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NEWS
September 25, 2003 | By George Anastasia INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's a lot of mozzarella. More than 600 tons, in fact, worth more than $1.5 million wholesale, say its producers. It was delivered from California in a series of shipments in May and June to a local distributor based in Marlton. But that is about all that Valley Gold, the manufacturer, and Joseph Profaci, the recipient, agree on. Lawyers for both sides spent more than two hours in U.S. District Court in Camden yesterday churning the issues in a breach-of-contract/fraud case based on a civil complaint filed last month by Valley Gold.
NEWS
March 5, 2013 | By Craig R. McCoy, Inquirer Staff Writer
To our readers: A draft of this story appeared inadvertently for several hours Sunday on the Philly.com website. Over the last decade, the wife of Pennsylvania Supreme Court Justice Seamus P. McCaffery - his chief judicial aide - has received 18 payments as referral fees for connecting law firms with clients. In the most recent payment, McCaffery's wife, lawyer Lise Rapaport, received $821,000 - her fee from a settlement in a multimillion-dollar medical malpractice case. Court records and McCaffery's state-mandated public financial-disclosure forms list the 18 instances in which his wife received a referral fee. A lawyer for the couple, and attorneys with the firms, say the fees were routine and proper.
NEWS
July 25, 2010 | By Joseph Tanfani and Mark Fazlollah, Inquirer Staff Writers
These days, Pennsylvania Chief Justice Ronald D. Castille says he feels betrayed by his onetime lawyer in the Family Court project. "If I was in the Marine Corps, the guy would be stripped of his rank. He'd be drummed out," Castille said of Jeffrey B. Rotwitt, who was getting paid on both sides of the $200 million deal to build a courthouse at 15th and Arch Streets. But that wasn't the case in April. When Castille was first asked about Rotwitt's codeveloper role, he didn't seem upset with Rotwitt at all. Instead, he was angry at being questioned about it. With an Inquirer writer pushing court officials for an explanation, Rotwitt met with Castille, then e-mailed him a suggested "clear statement of the facts": Yes, Rotwitt and Donald Pulver were codevelopers, the statement said, without suggesting it was any sort of problem.
NEWS
June 26, 2013 | By Jia Lynn Yang, Washington Post
HONG KONG - Edward Snowden's surprising exit from this city was prompted by a mysterious messenger who relayed to the former contractor that he should leave Hong Kong - and that if he tried to go, he would not be stopped, one of his lawyers said Monday. Unsure whether to trust this person but aware that his options were dwindling, Snowden decided to go for it, said the lawyer, Albert Ho. On Sunday morning, the 30-year-old American, who leaked top-secret U.S. documents, went to the airport with another of his lawyers, used his own passport, and boarded an Aeroflot flight to Moscow without special assistance, according to Ho, all while plainclothes police officers hovered around him. The circumstances of Snowden's departure from Hong Kong have baffled lawmakers and legal experts here who expected a drawn-out battle in the courts of this semiautonomous region.
NEWS
April 6, 2012 | By Mark Scolforo, Associated Press
BELLEFONTE - Former Pennsylvania State University assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky's lawyer said after a short pretrial hearing Thursday that he expected the presiding judge to soon dismiss defense motions to have the child sexual abuse charges thrown out, but he hoped he would allow them to be refiled after more evidence is disclosed by prosecutors. During a 20-minute hearing attended by the retired defensive coordinator and his wife, Sandusky defense attorney Joe Amendola withdrew his attempt to prevent the Attorney General's Office from using at trial secretly recorded conversations between Sandusky and two of the 10 boys he is accused of sexually abusing.
NEWS
January 22, 2013 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
ATLANTIC CITY - Enoch L. "Nucky" Johnson, made famous by HBO's acclaimed Boardwalk Empire series, was actually a gentler soul than the gangster seen in the TV show, according to a lawyer who once defended him in a criminal matter. Frank J. Ferry, a Ventnor lawyer, launched the sale of his long-awaited 306-page biography, Nucky, the Real Story of the Atlantic City Boardwalk Boss, at the historic Knife & Fork Inn, one of Johnson's old haunts, on Sunday. Nearly 200 guests packed the book signing as a pianist played tunes from the Prohibition era - when Johnson was the Atlantic County treasurer and an influential Republican Party political boss who picked senators and governors.
NEWS
October 20, 1991 | By Daniel Rubin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Leonard J. Schwartz, 92, an attorney for 70 years with the law firm of Fox, Rothschild, O'Brien & Frankel, died Friday at his Rittenhouse Square home. Mr. Schwartz was born in Russia and immigrated to the United States at age 7. He went on to help develop the state's worker-compensation law. He attended South Philadelphia High School and was elected president of the Class of 1919. He enrolled at the University of Pennsylvania with the intention of becoming an engineer. While in school, his interests shifted toward law and he transferred to Temple University, where he earned his law degree.
NEWS
May 21, 1986 | By JIM NICHOLSON, Daily News Staff Writer
Herman J. Obert, an attorney for nearly 50 years, died Monday. He was 75 and lived in Bryn Mawr. A Philadelphia lawyer who specialized in probate, charitable trusts and construction, he was a member of the firm of Monteverde, Hemphill, Maschmeyer & Obert. He previously had been a member in the firm of Gibbons, Eustace & Obert. He was active in the Catholic Charities organization and represented a number of orders and societies. The son of a Roxborough brewer, Obert was educated at Georgetown Preparatory School and was a graduate of Georgetown University and Temple University Law School.
NEWS
December 25, 1986 | By Robert J. Terry, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Philadelphia lawyer yesterday was charged with assaulting a narcotics police officer after he threw punches at him in a City Hall courtroom and had to be subdued by other officers, police said. The lawyer, Darryl Irwin, 39, was representing a man charged with drug violations and was awaiting a court hearing shortly before noon when the incident occurred. Police said the officer, Jorge Cruz, was standing in a hallway outside the second-floor courtroom, reviewing his file on Irwin's client when the lawyer told him, "There's no need to read that stuff.
NEWS
May 17, 2001 | By Dominic Sama INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Paul Maloney, 93, of Bryn Mawr, a retired Center City fiduciary lawyer and former president of the Citizens Crime Commission of Philadelphia, died at his home Monday of complications from diabetes. Mr. Maloney practiced for more than 40 years, specializing in administering estates and trusts. He started in 1936 with the Center City law firm of Evans, Bayard & Frick and remained there until the start of World War II, when he entered the Navy. He was assigned to the Navy's Office of the General Counsel in Washington.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 24, 2014 | BY DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer geringd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5961
AFTER LIVING since 1968 in the Logan house owned by her mother and her stepfather, and raising her children there, Deborah Sharper nearly lost it in a sheriff's sale last year because of a tangled title. Her mother died shortly before her stepfather in 1998, so even though Sharper lived in the house and paid the bills, the only legal heir was her stepfather's natural daughter, who had a house of her own. "I was scared to death because I've lived here since I was 13," said Sharper, 60, whose name has never been on the title.
NEWS
October 24, 2014 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
For a profession that burnishes an image of dispassion and decorum, what's happening with the Pennsylvania Supreme Court is like a food fight at a very public banquet. Lawyers, academics, and bar association officials sit dumbstruck, embarrassed to watch, afraid to look away, even more afraid of what might be coming next. "My hope is that I never have to hear one more word about this again, but I'm afraid that I'm going to," said Richard B. Klein, a retired judge of 36 years, 28 years on Philadelphia Common Pleas Court, eight on Superior Court.
NEWS
October 16, 2014 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
A lawyer for the contractor charged with causing the Center City building collapse that killed seven people last year was found in contempt of court Tuesday for speaking to reporters despite a judge's gag order in the case. Common Pleas Court Judge Benjamin Lerner found William Hobson in "indirect civil contempt" of court for remarks he made to Philly.com and the Philadelphia Daily News, which are owned by the same company as The Inquirer. Hobson is the lawyer for Griffin T. Campbell, 50, the contractor, who, with excavator operator Sean Benschop, 43, is charged in the deaths of the seven victims.
NEWS
October 16, 2014 | BY MENSAH M. DEAN, Daily News Staff Writer deanm@phillynews.com, 215-568-8278
THE ATTORNEY representing the contractor charged with helping cause the building collapse at 22nd and Market streets that killed six people last year was found to be in contempt of court yesterday and fined $100. Common Pleas Judge Benjamin Lerner convicted defense lawyer William Hobson of indirect civil contempt for violating a gag order the judge issued Sept. 16 that barred attorneys working on the case from talking to reporters. Lerner initially fined Hobson $250 but reduced the amount to $100 after Hobson apologized, said he would not speak to reporters again and asked if he could perform community service instead of paying the fine.
NEWS
October 8, 2014 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
Lawyers for former Philadelphia mob boss Joseph "Skinny Joey" Merlino said Monday that "the government is out of time" and urged a federal judge to halt prosecutors' efforts to put their client back behind bars for an alleged probation violation three years after his release from prison. In a filing Monday in U.S. District Court in Philadelphia, attorneys Edwin J. Jacobs Jr. and Michael F. Myers said the 52-year-old ex-don had faithfully complied with all requirements of his postprison supervision and questioned prosecutors' efforts to incarcerate him just as the probationary term was set to end. "For the last three years, Joseph has scrupulously abided by the conditions of his supervised release," the lawyers wrote.
NEWS
October 8, 2014 | BY WILLIAM BENDER, Daily News Staff Writer benderw@phillynews.com, 215-854-5255
SINCE HIS RELEASE from federal prison in 2011, Joey Merlino has been working hard, keeping his nose clean and making monthly restitution payments. He even volunteered with a group that trains teachers who work with children with autism. But he did not violate his probation. That's what Merlino's lawyers, Edwin Jacobs Jr. and Michael F. Myers, wrote in a legal memo filed yesterday, claiming that Merlino has "scrupulously abided" by the terms of his supervised release while living in Florida.
BUSINESS
October 3, 2014 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
On July 26, 2009, Ryan Caruso rear-ended a car in the northbound middle lane of Roosevelt Boulevard about 2 a.m. His car was disabled in the crash, so, as he sat in the driver's seat, his passenger Patrick Hennessy got out and, with the driver of the other car, attempted to push Caruso's vehicle to the side of the road. It was Hennessy's bad luck that a third car crashed into him, pinning him against the car he was trying to move off the highway. He suffered grievous injuries and, after weeks of treatment, his right leg was amputated just above the knee.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 2014 | By Howard Gensler
THE CELEBRITY-GOSSIP universe is getting over its hangover today. George Clooney is married. What do we do now? According to the Associated Press, the newlyweds (Clooney and civil-rights lawyer Amal Alamuddin ) emerged yesterday from the seven-star Aman Hotel (yeah, seven! Take that Motel 6) where they were married a day earlier. George, in a light-gray suit, sported a simple wedding band on his left hand. Amal, in a flouncy, white, short dress with pastel-colored appliques resembling flower blossoms, wore a thin band studded with what appeared to be roundish diamonds.
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