the numbers can continue to rise during residencies, some of which last up to six years, if they don't make payments on the interest. So much debt. Yet, when they're looking for mortgages, lenders love them. That's because these young pros - many of whom land in the Philadelphia region because of its prestigious health systems and law firms - have what's called EP.   Earning potential.
NEWS
March 30, 2014 | By Rita Giordano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Call it a vindication or a whitewash, but there's no denying this: They called in a team of high-profile lawyers with Randy Mastro at the head. Mastro, lead lawyer in the team of five former federal prosecutors hired by the Christie administration to investigate the George Washington Bridge lane-closure scandal, is a topflight litigator with New Jersey roots, Philadelphia ties, and a Manhattan address. A former chief of staff and deputy mayor for Rudy Giuliani who waged war on organized crime at New York's Fulton Street Fish Market and the San Gennaro Festival, Mastro, 57, is a partner in Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher, a top firm retained for the investigation and one to which, according to American Lawyer, "blue-chip clients in desperate straits" have turned time and again "to get them out of trouble at every stage.
NEWS
March 26, 2014 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
A divided Pennsylvania Supreme Court has dismissed litigation to reform the way Philadelphia reimburses lawyers appointed to defend indigent clients facing the death penalty. The four-justice majority filed an unsigned per curiam order Friday that did not explain why the jurists, including Chief Justice Ronald D. Castille, decided to end the case. The majority thanked Philadelphia Common Pleas Court Judge Benjamin Lerner for his "exemplary efforts and analysis. " Castille named Lerner in 2011 to study allegations that Philadelphia's pay scale for lawyers appointed to capital cases was so low it violated their clients' constitutional right to effective counsel.
NEWS
March 26, 2014 | BY CHRIS BRENNAN, Daily News Staff Writer brennac@phillynews.com, 215-854-5973
ORI FEIBUSH, the 29-year-old real-estate whiz with a team of candidates hoping to take over the committee posts in South Philly's 36th Ward, ran into trouble yesterday while challenging other people seeking those positions. The legal battle pits Feibush against former City Council President Anna Verna, 82, the Democratic leader of the 36th Ward for nearly four decades. Verna yesterday said it was "quite evident" that Feibush is trying to take over the ward to use it as a base of political power to challenge rookie Councilman Kenyatta Johnson next year.
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