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ENTERTAINMENT
March 29, 2011 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
In terms of ultimate meaning, Schubert's Die schöne Müllerin might be just as elusive as any Northern Renaissance canvas. Experts can translate a white lily as Mary's purity or a rolling piano part as the brook, but those are local signposts. Consider the fact that you can make it through all 20 songs in Schubert's cycle and still not be sure who the love object is (the miller's beautiful daughter or the river?), and you have some idea of the latitude Schubert grants his listener.
NEWS
August 5, 1993 | By Valerie Reed, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Artist Fredericka Shapiro is pleased with her move to Bucks County. She said that her work, which captures nature in a unique fashion, has been strengthened since she moved to Pipersville a year ago. "I'm surrounded by this lushness. You have layer after layer of different color and forms," Shapiro said. Appropriately, her first exhibit in Bucks County is titled "Layerings. " About 15 of her pieces will be on display at the Stover Mill Gallery in Erwinna through this month.
NEWS
January 1, 2012 | By Jennifer Lin, Inquirer Staff Writer
From a block away, Karen Webb spied the woman, huddled in a doorway on 13th Street, just around the corner from Macy's gold-and-red Christmas windows. She had been sitting there for days. The woman wore a red hoodie pulled down low, a black scarf tied in a big knot on her forehead, and layers and layers of dirty blankets and jackets. It was hard to tell if she was young or old, black or white. "Hey, honey," said Karen, stooping to talk. "What do you want in your coffee?"
NEWS
December 26, 2014 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Triumph of David was a mess. Old, original paint on the 17th-century canvas was faded and flaking in many spots. Newer paint from several inexpert restoration attempts had become discolored. Standing before the massive painting at Villanova University, art conservator Kristin deGhetaldi could tell all this with her experienced eye. But in order to bring the painting back to life, how could she tell where the old paint ended and the new paint began? The answer: a mix of art and science.
NEWS
November 10, 1987 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / BONNIE WELLER
FROLICKING IN THE LEAVES proves enjoyable for teacher Grace Adamczyk and children from the Bright Start Child Care & Learning Center. The group went for a morning walk yesterday and paused near the Rodin Museum at 22d Street and the Parkway, where the layers of leaves were deep and delightful. Temperatures in the mid-60s made conditions nice but fleeting, particularly with the prospect of plenty of rain for today.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 2014 | By Toby Zinman, For The Inquirer
Suffering Chinese prisoners. Art in social politics. Fraudulent, self-aggrandizing claims by performers like Mike Daisy. All these flammable topics are right up InterAct Theatre Company's alley, right? They're the company that specializes in righteous indignation and intentional provocation. Well, prepare to be outfoxed by one of the smartest, most cynical, heart-wrenching, brain-teasing comedies I've seen in a long while, Christopher Chen's Caught , in a brilliant InterAct premiere.
NEWS
February 25, 2011 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Question: Our bedroom was rebuilt by the previous homeowner after a fire with what I'm guessing is an old style of wallboard; wallpaper was then put directly over that wallboard. I've been trying to remove the wallpaper, but it is completely an uphill battle. Where the seams were spackled, the wallpaper comes off easily when dampened with water. But on most of the rest of the space, the paper might as well be glued to the thin layers of cardboard-like wallboard. Once the paper is saturated and scraping is attempted, trying to get it off often tears or gouges the surface of the wallboard.
FOOD
December 1, 2011
Every so often - perhaps weekly - someone futzes with the cheesesteak, removing the Philadelphia-ness from it. Enter Olivier Desaintmartin, chef-owner of Caribou Cafe in Center City, who has gone all Frenchy with his Parisian cheesesteak, which he bills as a more elegant and refined option. He starts with a Dijon-slathered French baguette, naturally, upon which he layers prime rib, haricots verts, frites, and - you say you want yours wit', pal? - gooey Brie. Get out of town.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 5, 2009
This refreshing bottle alert is brought to you by the Department of Summer Slakes, Jersey Shore Division: the 2008 Layers from Peter Lehmann is a beguilingly complex white blend that evokes an Aussie version of Conundrum - but at a nicer price. With five grapes weaving through this golden juice, there's a vivid plume of flavors showing - the exotic spice of gewurztraminer, the quincelike sweet-tart of semillon, the orchard fruit and body of chardonnay, rich pinot gris, and a peck of sweet muscat for the finishing hook.
NEWS
May 27, 2011 | By Virginia C. McGuire, For The Inquirer
Gone are the urinals from the men's room, the fake Roman columns out front, and the wet bar. But in the tin-toy-factory-turned-milk-bottling-plant-turned-church-turned-catering-hall, the ballroom still stands. And the Bodiford family, living in the 19th-century Port Richmond building since 2005, use it for, among other things, flamenco dancing and trapezing. But like the rest of the house, it's a work in progress. For the last six years, the Bodifords - parents Clarence and Lhianna and daughters Xia, 8, and Mahlon, 3 - have been slowly converting the 7,800-square-foot space on the corner of Ann and Tilton Streets: The former men's room is now a dressing room.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 26, 2014 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Triumph of David was a mess. Old, original paint on the 17th-century canvas was faded and flaking in many spots. Newer paint from several inexpert restoration attempts had become discolored. Standing before the massive painting at Villanova University, art conservator Kristin deGhetaldi could tell all this with her experienced eye. But in order to bring the painting back to life, how could she tell where the old paint ended and the new paint began? The answer: a mix of art and science.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 2014 | By Toby Zinman, For The Inquirer
Suffering Chinese prisoners. Art in social politics. Fraudulent, self-aggrandizing claims by performers like Mike Daisy. All these flammable topics are right up InterAct Theatre Company's alley, right? They're the company that specializes in righteous indignation and intentional provocation. Well, prepare to be outfoxed by one of the smartest, most cynical, heart-wrenching, brain-teasing comedies I've seen in a long while, Christopher Chen's Caught , in a brilliant InterAct premiere.
NEWS
May 5, 2014 | By Edith Newhall, For The Inquirer
With its white walls, exposed beams, pale gray floors, and reflections of light filtering through the trees outside its large front windows, the second floor of the Print Center invites a calm, meditative state of mind in the midst of Center City. When the art on display there summons correspondingly quiet, introspective contemplation, the effect can be uncanny. For the most part, the sculptures and prints that make up Matt Neff's first solo show achieve this state of grace. The title of Neff's exhibition, "Second Sight," refers to the writer and activist W.E.B.
BUSINESS
March 5, 2014 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Ballard Spahr L.L.P. lawyers who represented the City of Philadelphia in the proposed sale of Philadelphia Gas Works to a Connecticut energy company had to overcome more than the normal tussle between buyer and seller to close the deal that was announced Monday. Because PGW is a city-owned utility, the lawyers had to clear political hurdles, too. The Ballard team was led by partner Gregory L. Seltzer, who worked with city officials to negotiate the $1.86 billion deal, which is subject to approval by City Council and the Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 2014 | By Elliott Sharp, For The Inquirer
Snow fell Sunday night as about 60 people slid into the pews of the First Unitarian Church side chapel for Julianna Barwick's sold-out concert. Dressed in black dress, black tights, and black boots, the Louisiana-born, Brooklyn-based singer and musician offered an enchanting solo performance. Since her Sanguine EP (2006), Barwick's music has changed very little: she loops fragments of melodies to build angelic songs with swirling harmonies. Sometimes, there's some sparse instrumentation: a couple of piano notes, a delicate synth pulse, accompaniment from a small string section.
NEWS
January 30, 2014 | By Seth Zweifler, Inquirer Staff Writer
Before heading out for his 8 a.m. shift at the University of Pennsylvania on Tuesday, security guard Luther Babb slathered his face with Vaseline. "It's the oldest trick in the book to fight this cold," said the 44-year-old from West Oak Lane. The temperature outside was 12 degrees, with a wind chill of 5 below zero. Frederick Thomas, who runs the taxi stand at 30th Street Station, stocked up on hand warmers. Hemo Abdelaziz, the owner of a University City food truck, held his bare hands above a grill for as long as he could - the only source of warmth in an otherwise freezing space.
NEWS
March 24, 2013 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Was Phil Spector actually guilty of the Feb. 3, 2003, murder of Lana Clarkson? That question was posed repeatedly by the media in increasing tones of hysteria over the six years it took for Spector to be tried, retried, found guilty, and sentenced to serve 19 years to life in prison. It's raised yet again in Phil Spector , a fascinating, maddening, and ultimately unsatisfying 90-minute biopic starring Al Pacino as the music producer and Helen Mirren as one of his attorneys, Linda Kenney Baden.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 2013 | By Steve Klinge, For The Inquirer
At some moments, Django Django sounds like surf guitar master Dick Dale got time-warped into a 1990s British rave. At other times, the London band sounds like a loping, psychedelic cousin to Animal Collective; then again, the band can seem like acid house producers obsessed with big-beat climaxes. The musicians are fascinating because they're hard to pin down. "We don't really see boundaries too clearly," says vocalist Vinnie Neff, on the phone from London. "When you love a lot of music like we do, I see it as a problem: We could never make a decision about what direction we were going.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 23, 2013 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
However brain-bending, the Ridge Theater Company's staging of The Rite of Spring ultimately proved at Thursday's Philadelphia Orchestra concert that this ultra-graphic ballet score needs no visual aids. Yet Stravinsky's self-sufficient music should have them every so often. The Dan Safer choreography reminded you the piece is about human sacrifice. But what the music says to the imagination is so fantastical that the most engaging element of the staging was farthest afield from the basic scenario.
NEWS
November 2, 2012 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer
YOU'LL HAVE no trouble spotting the double entendre in "Flight," a stunning drama featuring Denzel Washington as an airplane pilot who's at once a hero and an addict. Washington's "Whip" Whitaker is a pilot who doesn't have to be at 20,000 feet to be high. That's the obvious reference, and it's presented here with subversive nerve: Whip's actually a better pilot than most when he's found the right mixture of alcohol and cocaine. But there's yet a third meaning to the movie's title, and we see it kick in after the bravura crash-landing sequence that director Robert Zemeckis uses to open the movie, wherein the born-to-fly Whitaker makes a series of fantastic and unprecedented maneuvers to save a crippled airliner from nose-diving into the ground.
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