FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
September 25, 2003 | By George Anastasia INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's a lot of mozzarella. More than 600 tons, in fact, worth more than $1.5 million wholesale, say its producers. It was delivered from California in a series of shipments in May and June to a local distributor based in Marlton. But that is about all that Valley Gold, the manufacturer, and Joseph Profaci, the recipient, agree on. Lawyers for both sides spent more than two hours in U.S. District Court in Camden yesterday churning the issues in a breach-of-contract/fraud case based on a civil complaint filed last month by Valley Gold.
NEWS
March 16, 2015 | By Craig R. McCoy, Inquirer Staff Writer
Michael Connors, a worker on the Pennsylvania Turnpike, was pulling his snowplow into a garage when the massive door crashed down on him, gouging his face. As he recovered, Connors sought advice about a lawyer to hire to seek compensation for his injuries. He turned to an acquaintance, Judge Seamus P. McCaffery, who referred him to a Philadelphia law firm, records show. Lawyers ended up winning Connors $425,000. From their share of his winnings, the lawyers paid about $35,000 in referral fees.
NEWS
December 4, 2011 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Marvin Lundy, 80, of Rittenhouse Square, a lawyer who was a benefactor and fund-raiser for numerous charitable, cultural, and educational institutions, died of heart failure Thursday, Dec. 1, at Penn Hospice at Rittenhouse. Mr. Lundy was chairman of Lundy Law in Philadelphia. The firm specializes in personal-injury law, including cases involving automobile accidents, medical malpractice, product liability, construction accidents, and pharmaceutical injuries. It was Mr. Lundy's policy to meet with the firm's new clients, his nephew Leonard Lundy said.
NEWS
June 26, 2013 | By Jia Lynn Yang, Washington Post
HONG KONG - Edward Snowden's surprising exit from this city was prompted by a mysterious messenger who relayed to the former contractor that he should leave Hong Kong - and that if he tried to go, he would not be stopped, one of his lawyers said Monday. Unsure whether to trust this person but aware that his options were dwindling, Snowden decided to go for it, said the lawyer, Albert Ho. On Sunday morning, the 30-year-old American, who leaked top-secret U.S. documents, went to the airport with another of his lawyers, used his own passport, and boarded an Aeroflot flight to Moscow without special assistance, according to Ho, all while plainclothes police officers hovered around him. The circumstances of Snowden's departure from Hong Kong have baffled lawmakers and legal experts here who expected a drawn-out battle in the courts of this semiautonomous region.
NEWS
April 6, 2012 | By Mark Scolforo, Associated Press
BELLEFONTE - Former Pennsylvania State University assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky's lawyer said after a short pretrial hearing Thursday that he expected the presiding judge to soon dismiss defense motions to have the child sexual abuse charges thrown out, but he hoped he would allow them to be refiled after more evidence is disclosed by prosecutors. During a 20-minute hearing attended by the retired defensive coordinator and his wife, Sandusky defense attorney Joe Amendola withdrew his attempt to prevent the Attorney General's Office from using at trial secretly recorded conversations between Sandusky and two of the 10 boys he is accused of sexually abusing.
NEWS
July 25, 2010 | By Joseph Tanfani and Mark Fazlollah, Inquirer Staff Writers
These days, Pennsylvania Chief Justice Ronald D. Castille says he feels betrayed by his onetime lawyer in the Family Court project. "If I was in the Marine Corps, the guy would be stripped of his rank. He'd be drummed out," Castille said of Jeffrey B. Rotwitt, who was getting paid on both sides of the $200 million deal to build a courthouse at 15th and Arch Streets. But that wasn't the case in April. When Castille was first asked about Rotwitt's codeveloper role, he didn't seem upset with Rotwitt at all. Instead, he was angry at being questioned about it. With an Inquirer writer pushing court officials for an explanation, Rotwitt met with Castille, then e-mailed him a suggested "clear statement of the facts": Yes, Rotwitt and Donald Pulver were codevelopers, the statement said, without suggesting it was any sort of problem.
NEWS
February 6, 2015 | By Ellen Gray
* BETTER CALL SAUL. 10 p.m. Sunday, AMC. Moves to 10 p.m. Mondays following night. * THE JINX - THE LIFE AND DEATHS OF ROBERT DURST. 8 p.m. Sunday, HBO.   I HAD MY doubts about the much-anticipated "Better Call Saul. " Spinoffs are always chancy - for every "Frasier," there's at least one "Joey" or "AfterMASH" - and following a show like AMC's "Breaking Bad" only seemed to be asking for trouble. I'm relieved to be wrong. There is a show in Bob Odenkirk's "Breaking Bad" character, a crooked lawyer calling himself Saul Goodman, who, when it all hit the fan in "Bad," predicted a future for himself at a Cinnabon in Omaha.
NEWS
October 20, 1991 | By Daniel Rubin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Leonard J. Schwartz, 92, an attorney for 70 years with the law firm of Fox, Rothschild, O'Brien & Frankel, died Friday at his Rittenhouse Square home. Mr. Schwartz was born in Russia and immigrated to the United States at age 7. He went on to help develop the state's worker-compensation law. He attended South Philadelphia High School and was elected president of the Class of 1919. He enrolled at the University of Pennsylvania with the intention of becoming an engineer. While in school, his interests shifted toward law and he transferred to Temple University, where he earned his law degree.
NEWS
May 21, 1986 | By JIM NICHOLSON, Daily News Staff Writer
Herman J. Obert, an attorney for nearly 50 years, died Monday. He was 75 and lived in Bryn Mawr. A Philadelphia lawyer who specialized in probate, charitable trusts and construction, he was a member of the firm of Monteverde, Hemphill, Maschmeyer & Obert. He previously had been a member in the firm of Gibbons, Eustace & Obert. He was active in the Catholic Charities organization and represented a number of orders and societies. The son of a Roxborough brewer, Obert was educated at Georgetown Preparatory School and was a graduate of Georgetown University and Temple University Law School.
NEWS
March 16, 2015 | BY LARA WITT, Daily News Staff Writer wittl@phillynews.com, 215-854-5927
TAMMY Sadler-Chase was sick and uninsured. She had lost her mobility and her sight after being diagnosed with a rare blood disorder. Her hospital bills had reached nearly $200,000. And every time she applied for insurance, she was denied. Desperate for help, Sadler-Chase called the PHMC Rising Sun Health Center in Olney, where she was connected to a lawyer named Lydia Gottesfeld, who helped her secure proper care and health-care coverage. Sadler-Chase is one of more than 400 patients who are utilizing Rising Sun Health Center, which this month officially began offering on-site financial and legal services to its clients, making it the first of its kind in the nation.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 19, 2015 | Chris Hepp, Inquirer Staff Writer
City Councilwoman Jannie L. Blackwell and City Commissioner Stephanie Singer were among 12 Philadelphia candidates whose nomination petitions were challenged Tuesday in Common Pleas Court. The challenge against Singer, a Democrat, contends that she did not have enough valid signatures on her petitions. Singer said she gathered about 1,480 signatures and was certain she had more than the required 1,000 valid signatures to be placed on the primary ballot. "When they can't beat you at the ballot box," she said, "they try to beat at the courthouse.
NEWS
March 16, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
Former state Supreme Court Justice Seamus McCaffery's resignation last fall answered the most immediate threat to the credibility of the judiciary. But a closer look at the legal fees that helped precipitate his downfall underscores how much the court overlooked in its haste to expel the judge. Besides distributing pornographic e-mails and allegedly intervening in a traffic case, McCaffery drew scrutiny for referral fees that law firms paid to his wife, Lise Rapaport, who was also his top aide.
NEWS
March 16, 2015 | BY LARA WITT, Daily News Staff Writer wittl@phillynews.com, 215-854-5927
TAMMY Sadler-Chase was sick and uninsured. She had lost her mobility and her sight after being diagnosed with a rare blood disorder. Her hospital bills had reached nearly $200,000. And every time she applied for insurance, she was denied. Desperate for help, Sadler-Chase called the PHMC Rising Sun Health Center in Olney, where she was connected to a lawyer named Lydia Gottesfeld, who helped her secure proper care and health-care coverage. Sadler-Chase is one of more than 400 patients who are utilizing Rising Sun Health Center, which this month officially began offering on-site financial and legal services to its clients, making it the first of its kind in the nation.
NEWS
March 16, 2015 | By Craig R. McCoy, Inquirer Staff Writer
Michael Connors, a worker on the Pennsylvania Turnpike, was pulling his snowplow into a garage when the massive door crashed down on him, gouging his face. As he recovered, Connors sought advice about a lawyer to hire to seek compensation for his injuries. He turned to an acquaintance, Judge Seamus P. McCaffery, who referred him to a Philadelphia law firm, records show. Lawyers ended up winning Connors $425,000. From their share of his winnings, the lawyers paid about $35,000 in referral fees.
NEWS
March 15, 2015 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
A South Philadelphia man accused of conning an octogenarian World War II veteran out of his home, personal property, and two vintage cars was found guilty of fraud Friday and sentenced to 71/4 to 141/2 years in prison. The Common Pleas Court jury deliberated about four hours before finding Melvin McIlwaine, 61, guilty of seven counts involving fraud and theft in a yearlong con in which he befriended Ray White, cheated him out of everything, and left him homeless. White, now 90, arrived too late for sentencing, but said he hoped "more people will not be scammed as a result of this particular trial.
NEWS
March 14, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
E. Brooks Keffer Jr., 85, of Wayne, a Philadelphia lawyer and Tredyffrin Township supervisor and zoning board official, died Friday, March 6, of heart disease at Dunwoody Village. Mr. Keffer joined the law firm of Norris, Lex, Hart & Ross in Philadelphia, which became Hepburn Willcox Hamilton & Putnam. He worked there for 45 years, many of them as managing partner. His specialties were corporate law and trusts and estates. When the NFL was based in Narberth, he was one of its lawyers.
NEWS
March 12, 2015
ISSUE | FORFEITURE Stacked deck District Attorney Seth Williams' plea to save civil forfeiture laws fails to note the real threats to every Philadelphian ("City must keep forfeiture laws," March 1). No one should have his home or hard-earned cash forfeited to the government when he hasn't been convicted or even charged with a crime. Yet Philadelphia leads the pack among large cities gobbling up private property. Students in the Penn Law Clinic regularly represent honest, law-abiding grandparents whose homes are seized for alleged low-level drug offenses by their grandsons.
BUSINESS
March 6, 2015 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
A witness testifying Wednesday for defense lawyer Nancy Raynor - hit with nearly $1 million in court-imposed sanctions last Oct. 31 because one of her experts offered banned testimony in a medical-malpractice trial - said Raynor had taken steps to ensure that the information was not heard by the jury. The witness, a trial technician who had been working for the defense team, said he heard Raynor tell the expert witness, Dr. John Kelly, that Philadelphia Common Pleas Court Judge Paul Panepinto had banned any mention that a woman at the center of the trial was a smoker.
NEWS
March 5, 2015 | BY STEPHANIE FARR, Daily News Staff Writer farrs@phillynews.com, 215-854-4225
THE ONE PERSON who loved 17-year-old Tremaine Rogers more than anyone else didn't show up at the trial for the men accused of his murder yesterday. That's because Aaron Rogers, Tremaine's best friend and brother, met the same fate as his sibling did in 2013 when he was shot to death earlier this year. The Daily News profiled Tremaine in a cover story in 2013 about the local men whose killings were largely ignored in the wake of the not-guilty verdict in the Trayvon Martin case.
NEWS
March 5, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Edward Lawrence "Larry" Hannaway, 70, of Haverford, a lawyer in Philadelphia for more than three decades, died Tuesday, Feb. 24, of complications from prostate cancer at the Quadrangle in Haverford. Born in Manchester, N.H., he earned a bachelor of science degree from Villanova University in 1966. Mr. Hannaway was awarded a law degree with honor from George Washington University Law School in 1971. He stayed on as a lecturer at George Washington and earned his master's degree in the areas of law and psychiatry in 1974.
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