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Layoffs

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BUSINESS
January 16, 2016
Reed Smith, a global firm with a large presence in Philadelphia, said Thursday that is has laid off 45 lawyers in offices in the U.S. and abroad, about 2.5 percent of lawyers at the firm. The firm said the layoffs were necessary to ensure efficiency and to match legal staffing with the needs of clients. Some of the firm's non lawyer staff also was let go, the firm said. The firm, founded in Pittsburgh, has 1,650 lawyers worldwide and more than 200 in Philadelphia. It reported revenue of more than $1 billion in 2015.
NEWS
January 9, 1990 | By Gloria Campisi, Daily News Staff Writer
Another hospital trying to stay afloat in a sea of red ink says it will lay off some staff to try to save about $1 million. J. Peter Tilley, president of Osteopathic Medical Center of Philadelphia on City Avenue near Belmont, said plans were not final, but the layoffs would affect less than 5 percent of the staff of more than 700. Tilley said more details would be available at a community meeting tonight. He said he did not expect any nurses to be let go, but the layoffs will be "across a wide variety of service areas" from secretarial to laboratory personnel.
NEWS
April 29, 1987 | By Maureen Graham, Special to The Inquirer
About 30 Washington Township teachers last night protested an administration plan to lay off 27 nontenured teachers, including 12 teachers in the middle school, which is overcrowded. After the protest, the school board moved into a closed session and was expected to vote on the layoffs after midnight. The proposed layoffs would take effect for the 1987-88 school year, one year before two new middle schools are scheduled to be completed. Opponents of the layoffs said they were illogical, would increase class size and would rid the system of experienced teachers when they are needed most.
NEWS
July 3, 1992 | by Dave Davies, Daily News Staff Writer
Mayor Rendell said yesterday he plans to lay off more than 2,000 city workers soon if negotiations with the two non-uniformed unions aren't of "a positive, good faith nature" Union leaders, meanwhile, stepped up their efforts to influence public opinion by sending dozens of "truth squads" through Center City with leaflets urging citizens not to believe the "hype" of the Rendell administration. Rendell said administration officials are fine-tuning layoff plans and that he expects a new draft by the end of the week.
NEWS
August 22, 2002 | Daily News staff report
About 200 unionized workers for the Inquirer and Daily News rallied yesterday against pending layoffs of 10 editorial assistants as part of an overall expansion and restructuring plan at the Inquirer. Workers walked silently in a circle in front of the newspapers' building at Broad and Callowhill streets, with signs reading "Meet the New 'Lundy,' Lose Your Job on Munday," referring to Inquirer editor Walker Lundy. Henry Holcomb, an Inquirer reporter and president of the local Newspaper Guild, said the purpose of the 30-minute rally was to show Lundy that the layoffs, to take affect in October, concern reporters, photographers, circulation and advertising employees of both newspapers.
BUSINESS
January 24, 1992 | By Neill A. Borowski, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Voluntary job cuts have prevented layoffs at The Inquirer and Philadelphia Daily News, the newspapers' publisher announced yesterday. "I don't foresee any layoffs in 1992 at this point in time," said Robert J. Hall, publisher of Philadelphia Newspapers Inc. Early last month, Hall told employees that the recession would require deep cost-cutting and that layoffs might be considered. PNI sought to eliminate the equivalent of 160 full-time jobs through voluntary reductions. Hall said yesterday that the equivalent of 143 full-time jobs were eliminated.
SPORTS
September 19, 2012 | Daily News Wire Reports
THE FLORIDA PANTHERS announced the layoffs of an unknown number of staff members Tuesday, only the third full day of the NHL's lockout. The Panthers are thought to be the NHL's second team to publicly announce layoffs since the league's collective bargaining agreement with its players expired at 11:59 p.m. on Saturday and ushered in the league's fourth work stoppage in the last 20 years. The Ottawa Senators already have had layoffs, and full-time employees have been placed on a reduced work week.
NEWS
September 19, 1991 | By Sharon O'Neal, Special to The Inquirer
East Whiteland Township is facing a $300,000 gap in its budget this year and must either borrow the money or lay off workers, Board of Supervisors Chairman John J. Finn said Tuesday. The township has 31 employees, and every department, including police, could be affected if layoffs are needed, Finn said. "The worst-case scenario would mean we won't have money to pay anybody," Finn said. East Whiteland Township supervisors have scheduled a special public meeting for Tuesday to discuss the prospect of a loan with residents.
NEWS
April 12, 1992 | By Karen McAllister, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
Confronted with a $685,803 deficit carried forward from last year, Phoenixville Borough is considering further layoffs that will include police, Borough Manager Bill McCauley said Thursday. In a memo sent to council members Tuesday detailing the borough's financial crisis, McCauley said layoffs were among a number of extreme measures that had to be taken. McCauley, who took office in July, said the moves could not wait until the fall as they did last year, when 10 borough employees were laid off. He said immediate action was necessary to reduce the deficit.
NEWS
June 1, 2010 | By JASON NARK, narkj@phillynews.com 856-779-3231
SAFETY COSTS money, and in New Jersey right now, police officers and governing bodies are trying to figure out if they can sacrifice for safety's sake. As layoffs become a real possibility for police departments across the state, both parties have different ideas of what safety and sacrifice mean, though. To avoid layoffs and maintain public safety, administrators say they need sacrifices in the name of pay freezes, furloughs, health-care contributions and other concessions. Officers and their union representatives feel that governments are in search of a quick budget fix and are too willing to sacrifice public safety by laying off officers.
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NEWS
August 10, 2016 | By Caitlin McCabe, Staff Writer
One week after an alarming report about Chester's finances was presented to the public, Mayor Thaddeus Kirkland and his top finance official said Monday that the town would not be laying off members of the Police or Fire Departments - for now, at least. Kirkland's assurances, made during an interview at Chester City Hall on Monday, came after a team of state-appointed consultants called for "extreme measures" to close the city's $16.3 million deficit. Among its most controversial recommendations, the report, prepared by Philadelphia economic consulting firm Econsult Solutions, called for reducing police and fire staffs, including closing one of the city's two fire stations.
NEWS
August 8, 2016 | By Caitlin McCabe, Staff Writer
Fourteen homicides. Eighteen rapes. One hundred two robberies - and more than three times as many assaults. That's a six-month snapshot of Chester, a four-square-mile Delaware County city where violence is profound. Only about 100 officers police the municipality of 34,000 residents. Law enforcement officials say their jobs get more challenging by the day. And it could be getting worse. On Tuesday, a team of economic consultants tasked with saving the beleaguered city delivered a nearly 150-page report of recommendations to residents and city employees at a packed meeting at Chester City Hall.
BUSINESS
July 31, 2016 | By Harold Brubaker, STAFF WRITER
A Horsham company that provides bedside X-rays and other diagnostic services will move 63 call-center jobs to Clearwater, Fla., in September. About 100 people will remain in the Horsham office of MobilexUSA, Mary Berberich, a sales support supervisor in Horsham, said Friday. The layoff announcement was posted Thursday on the Pennsylvania Department of Labor's web site. The Horsham call center employees have been offered the chance to relocate, and MobilexUSA's human resources department is trying to find jobs for them in other local call centers, Berberich said.
NEWS
June 8, 2016 | By Karen Langley, HARRISBURG BUREAU
HARRISBURG - As the state prepares for what could be another tumultuous budget season, at least 60 percent of Pennsylvania school districts plan to raise property taxes and nearly a third expect to cut staff, according to a survey of districts across the commonwealth. The Pennsylvania Association of School Administrators and Pennsylvania Association of School Business Officials released the results of its survey Monday. It came as lawmakers and Gov. Wolf opened a month in which they will strive to avoid the battle that led to last year's historic stalemate, one that forced some districts to borrow tens of millions of dollars to stay open.
NEWS
June 5, 2016 | By Susan Snyder, Staff Writer
Chestnut Hill College, facing a deficit, averted layoffs this week with salary cuts, reduced work schedules, and canceled raises for the 2016-17 academic year. With a $2 million budget shortfall looming, the college considered cutting staff to make up the difference. But Sister Carol Jean Vale, college president, announced in an email to staff this week that no jobs would be lost. "After thoughtful and careful consideration of all options, and many hours reviewing numerous budget scenarios, we are able to avoid staff layoffs at this time," she wrote.
NEWS
May 20, 2016 | By Karen Langley, HARRISBURG BUREAU
HARRISBURG - Gov. Wolf on Wednesday upheld his promise to veto a bill that would lessen the role of seniority in teacher layoffs. The Protecting Excellent Teachers Act, passed this month by the House and Senate, had become a political football. This week, a key Republican in the legislature warned the governor that the issue could resurface in next month's budget negotiations if he vetoed the bill. Supporters, including the state School Boards Association, said the measure would let districts protect their best teachers by using performance ratings, not seniority, in determining layoffs.
NEWS
May 19, 2016 | By Angela Couloumbis, HARRISBURG BUREAU
HARRISBURG - If Gov. Wolf wants more money for public education in the budget, he should think twice before vetoing a Republican-backed bill that would let schools set aside seniority when laying off teachers, a top GOP senator warned Tuesday. "I can tell you this . . . the governor is going to want more dollars for education, and guess what we are going to want? We are going to want this piece of legislation to go along with any new dollars in education," said Senate Majority Leader Jake Corman (R., Centre)
NEWS
May 14, 2016 | By Melanie Burney, Staff Writer
The Camden School District announced another round of layoffs and personnel moves Thursday, affecting 154 teachers and support staff. The state-run district said it was laying off 22 teachers; 27 school staff, including custodians, security guards, and clerks; and 29 members of the central office staff. A spokesman for Superintendent Paymon Rouhanifard said the cuts were needed to help plug a projected $39 million budget gap for the 2016-17 school year. The cuts were announced Thursday night at the advisory school board's meeting at Dudley School.
NEWS
May 11, 2016 | By Angela Couloumbis and Karen Langley, HARRISBURG BUREAU
HARRISBURG - Republicans who control the state legislature have pushed through a hotly contested bill to allow public schools to circumvent seniority when laying off teachers. The bill passed the Senate by a 26-22 vote Monday that fell largely along party lines. It now goes to Gov. Wolf, a Democrat, who pledged to veto it. Through a spokesman, he said the state's focus should not be on mass layoffs but rather on "how to invest in our schools, which already have the tools to evaluate underperforming teachers.
BUSINESS
May 7, 2016 | By Linda Loyd, STAFF WRITER
Endo International, with U.S. headquarters in Malvern, reported a $133.9 million loss in the first quarter after the stock market closed Thursday, sending shares down 24 percent in after-market trading. Endo said will restructure its generic medicines manufacturing business, and cut 740 employees in Charlotte, N.C. and Huntsville, Ala. Endo employs 350 in Malvern and 6,000 worldwide. The reductions will not impact Malvern, a company spokeswoman said. Endo reported revenue of $963.5 million, which fell short of analysts' $964.4 million estimate.
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