FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
September 25, 2003 | By George Anastasia INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's a lot of mozzarella. More than 600 tons, in fact, worth more than $1.5 million wholesale, say its producers. It was delivered from California in a series of shipments in May and June to a local distributor based in Marlton. But that is about all that Valley Gold, the manufacturer, and Joseph Profaci, the recipient, agree on. Lawyers for both sides spent more than two hours in U.S. District Court in Camden yesterday churning the issues in a breach-of-contract/fraud case based on a civil complaint filed last month by Valley Gold.
NEWS
April 9, 2015 | By Sandy Bauers, For The Inquirer
  More than two weeks after a Wilmington family was sickened after being exposed to a toxic and banned pesticide at a vacation condo in the U.S. Virgin Islands, the father and two teenage sons remain hospitalized. Stephen Esmond, an administrator at the Tatnall School in Wilmington, is conscious but unable to move, and his sons are still in comas, his lawyer has told CNN. In a subsequent news release, the lawyer said Esmond was "improving and stable" and the boys remained in critical condition.
NEWS
November 10, 2014 | BY JULIE SHAW, Daily News Staff Writer shawj@phillynews.com, 215-854-2592
AN APPELLATE-COURT panel yesterday denied ex-narcotics cop Thomas Liciardello's request to be released from prison pending his trial on racketeering conspiracy and robbery charges. Liciardello, 38, is the alleged ringleader of a group of ex-narcs accused of robbing suspected drug dealers, at times violently. Defense lawyer Jeffrey Miller said the 3rd Circuit appeal centered on the lack of "clear and compelling evidence that [Liciardello] posed a threat to witnesses or the community.
NEWS
April 6, 2012 | By Mark Scolforo, Associated Press
BELLEFONTE - Former Pennsylvania State University assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky's lawyer said after a short pretrial hearing Thursday that he expected the presiding judge to soon dismiss defense motions to have the child sexual abuse charges thrown out, but he hoped he would allow them to be refiled after more evidence is disclosed by prosecutors. During a 20-minute hearing attended by the retired defensive coordinator and his wife, Sandusky defense attorney Joe Amendola withdrew his attempt to prevent the Attorney General's Office from using at trial secretly recorded conversations between Sandusky and two of the 10 boys he is accused of sexually abusing.
NEWS
October 20, 1991 | By Daniel Rubin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Leonard J. Schwartz, 92, an attorney for 70 years with the law firm of Fox, Rothschild, O'Brien & Frankel, died Friday at his Rittenhouse Square home. Mr. Schwartz was born in Russia and immigrated to the United States at age 7. He went on to help develop the state's worker-compensation law. He attended South Philadelphia High School and was elected president of the Class of 1919. He enrolled at the University of Pennsylvania with the intention of becoming an engineer. While in school, his interests shifted toward law and he transferred to Temple University, where he earned his law degree.
NEWS
May 21, 1986 | By JIM NICHOLSON, Daily News Staff Writer
Herman J. Obert, an attorney for nearly 50 years, died Monday. He was 75 and lived in Bryn Mawr. A Philadelphia lawyer who specialized in probate, charitable trusts and construction, he was a member of the firm of Monteverde, Hemphill, Maschmeyer & Obert. He previously had been a member in the firm of Gibbons, Eustace & Obert. He was active in the Catholic Charities organization and represented a number of orders and societies. The son of a Roxborough brewer, Obert was educated at Georgetown Preparatory School and was a graduate of Georgetown University and Temple University Law School.
NEWS
June 26, 2013 | By Jia Lynn Yang, Washington Post
HONG KONG - Edward Snowden's surprising exit from this city was prompted by a mysterious messenger who relayed to the former contractor that he should leave Hong Kong - and that if he tried to go, he would not be stopped, one of his lawyers said Monday. Unsure whether to trust this person but aware that his options were dwindling, Snowden decided to go for it, said the lawyer, Albert Ho. On Sunday morning, the 30-year-old American, who leaked top-secret U.S. documents, went to the airport with another of his lawyers, used his own passport, and boarded an Aeroflot flight to Moscow without special assistance, according to Ho, all while plainclothes police officers hovered around him. The circumstances of Snowden's departure from Hong Kong have baffled lawmakers and legal experts here who expected a drawn-out battle in the courts of this semiautonomous region.
NEWS
July 25, 2010 | By Joseph Tanfani and Mark Fazlollah, Inquirer Staff Writers
These days, Pennsylvania Chief Justice Ronald D. Castille says he feels betrayed by his onetime lawyer in the Family Court project. "If I was in the Marine Corps, the guy would be stripped of his rank. He'd be drummed out," Castille said of Jeffrey B. Rotwitt, who was getting paid on both sides of the $200 million deal to build a courthouse at 15th and Arch Streets. But that wasn't the case in April. When Castille was first asked about Rotwitt's codeveloper role, he didn't seem upset with Rotwitt at all. Instead, he was angry at being questioned about it. With an Inquirer writer pushing court officials for an explanation, Rotwitt met with Castille, then e-mailed him a suggested "clear statement of the facts": Yes, Rotwitt and Donald Pulver were codevelopers, the statement said, without suggesting it was any sort of problem.
NEWS
December 25, 1986 | By Robert J. Terry, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Philadelphia lawyer yesterday was charged with assaulting a narcotics police officer after he threw punches at him in a City Hall courtroom and had to be subdued by other officers, police said. The lawyer, Darryl Irwin, 39, was representing a man charged with drug violations and was awaiting a court hearing shortly before noon when the incident occurred. Police said the officer, Jorge Cruz, was standing in a hallway outside the second-floor courtroom, reviewing his file on Irwin's client when the lawyer told him, "There's no need to read that stuff.
NEWS
May 17, 2001 | By Dominic Sama INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Paul Maloney, 93, of Bryn Mawr, a retired Center City fiduciary lawyer and former president of the Citizens Crime Commission of Philadelphia, died at his home Monday of complications from diabetes. Mr. Maloney practiced for more than 40 years, specializing in administering estates and trusts. He started in 1936 with the Center City law firm of Evans, Bayard & Frick and remained there until the start of World War II, when he entered the Navy. He was assigned to the Navy's Office of the General Counsel in Washington.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 10, 2015 | By Laura McCrystal, Inquirer Staff Writer
As Gregory Noonan's workload as a defense attorney increased, so did his own criminal activity. The onetime Montgomery County lawyer stole $87,000 from one client. He accepted oxycodone pills as payment from another. And he sold hundreds of those pills to an undercover officer - a day after a jury convicted another client of running a "pill mill. " Noonan, 54, was sentenced Wednesday to five to 15 years in state prison for theft, forgery, dealing drugs, and other offenses. Appearing as a defendant in the Norristown courthouse where he typically defended clients, Noonan apologized and told County Court Judge William Carpenter he committed the crimes because he was "wearing a lot of hats.
NEWS
April 9, 2015 | By Chris Brennan, Inquirer Staff Writer
City Commissioner Stephanie Singer's bid to get back on the May 19 ballot is dead - for now. Common Pleas Court Judge Joel Johnson refused Tuesday to reverse his ruling from last week removing her name because she did not have at least 1,000 signatures on nomination petitions. Singer, a former mathematics professor and Democratic ward leader, had 996 valid signatures remaining when a four-day legal challenge ended early on March 27. Johnson on Tuesday rejected Singer's last-minute attempt to disqualify a handwriting expert who examined her petitions.
NEWS
April 9, 2015 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
Last week, pot dealer Jason Kennedy told a federal court jury that when a Philadelphia narcotics officer burst into his condo with a sledgehammer in 2010, he thought he was being robbed. He tackled the man to the floor, he said, and was punched in the mouth for his efforts. "Do you like to fight?" Kennedy was asked as his testimony continued Tuesday. He replied: "Yeah, if I'm being attacked. " And for the rest of his time on the witness stand, Kennedy, 42, did everything but throw a punch at those asking the questions to try to prove it. The corruption trial of six members of an elite Philadelphia drug squad continued with blistering cross-examination of Kennedy - a three-hour verbal tussle that left both witness and defense counsel all but bruised and bloodied.
NEWS
April 9, 2015 | By Sandy Bauers, For The Inquirer
  More than two weeks after a Wilmington family was sickened after being exposed to a toxic and banned pesticide at a vacation condo in the U.S. Virgin Islands, the father and two teenage sons remain hospitalized. Stephen Esmond, an administrator at the Tatnall School in Wilmington, is conscious but unable to move, and his sons are still in comas, his lawyer has told CNN. In a subsequent news release, the lawyer said Esmond was "improving and stable" and the boys remained in critical condition.
NEWS
April 9, 2015 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia "condo king" Allan Domb, a candidate in the crowded City Council at-large race, aired a TV ad Tuesday pledging to forgo a salary if elected. Domb is the first - and could be the only - candidate in a Council race to go on TV. He wouldn't say what the ad buy cost but said 150 to 200 commercials would air each week leading up to the May 19 Democratic primary. The first aired Tuesday on Fox29. Federal Communication Commission reports show Domb's campaign is spending $312,325 for the 30-second spots on PHL17, 6ABC, and Fox29 through May 15. In the ad, Domb pledges to donate his $127,000 Council salary to Philadelphia's cash-strapped schools if elected.
NEWS
April 5, 2015 | By Ben Finley, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pennsylvania Attorney General Kathleen G. Kane won't step down, her spokesman said Friday after fresh allegations of misconduct stirred calls for her resignation and another key aide left her office. Lanny Davis, Kane's private publicist and lawyer, said the embattled prosecutor is innocent and the victim of "cowardly," anonymous people who are out to destroy her career. "She hasn't even been indicted, much less convicted, and yet people are asking for her resignation based on purely anonymous accusations," Davis said.
NEWS
April 4, 2015 | By Jonathan Tamari and Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Staff Writers
NEWARK, N.J. - Sen. Robert Menendez (D., N.J.) foreshadowed the argument he hopes will save his career as he began his formal fight against corruption charges Thursday. Menendez and South Florida eye doctor Salomon Melgen, a longtime friend and major donor, each pleaded not guilty to charges that Melgen won the senator's support with lavish gifts described in vivid detail over a 68-page indictment. "Prosecutors get to write the indictment they want, after a secret, one-sided presentation in a grand jury," Menendez attorney Abbe Lowell said after the afternoon hearing.
NEWS
April 3, 2015 | BY JULIE SHAW, Daily News Staff Writer shawj@phillynews.com, 215-854-2592
FORMER STATE Rep. Jose P. "J.P. " Miranda was sentenced yesterday in Philadelphia Common Pleas Court to five years' probation in a case in which he illegally funneled money to his sister, then lied about it before a grand jury. Miranda's sister, Michelle Wilson, was sentenced to two years' probation for lying before the grand jury. Wilson was barred from working for her brother because of state ethics rules on nepotism. But, Miranda, then a freshman state representative in 2013, wanted to hire his older, more-educated sister, who has a master's degree, because "the quality of the staff I had wasn't equipped" to carry out the work he envisioned doing, Miranda, 29, told Judge Edward Wright yesterday.
NEWS
April 3, 2015 | BY BOB STEWART, Daily News Staff Writer stewarr@phillynews.com, 215-854-4890
A TESTY EXCHANGE between a judge and City Commissioner Stephanie Singer's lawyer led to a drawn-out reconsideration hearing yesterday on nomination petitions that would keep her on the Democratic primary ballot. Common Pleas Judge Joel Johnson ruled last week that Singer fell four names short of the required 1,000 signatures to be on the May 19 election ballot. Singer's counsel, Chuck Goodwin, saw it differently. In a large ceremonial courtroom at Family Court normally used for baby adoptions, about a half-dozen people sat through yesterday's continuation of the longest of the recent nomination-petition challenge cases.
NEWS
April 2, 2015 | By Chris Brennan, Inquirer Staff Writer
A judge on Thursday is scheduled to hear City Commissioner Stephanie Singer's last-ditch effort to remain on the ballot in her bid for a second term on the board that oversees Philadelphia elections. Common Pleas Court Judge Joel Johnson is expected to take up Singer's requests to reconsider rulings from a four-day hearing last week that culminated Monday with his order to remove her from the May 19 Democratic primary election ballot. Charles Goodwin, Singer's lawyer, and Richard Hoy, the lawyer for the three voters who challenged Singer's nomination petitions, declined to comment Tuesday.
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