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Lawyer Jokes

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NEWS
August 23, 1995 | By Dianna Marder, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
So there were these pols, see, and they were trying to raise money for a good cause. But seriously folks. Knock, knock. Who's there? It's Mayor Rendell, Republican mayoral wannabe Joe Rocks, City Councilmen Jim Kenney and Thacher Longstreth, famous-sounding Council candidates Frank Rizzo and Bert Lancaster, and a host of others who are not known as laugh riots. If this were vaudeville, the guy with the hook would be icing down his arm. What it was was the second floor of the Middle East restaurant, where Philadelphia politicians resorted to lawyer jokes, sight gags and David Letterman-style lists at last night's fifth annual candidates comedy night.
NEWS
May 7, 1998
On the surface, the luncheon yesterday in a lovely room atop a Center City hotel had all the markings of a typical lawyers' meeting: As fine food was served on fine china, the judges, justices and attorneys congratulated themselves on a job well done. There even were a few defensive references to lawyer jokes. But, as the ubiquitous David L. Cohen rightly noted, "This, fortunately, is not a day when we can feel sorry for ourselves. " That's because Mr. Cohen, in his role as the chair of this first-ever Public Interest Summit, had the duty and pleasure of announcing that 55 law firms, corporations and foundations had contributed more than half a million dollars in new money to the Philadelphia Bar Foundation's efforts to provide funding for legal assistance to the poor and needy.
NEWS
February 28, 2013 | By Samantha Henry, Associated Press
TRENTON - It may have been his toughest crowd yet. In a decidedly humorless proceeding Tuesday, New Jersey's Supreme Court heard arguments over whether a municipal judge can keep his other paying gig - as an actor and stand-up comic. Vince A. Sicari's attorneys argued that the longtime comedian, who performs as Vince August, has always kept his identity as a South Hackensack Municipal Court judge separate, and "there is never mention in either profession of the other. " Sicari, 43, is appealing a 2008 state ethics committee ruling that he could not continue working as a paid entertainer while working part-time as a judge overseeing traffic-ticket cases and disorderly-persons offenses.
BUSINESS
January 23, 2013 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia lawyer Randy Maniloff is on a mission to make insurance interesting. Funny, even. And maybe get paid even when he doesn't go to court. The underwriters' lawyer and Oxford University-published textbook author has stepped down from his partnership at White & Williams L.L.P. (though he's still a full-time lawyer "representing dozens of insurance companies" there) to start a cartoon-fronted biweekly online magazine, Coverage Opinions. Maniloff has been giving it away, since the fall, to a subscriber list that has grown past 10,000, which he says is double his target to date.
NEWS
June 11, 1994
There are a lot of things you might do with 22 million bucks. You could buy 440 Lexus sport coupes and have enough left over to gold- plate all 880 bumpers. You could have more money in the bank than Donald Trump and have enough collateral for loans to make you an even bigger four-flusher. You could stop worrying about the price of broccoli, at any rate. In Pennsylvania, we spent $22 million to get the least exciting contest since the Philadelphia A's faced off with the dread St. Louis Browns.
NEWS
September 24, 1992 | BY JEROME J. SHESTACK
Lawyers are under siege. It used to be lawyer jokes. But now it's beyond the joking stage. Politicians on the campaign trail try to make lawyers scapegoats for many of the nation's ills, from crowded courtrooms, to high insurance, to falling behind in world trade. Lawyers, especially trial lawyers, are accused of being excessively litigious, greedy and not interested in serving the public. Lawyer bashing is in vogue. Lawyers are getting a bum rap! The legal profession deserves better.
NEWS
July 14, 1994 | BY MICHAEL L. RUSSO
Derogatory remarks about lawyers abound. As a lawyer, I refuse to allow people to denigrate a noble profession. Most people believe or are led to believe that lawyers are greedy, manipulative and mean-spirited, existing simply to destroy, trip up or confuse unsuspecting witnesses on cross-examination. Many lawyers, however, were drawn to the profession because they wanted to help people, but they've experienced disillusionment. Embarking on what should be a promising career, they are introduced to the bitter realities: As an associate, you are deluged with work which consumes you and leaves you distant from the people you love.
NEWS
December 1, 1994 | by Scott Heimer, Daily News Staff Writer
Heard any good lawyer jokes lately? Well, don't look to Abraham C. Reich for any. Quite the contrary. Reich thinks local lawyers should take professional pride in their skills and put those skills to work in upgrading the area's quality of life, making its court system better and improving the legal profession. And that will be his theme today. The incoming chancellor of the Philadelphia Bar Association will address the yearly meeting of the 12,000- member organization at a 12:15 p.m. luncheon at the Pennsylvania Convention Center.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 2010
SO MUCH television, so little time: Lawyers may not like lawyer jokes, but TV drama's been very, very good to the legal profession, with at least 10 heroic prosecutors or legal eagles fighting for the little guy for every $500-an-hour mouthpiece shown defending corporate shenanigans. Certainly the product placement doesn't get much better than "One Angry Juror" (9 tonight, Lifetime), in which Jessica Capshaw plays a New Orleans corporate lawyer whose reasonable doubts about a defendant's guilt first lead to a hung jury and then to her decision to help in his defense in the retrial.
NEWS
August 20, 1993 | by Kurt Heine, Daily News Staff Writer
What's the funniest thing about a Philadelphia politician? Ed Rendell's chest hair? Jonathan Saidel's wig? John Street's gas bill? Almost anything. Comedy and Philadelphia politicians seem redundant. Last night, though, broke new ground in the political laugh campaign, at the third annual Candidates' Comedy Night. District Attorney Lynne M. Abraham, blue jeans pulled almost to her chest and blue satin police jacket over her "Abraham for D.A. " T-shirt, took the Comedy Cabaret stage, at 126 Chestnut St., with a rap song.
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NEWS
February 28, 2013 | By Samantha Henry, Associated Press
TRENTON - It may have been his toughest crowd yet. In a decidedly humorless proceeding Tuesday, New Jersey's Supreme Court heard arguments over whether a municipal judge can keep his other paying gig - as an actor and stand-up comic. Vince A. Sicari's attorneys argued that the longtime comedian, who performs as Vince August, has always kept his identity as a South Hackensack Municipal Court judge separate, and "there is never mention in either profession of the other. " Sicari, 43, is appealing a 2008 state ethics committee ruling that he could not continue working as a paid entertainer while working part-time as a judge overseeing traffic-ticket cases and disorderly-persons offenses.
BUSINESS
January 23, 2013 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia lawyer Randy Maniloff is on a mission to make insurance interesting. Funny, even. And maybe get paid even when he doesn't go to court. The underwriters' lawyer and Oxford University-published textbook author has stepped down from his partnership at White & Williams L.L.P. (though he's still a full-time lawyer "representing dozens of insurance companies" there) to start a cartoon-fronted biweekly online magazine, Coverage Opinions. Maniloff has been giving it away, since the fall, to a subscriber list that has grown past 10,000, which he says is double his target to date.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 2010
SO MUCH television, so little time: Lawyers may not like lawyer jokes, but TV drama's been very, very good to the legal profession, with at least 10 heroic prosecutors or legal eagles fighting for the little guy for every $500-an-hour mouthpiece shown defending corporate shenanigans. Certainly the product placement doesn't get much better than "One Angry Juror" (9 tonight, Lifetime), in which Jessica Capshaw plays a New Orleans corporate lawyer whose reasonable doubts about a defendant's guilt first lead to a hung jury and then to her decision to help in his defense in the retrial.
NEWS
May 9, 2006 | By Sally Friedman
Burlington County lawyers gathered at Charley's Other Brother, in Eastampton, the first day of May - Law Day. On the dinner menu was a choice of salmon or prime rib as well as dessert of rich cheesecake, but not any lawyer jokes. The county's lawyers come together each Law Day to celebrate their profession. There are warm and delighted greetings among members of the county bar association, which has grown exponentially over the years. I am not a member, except through marriage.
NEWS
March 4, 2003 | By Sally Friedman
My father was a lawyer. He loved his work, did it with passion, and often tilted at windmills in his rush to defend not corporations but principles. His clients were poor, disfranchised people. I was proud to marry a lawyer. When one of our daughters joined the profession, we were delighted. We still regarded it as a noble calling. Lawyer jokes have been around for ages. But it seemed back then that the perception of lawyers as unsavory characters who delight in the misery of others was not as pervasive as it is today.
NEWS
May 7, 1998
On the surface, the luncheon yesterday in a lovely room atop a Center City hotel had all the markings of a typical lawyers' meeting: As fine food was served on fine china, the judges, justices and attorneys congratulated themselves on a job well done. There even were a few defensive references to lawyer jokes. But, as the ubiquitous David L. Cohen rightly noted, "This, fortunately, is not a day when we can feel sorry for ourselves. " That's because Mr. Cohen, in his role as the chair of this first-ever Public Interest Summit, had the duty and pleasure of announcing that 55 law firms, corporations and foundations had contributed more than half a million dollars in new money to the Philadelphia Bar Foundation's efforts to provide funding for legal assistance to the poor and needy.
NEWS
September 30, 1996 | By Rena Singer, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Move over, Ross Perot, the Bucks County Bar Association is getting into the infomercial game. The Law and You - complete with Perot-esque graphs and charts - is scheduled to run twice weekly on some Bucks County cable channels. The half-hour program will - lawyers hope - create goodwill toward much maligned lawyers and educate the public about legal issues, said Bucks County Bar Association president Herbert K. Sudfeld Jr. "It shows that lawyers are not just your adversary in a courtroom," Sudfeld said.
NEWS
August 23, 1995 | By Dianna Marder, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
So there were these pols, see, and they were trying to raise money for a good cause. But seriously folks. Knock, knock. Who's there? It's Mayor Rendell, Republican mayoral wannabe Joe Rocks, City Councilmen Jim Kenney and Thacher Longstreth, famous-sounding Council candidates Frank Rizzo and Bert Lancaster, and a host of others who are not known as laugh riots. If this were vaudeville, the guy with the hook would be icing down his arm. What it was was the second floor of the Middle East restaurant, where Philadelphia politicians resorted to lawyer jokes, sight gags and David Letterman-style lists at last night's fifth annual candidates comedy night.
NEWS
January 24, 1995 | By Chris Satullo, Deputy Editorial Page Editor
Item: A plan to build a spiffy, high-tech museum devoted to the U.S. Constitution in Philadelphia has one little drawback: a $170 million price tag that makes the National Park Service queasy. Item: The American Bar Association, tired of lawyers being condemned to contempt in the court of public opinion, now employs a $170,000-a-year media relations whiz to buff up the profession's image. Let's connect the dots, shall we? On one hand, we have a bold proposal for honoring the cherished founding document of this nation of laws - but a lack of cash.
NEWS
December 1, 1994 | by Scott Heimer, Daily News Staff Writer
Heard any good lawyer jokes lately? Well, don't look to Abraham C. Reich for any. Quite the contrary. Reich thinks local lawyers should take professional pride in their skills and put those skills to work in upgrading the area's quality of life, making its court system better and improving the legal profession. And that will be his theme today. The incoming chancellor of the Philadelphia Bar Association will address the yearly meeting of the 12,000- member organization at a 12:15 p.m. luncheon at the Pennsylvania Convention Center.
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