FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
September 25, 2003 | By George Anastasia INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's a lot of mozzarella. More than 600 tons, in fact, worth more than $1.5 million wholesale, say its producers. It was delivered from California in a series of shipments in May and June to a local distributor based in Marlton. But that is about all that Valley Gold, the manufacturer, and Joseph Profaci, the recipient, agree on. Lawyers for both sides spent more than two hours in U.S. District Court in Camden yesterday churning the issues in a breach-of-contract/fraud case based on a civil complaint filed last month by Valley Gold.
NEWS
April 9, 2015 | By Sandy Bauers, For The Inquirer
  More than two weeks after a Wilmington family was sickened after being exposed to a toxic and banned pesticide at a vacation condo in the U.S. Virgin Islands, the father and two teenage sons remain hospitalized. Stephen Esmond, an administrator at the Tatnall School in Wilmington, is conscious but unable to move, and his sons are still in comas, his lawyer has told CNN. In a subsequent news release, the lawyer said Esmond was "improving and stable" and the boys remained in critical condition.
NEWS
October 20, 1991 | By Daniel Rubin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Leonard J. Schwartz, 92, an attorney for 70 years with the law firm of Fox, Rothschild, O'Brien & Frankel, died Friday at his Rittenhouse Square home. Mr. Schwartz was born in Russia and immigrated to the United States at age 7. He went on to help develop the state's worker-compensation law. He attended South Philadelphia High School and was elected president of the Class of 1919. He enrolled at the University of Pennsylvania with the intention of becoming an engineer. While in school, his interests shifted toward law and he transferred to Temple University, where he earned his law degree.
NEWS
May 21, 1986 | By JIM NICHOLSON, Daily News Staff Writer
Herman J. Obert, an attorney for nearly 50 years, died Monday. He was 75 and lived in Bryn Mawr. A Philadelphia lawyer who specialized in probate, charitable trusts and construction, he was a member of the firm of Monteverde, Hemphill, Maschmeyer & Obert. He previously had been a member in the firm of Gibbons, Eustace & Obert. He was active in the Catholic Charities organization and represented a number of orders and societies. The son of a Roxborough brewer, Obert was educated at Georgetown Preparatory School and was a graduate of Georgetown University and Temple University Law School.
NEWS
June 26, 2013 | By Jia Lynn Yang, Washington Post
HONG KONG - Edward Snowden's surprising exit from this city was prompted by a mysterious messenger who relayed to the former contractor that he should leave Hong Kong - and that if he tried to go, he would not be stopped, one of his lawyers said Monday. Unsure whether to trust this person but aware that his options were dwindling, Snowden decided to go for it, said the lawyer, Albert Ho. On Sunday morning, the 30-year-old American, who leaked top-secret U.S. documents, went to the airport with another of his lawyers, used his own passport, and boarded an Aeroflot flight to Moscow without special assistance, according to Ho, all while plainclothes police officers hovered around him. The circumstances of Snowden's departure from Hong Kong have baffled lawmakers and legal experts here who expected a drawn-out battle in the courts of this semiautonomous region.
NEWS
April 6, 2012 | By Mark Scolforo, Associated Press
BELLEFONTE - Former Pennsylvania State University assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky's lawyer said after a short pretrial hearing Thursday that he expected the presiding judge to soon dismiss defense motions to have the child sexual abuse charges thrown out, but he hoped he would allow them to be refiled after more evidence is disclosed by prosecutors. During a 20-minute hearing attended by the retired defensive coordinator and his wife, Sandusky defense attorney Joe Amendola withdrew his attempt to prevent the Attorney General's Office from using at trial secretly recorded conversations between Sandusky and two of the 10 boys he is accused of sexually abusing.
NEWS
July 25, 2010 | By Joseph Tanfani and Mark Fazlollah, Inquirer Staff Writers
These days, Pennsylvania Chief Justice Ronald D. Castille says he feels betrayed by his onetime lawyer in the Family Court project. "If I was in the Marine Corps, the guy would be stripped of his rank. He'd be drummed out," Castille said of Jeffrey B. Rotwitt, who was getting paid on both sides of the $200 million deal to build a courthouse at 15th and Arch Streets. But that wasn't the case in April. When Castille was first asked about Rotwitt's codeveloper role, he didn't seem upset with Rotwitt at all. Instead, he was angry at being questioned about it. With an Inquirer writer pushing court officials for an explanation, Rotwitt met with Castille, then e-mailed him a suggested "clear statement of the facts": Yes, Rotwitt and Donald Pulver were codevelopers, the statement said, without suggesting it was any sort of problem.
NEWS
June 16, 2010 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Harold Sills, 97, of Bala Cynwyd, a Philadelphia lawyer and social institution, died of aortic stenosis Sunday, June 13, at home. Mr. Sills maintained a general law practice in Center City for 40 years. Then in 1985, at 72, he became general counsel for ICD, in King of Prussia, a subsidiary of Confab Corp. When Confab was purchased by Tyco Corp. in 1998, Mr. Sills and all senior executives were terminated. Two weeks later, his daughter Judith Sills said, he was called to meet with the new CEO, who acknowledged making an error in judgment and rehired Mr. Sills as general counsel.
NEWS
December 25, 1986 | By Robert J. Terry, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Philadelphia lawyer yesterday was charged with assaulting a narcotics police officer after he threw punches at him in a City Hall courtroom and had to be subdued by other officers, police said. The lawyer, Darryl Irwin, 39, was representing a man charged with drug violations and was awaiting a court hearing shortly before noon when the incident occurred. Police said the officer, Jorge Cruz, was standing in a hallway outside the second-floor courtroom, reviewing his file on Irwin's client when the lawyer told him, "There's no need to read that stuff.
NEWS
May 17, 2001 | By Dominic Sama INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Paul Maloney, 93, of Bryn Mawr, a retired Center City fiduciary lawyer and former president of the Citizens Crime Commission of Philadelphia, died at his home Monday of complications from diabetes. Mr. Maloney practiced for more than 40 years, specializing in administering estates and trusts. He started in 1936 with the Center City law firm of Evans, Bayard & Frick and remained there until the start of World War II, when he entered the Navy. He was assigned to the Navy's Office of the General Counsel in Washington.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 16, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Milton A. Feldman, 84, of Philadelphia, a business lawyer and civic leader, died Monday, May 11, of respiratory failure at Abington Memorial Hospital. Mr. Feldman worked for various firms, focusing on finance, corporate, and real estate law. He joined the Philadelphia firm of Sterling, Magaziner, Stern & Levy as an associate in 1957 and later was of counsel to Clark, Ladner, Fortenbaugh & Young. He retired from Dilworth Paxson L.L.P. in 2006 after 12 years. In one high-profile matter, Mr. Feldman was lead attorney for the unsecured creditors in the Drexel Burnham Lambert Group Inc. bankruptcy case.
NEWS
May 13, 2015 | By Laura McCrystal, Inquirer Staff Writer
Lawyers for Eric Frein, the alleged killer of a Pennsylvania state trooper, have withdrawn, for now, their request to move his death-penalty trial out of Pike County. But defense attorney Michael Weinstein said he would make another attempt later. Another request filed this month still stands. Weinstein asked a judge to order District Attorney Ray Tonkin to stop distributing campaign materials with Frein's name and photo. Tonkin is facing a challenger in the May 19 Republican primary.
NEWS
May 10, 2015 | By Tricia L. Nadolny and Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writers
With 10 days until the primary, real estate agent Allan Domb and education activist Helen Gym have the most cash on hand in the race for at-large City Council seats, campaign-finance reports filed Friday show. In the most competitive Council district, the Second, Councilman Kenyatta Johnson has raised more money than his opponent in the Democratic primary, Ori Feibush, and has more going into the final stretch before May 19. Candidates for Council and mayor on Friday issued campaign finance reports showing how much they raised from Jan. 1 through Monday.
NEWS
May 10, 2015 | By Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writer
The private police contractors driving Hasheem Singletary down Osage Avenue on Wednesday night had traveled with him from Jacksonville, Fla., to West Philadelphia. They had been tasked with bringing Singletary, who this week turned 17, to the city to face charges in three gunpoint robberies. And by all accounts, the journey had gone smoothly - until the contractors were within a block of the police station where he was to be booked. That's when, police say, their charge, still in handcuffs, slipped out a backseat door of their rental car and disappeared down an alleyway.
BUSINESS
May 9, 2015 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
One of the bank bosses accused of lying to investors and regulators says it was a long-standing practice at the former Wilmington Trust Corp. to claim that millions of dollars in "turd loans" to developers were being paid - even when they were not. It wasn't the only bank that collapsed amid the late 2000s financial crisis. Lehman Bros., Wachovia, National City and others were also overwhelmed by bad loans. But Wilmington Trust, the biggest bank still based in the Philadelphia area when regulators forced its discount sale to M&T Bank Corp.
BUSINESS
May 9, 2015 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pennsylvania's Public Utility Commission is getting a new leader to reflect the change of political parties in the governor's mansion, though the commission's composition is unchanged. Democratic Gov. Wolf has named Gladys M. Brown as the PUC's chairwoman, replacing Robert F. Powelson, a Republican from Kennett Square, who had headed the five-member commission since 2011. The changeover occurred cordially at the end of Thursday's PUC meeting, at which Powelson invited Brown to gavel the session to a close.
NEWS
May 8, 2015 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
The federal corruption case against six members of an elite Philadelphia police narcotics squad will head to a jury Thursday, after a second day of closing arguments in which the defense team lauded its clients as heroes and likened the officers' accusers to "a freak show to end all. " Their speeches Wednesday ranged from indignant jeremiads - condemning the FBI for an "unconscionable" investigation - to sentimental paeans extolling the bravery of...
NEWS
May 7, 2015
LIKE A DOG chasing a car, George Bochetto has been chasing Muhammad Ali's Louisville, Ky., birthplace for some time. And now that he has it, he's not precisely sure what he will do with it. Whatever it is, it will be done with dignity. The Center City lawyer and former Pennsylvania boxing commissioner feels it is a shrine, and should be treated as one, but the details are still forming. It's an understatement to say that Bochetto, a onetime boxer himself, is a devotee of the former heavyweight champion, humanitarian and onetime resident of Cherry Hill.
NEWS
May 7, 2015 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
Three years ago, when George Bochetto read in his morning paper that Muhammad Ali's boyhood home was for sale, he put down his coffee and picked up the phone. "I tried to get hold of the Realtor," said Bochetto, a Philadelphia lawyer and former Pennsylvania boxing commissioner. As a lifetime fan of Ali's and an avid collector of his memorabilia, Bochetto was ready to pay the full $70,000 asking price for the small frame house in Louisville, Ky. His offer came too late. The house where the three-time heavyweight champion lived until he was a teenager had already been sold to Jared Weiss, a Las Vegas real estate investor.
NEWS
May 7, 2015 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
Lawyers on both sides of the federal corruption trial of six members of an elite Philadelphia Police Department narcotics squad finally found on Tuesday - the day they began their closing arguments - a point on which they could agree: The decision in this case, they told jurors, should be easy. It would be "absurd," said Assistant U.S. Attorney Maureen McCartney, to believe that a disgraced former police officer and 19 drug suspects independently came up with the same detailed lies about a series of police abuses.
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