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NEWS
September 25, 2003 | By George Anastasia INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's a lot of mozzarella. More than 600 tons, in fact, worth more than $1.5 million wholesale, say its producers. It was delivered from California in a series of shipments in May and June to a local distributor based in Marlton. But that is about all that Valley Gold, the manufacturer, and Joseph Profaci, the recipient, agree on. Lawyers for both sides spent more than two hours in U.S. District Court in Camden yesterday churning the issues in a breach-of-contract/fraud case based on a civil complaint filed last month by Valley Gold.
NEWS
July 13, 2014 | By Suzette Parmley and Amy S. Rosenberg, Inquirer Staff Writers
ATLANTIC CITY - The list of casinos closing or expected to close here just keeps growing. Trump Plaza Hotel & Casino will shut its doors for good in mid-September, according to state officials who were briefed Friday by lawyers for the casino. "I believe Sept. 16 is the targeted closure date that we were told," said Assemblyman Vince Mazzeo (D., Atlantic). Mazzeo said he and State Sen. Jim Whelan (D., Atlantic) received a phone call late Friday afternoon from a Trump Plaza lawyer. Atlantic County officials also were briefed, he said.
NEWS
August 22, 2014 | BY JULIE SHAW, Daily News Staff Writer shawj@phillynews.com, 215-854-2592
NOW IT APPEARS that five of the 10 defendants in the Ironworkers union racketeering-conspiracy case will plead guilty next month. The attorney for Edward Sweeney said yesterday that Sweeney, 55, who was one of Ironworkers Local Union 401's business agents, will plead guilty to some charges at a hearing Sept. 30 in federal court. Attorney Carmen Nasuti III said he met with Sweeney Monday. "We talked about other people pleading guilty, and had another chance to review the case," Nasuti said.
NEWS
May 18, 2014 | By Carolyn Davis, Inquirer Staff Writer
The judge strongly urged the defendant in a capital murder case not to do it. His lawyers did the same. But in the end, Raghunandan Yandamuri took his own counsel - and became his own counsel. After a two-hour hearing in Norristown, a Montgomery County Court judge on Friday granted Yandamuri's request to drop his court-appointed lawyer and represent himself at trial this summer. Yandamuri, a citizen of India in the United States on a work visa, faces murder and other charges in the October 2012 deaths of 10-month-old Saanvi Venna and her grandmother Satyavathi Venna, 61, at the Marquis Apartments in King of Prussia.
NEWS
June 26, 2013 | By Jia Lynn Yang, Washington Post
HONG KONG - Edward Snowden's surprising exit from this city was prompted by a mysterious messenger who relayed to the former contractor that he should leave Hong Kong - and that if he tried to go, he would not be stopped, one of his lawyers said Monday. Unsure whether to trust this person but aware that his options were dwindling, Snowden decided to go for it, said the lawyer, Albert Ho. On Sunday morning, the 30-year-old American, who leaked top-secret U.S. documents, went to the airport with another of his lawyers, used his own passport, and boarded an Aeroflot flight to Moscow without special assistance, according to Ho, all while plainclothes police officers hovered around him. The circumstances of Snowden's departure from Hong Kong have baffled lawmakers and legal experts here who expected a drawn-out battle in the courts of this semiautonomous region.
NEWS
April 6, 2012 | By Mark Scolforo, Associated Press
BELLEFONTE - Former Pennsylvania State University assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky's lawyer said after a short pretrial hearing Thursday that he expected the presiding judge to soon dismiss defense motions to have the child sexual abuse charges thrown out, but he hoped he would allow them to be refiled after more evidence is disclosed by prosecutors. During a 20-minute hearing attended by the retired defensive coordinator and his wife, Sandusky defense attorney Joe Amendola withdrew his attempt to prevent the Attorney General's Office from using at trial secretly recorded conversations between Sandusky and two of the 10 boys he is accused of sexually abusing.
NEWS
July 25, 2010 | By Joseph Tanfani and Mark Fazlollah, Inquirer Staff Writers
These days, Pennsylvania Chief Justice Ronald D. Castille says he feels betrayed by his onetime lawyer in the Family Court project. "If I was in the Marine Corps, the guy would be stripped of his rank. He'd be drummed out," Castille said of Jeffrey B. Rotwitt, who was getting paid on both sides of the $200 million deal to build a courthouse at 15th and Arch Streets. But that wasn't the case in April. When Castille was first asked about Rotwitt's codeveloper role, he didn't seem upset with Rotwitt at all. Instead, he was angry at being questioned about it. With an Inquirer writer pushing court officials for an explanation, Rotwitt met with Castille, then e-mailed him a suggested "clear statement of the facts": Yes, Rotwitt and Donald Pulver were codevelopers, the statement said, without suggesting it was any sort of problem.
NEWS
March 9, 2014 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
A warning to people who post comments online: Anonymous is not forever. A Philadelphia judge has ordered the owners of Philly.com - who also own The Inquirer and the Philadelphia Daily News - to disclose the identity of a person who posted a comment online. The ruling came in a defamation suit filed by John J. Dougherty, the powerful head of Local 98 of the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers. In October 2012, Dougherty sued over a comment posted two months earlier on a Daily News blog that described a public feud involving Dougherty.
NEWS
October 20, 1991 | By Daniel Rubin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Leonard J. Schwartz, 92, an attorney for 70 years with the law firm of Fox, Rothschild, O'Brien & Frankel, died Friday at his Rittenhouse Square home. Mr. Schwartz was born in Russia and immigrated to the United States at age 7. He went on to help develop the state's worker-compensation law. He attended South Philadelphia High School and was elected president of the Class of 1919. He enrolled at the University of Pennsylvania with the intention of becoming an engineer. While in school, his interests shifted toward law and he transferred to Temple University, where he earned his law degree.
NEWS
May 21, 1986 | By JIM NICHOLSON, Daily News Staff Writer
Herman J. Obert, an attorney for nearly 50 years, died Monday. He was 75 and lived in Bryn Mawr. A Philadelphia lawyer who specialized in probate, charitable trusts and construction, he was a member of the firm of Monteverde, Hemphill, Maschmeyer & Obert. He previously had been a member in the firm of Gibbons, Eustace & Obert. He was active in the Catholic Charities organization and represented a number of orders and societies. The son of a Roxborough brewer, Obert was educated at Georgetown Preparatory School and was a graduate of Georgetown University and Temple University Law School.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 31, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Robert L. Kendall Jr., 83, formerly of Gladwyne, retired partner in the law firm Schnader, Harrison, Segal & Lewis L.L.P., died Wednesday, Aug. 20, of Parkinson's disease at Dunwoody Village. Mr. Kendall practiced law in the Philadelphia office of Schnader, Harrison, Segal & Lewis for 40 years. He served on the firm's executive committee and as founding and managing partner of its Atlanta office. His specialties were federal antitrust cases, cases having to do with government regulation of business, and product liability involving commercial and industrial products and machinery.
NEWS
August 22, 2014 | BY MENSAH M. DEAN, Daily News Staff Writer deanm@phillynews.com, 215-568-8278
LAWYERS FOR the two men awaiting trial for allegedly causing last year's Market Street building collapse that killed six and injured 13 gave notice yesterday that they will seek to sever the case so their clients can be tried separately. If Griffin Campbell and Sean Benschop were tried together, statements Benschop made after the collapse incriminating Campbell could not be properly challenged, Campbell's attorney, William Hobson, said after a brief court hearing. Attorney Daine Grey, who represents Benschop, said he supported the call for separate trials.
NEWS
August 22, 2014 | BY JULIE SHAW, Daily News Staff Writer shawj@phillynews.com, 215-854-2592
NOW IT APPEARS that five of the 10 defendants in the Ironworkers union racketeering-conspiracy case will plead guilty next month. The attorney for Edward Sweeney said yesterday that Sweeney, 55, who was one of Ironworkers Local Union 401's business agents, will plead guilty to some charges at a hearing Sept. 30 in federal court. Attorney Carmen Nasuti III said he met with Sweeney Monday. "We talked about other people pleading guilty, and had another chance to review the case," Nasuti said.
NEWS
August 22, 2014 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
History should decide, not the courts, whether Chris Goldstein and Don DeZarn - two New Jerseyans who each lit up a hand-rolled marijuana cigarette during a protest at Independence National Historical Park last year - belong in the same pantheon as Mohandas K. Gandhi, the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Harvey Milk, and Allen Ginsberg, a federal judge said in a caustic written opinion issued this week. In her 10-page ruling, U.S. District Judge Cynthia M. Rufe in Philadelphia rejected appeals filed by Goldstein, 38, of Willingboro, and DeZarn, 48, of East Windsor, who argued that identical two-year probationary terms and $3,000 fines imposed by a lower court were harsh and that they should not have been ordered to stay away from future marijuana protests at the park, which Goldstein had organized.
NEWS
August 21, 2014 | BY MENSAH M. DEAN, Daily News Staff Writer deanm@phillynews.com, 215-568-8278
JASON "WOLF" PARKER, a Philadelphia man arrested this spring for allegedly impersonating a lawyer, was convicted yesterday of contempt of court for defying a judge's order to stay out of the city's Criminal Justice Center. Before being led from the courtroom by a deputy sheriff, Parker - sounding like a lawyer - told Common Pleas Judge Rayford Means that he objected and would be appealing. Though the contempt conviction is only a misdemeanor punishable by just under six months in jail, Parker's legal troubles are far from over.
NEWS
August 20, 2014 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
TRENTON - The New Jersey Senate on Monday confirmed the nomination of a Haddon Heights lawyer and ally of South Jersey Democrats to Rutgers University's main governing body. William M. Tambussi's appointment to the board of governors was part of the Democratic-controlled Senate's unanimous approval of a package of Gov. Christie's nominees for various state positions. Tambussi, 56, replaces former Assembly Speaker Joseph J. Roberts Jr., also of Camden County. A higher-education restructuring act that passed in 2012 requires one of the governor's eight appointees to the 15-member board to be a Camden County resident.
NEWS
August 20, 2014 | BY MENSAH M. DEAN, Daily News Staff Writer deanm@phillynews.com, 215-568-8278
PHILLY-BORN rapper Meek Mill, aided by three lawyers and a courtroom full of supporters, yesterday failed to persuade a judge to release him from jail early. That means the summertime blues will continue for the "Amen" rapper, who was sentenced July 11 to serve three to six months in jail for violating terms of his probation, which stems from a 2008 drug-and-gun conviction. Not only did Common Pleas Judge Genece Brinkley reject every argument proffered on behalf of the rapper born Robert Williams, she and his lead attorney got into a testy exchange over the lawyer's belief that the judge was being disrespectful and rushing him along so that she could officiate at a wedding.
NEWS
August 20, 2014 | By Craig R. McCoy, Inquirer Staff Writer
HARRISBURG - Lawyers for six defendants charged with corruption in connection with Pennsylvania Turnpike contracts ripped into the state prosecution Monday in a last-ditch attempt to shut down or seriously weaken the case before a forthcoming trial. The lawyers said the indictment unfairly sought to criminalize the legal practice of dunning government contractors for campaign contributions. And the Pennsylvania Attorney General's Office, the defense lawyers said, had fallen far short in amassing evidence tying gifts and campaign money to specific contracts.
NEWS
August 20, 2014 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
For the McIntyre brothers of North Philadelphia, pimping was a family affair - a profession that landed one in federal prison Monday and threatens to send the other to join him soon. A federal judge sentenced younger brother Rahim, an aspiring 35-year-old rapper who went by the street name "King Kobra," to 21 years and 10 months behind bars on Monday after a conviction on three counts of sex trafficking. Younger brother Rashaad, who adopted "Sincere" as his moniker, pleaded guilty to trafficking charges of his own and an additional count of producing child pornography.
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