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Layoffs

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NEWS
January 9, 1990 | By Gloria Campisi, Daily News Staff Writer
Another hospital trying to stay afloat in a sea of red ink says it will lay off some staff to try to save about $1 million. J. Peter Tilley, president of Osteopathic Medical Center of Philadelphia on City Avenue near Belmont, said plans were not final, but the layoffs would affect less than 5 percent of the staff of more than 700. Tilley said more details would be available at a community meeting tonight. He said he did not expect any nurses to be let go, but the layoffs will be "across a wide variety of service areas" from secretarial to laboratory personnel.
NEWS
April 29, 1987 | By Maureen Graham, Special to The Inquirer
About 30 Washington Township teachers last night protested an administration plan to lay off 27 nontenured teachers, including 12 teachers in the middle school, which is overcrowded. After the protest, the school board moved into a closed session and was expected to vote on the layoffs after midnight. The proposed layoffs would take effect for the 1987-88 school year, one year before two new middle schools are scheduled to be completed. Opponents of the layoffs said they were illogical, would increase class size and would rid the system of experienced teachers when they are needed most.
NEWS
July 3, 1992 | by Dave Davies, Daily News Staff Writer
Mayor Rendell said yesterday he plans to lay off more than 2,000 city workers soon if negotiations with the two non-uniformed unions aren't of "a positive, good faith nature" Union leaders, meanwhile, stepped up their efforts to influence public opinion by sending dozens of "truth squads" through Center City with leaflets urging citizens not to believe the "hype" of the Rendell administration. Rendell said administration officials are fine-tuning layoff plans and that he expects a new draft by the end of the week.
NEWS
August 22, 2002 | Daily News staff report
About 200 unionized workers for the Inquirer and Daily News rallied yesterday against pending layoffs of 10 editorial assistants as part of an overall expansion and restructuring plan at the Inquirer. Workers walked silently in a circle in front of the newspapers' building at Broad and Callowhill streets, with signs reading "Meet the New 'Lundy,' Lose Your Job on Munday," referring to Inquirer editor Walker Lundy. Henry Holcomb, an Inquirer reporter and president of the local Newspaper Guild, said the purpose of the 30-minute rally was to show Lundy that the layoffs, to take affect in October, concern reporters, photographers, circulation and advertising employees of both newspapers.
BUSINESS
January 24, 1992 | By Neill A. Borowski, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Voluntary job cuts have prevented layoffs at The Inquirer and Philadelphia Daily News, the newspapers' publisher announced yesterday. "I don't foresee any layoffs in 1992 at this point in time," said Robert J. Hall, publisher of Philadelphia Newspapers Inc. Early last month, Hall told employees that the recession would require deep cost-cutting and that layoffs might be considered. PNI sought to eliminate the equivalent of 160 full-time jobs through voluntary reductions. Hall said yesterday that the equivalent of 143 full-time jobs were eliminated.
SPORTS
September 19, 2012 | Daily News Wire Reports
THE FLORIDA PANTHERS announced the layoffs of an unknown number of staff members Tuesday, only the third full day of the NHL's lockout. The Panthers are thought to be the NHL's second team to publicly announce layoffs since the league's collective bargaining agreement with its players expired at 11:59 p.m. on Saturday and ushered in the league's fourth work stoppage in the last 20 years. The Ottawa Senators already have had layoffs, and full-time employees have been placed on a reduced work week.
NEWS
September 19, 1991 | By Sharon O'Neal, Special to The Inquirer
East Whiteland Township is facing a $300,000 gap in its budget this year and must either borrow the money or lay off workers, Board of Supervisors Chairman John J. Finn said Tuesday. The township has 31 employees, and every department, including police, could be affected if layoffs are needed, Finn said. "The worst-case scenario would mean we won't have money to pay anybody," Finn said. East Whiteland Township supervisors have scheduled a special public meeting for Tuesday to discuss the prospect of a loan with residents.
NEWS
April 12, 1992 | By Karen McAllister, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
Confronted with a $685,803 deficit carried forward from last year, Phoenixville Borough is considering further layoffs that will include police, Borough Manager Bill McCauley said Thursday. In a memo sent to council members Tuesday detailing the borough's financial crisis, McCauley said layoffs were among a number of extreme measures that had to be taken. McCauley, who took office in July, said the moves could not wait until the fall as they did last year, when 10 borough employees were laid off. He said immediate action was necessary to reduce the deficit.
NEWS
June 1, 2010 | By JASON NARK, narkj@phillynews.com 856-779-3231
SAFETY COSTS money, and in New Jersey right now, police officers and governing bodies are trying to figure out if they can sacrifice for safety's sake. As layoffs become a real possibility for police departments across the state, both parties have different ideas of what safety and sacrifice mean, though. To avoid layoffs and maintain public safety, administrators say they need sacrifices in the name of pay freezes, furloughs, health-care contributions and other concessions. Officers and their union representatives feel that governments are in search of a quick budget fix and are too willing to sacrifice public safety by laying off officers.
NEWS
February 17, 1991 | By Michael Peck, Special to The Inquirer
Gloucester Township may be forced to lay off as many as 12 of its 44 clerical employees and reduce the workweek for other municipal employees to maintain services without increasing taxes this year, officials said. The township on Wednesday took the first steps toward ordering layoffs by asking the state Department of Personnel for permission to issue 45-day notices of termination. The state has 30 days to decide on the request, said John McPeak, the township business administrator.
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BUSINESS
August 8, 2015 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
It's official: Amoroso's Baking Co. will close its longtime Southwest Philadelphia bakery this fall and make bread and rolls at a new plant in Bellmawr, the company told employees starting with the production shift Wednesday night. About 200 employees will be laid off. The layoffs will start Oct. 6, with the closure expected no later than Dec. 4, the company said. "It's a sad thing," said Hank McKay, president of Local 6 of the Bakery, Confectionery, Tobacco Workers and Grain Millers International Union, which represents many Amoroso's employees.
NEWS
July 9, 2015 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
Every Philadelphia public school could have a full-time counselor in September, and dozens of laid-off counselors stand to be rehired, if a recently issued arbitrator's decision stands. Handing the Philadelphia Federation of Teachers a significant victory, the independent arbitrator ruled that the district was out of bounds when it bypassed seniority in recalling laid-off employees, and that it was in violation of its contract by failing to have one full-time counselor at every school, union officials confirmed Tuesday.
NEWS
June 26, 2015 | BY REGINA MEDINA, Daily News Staff Writer medinar@phillynews.com, 215-854-5985
TEACHERS AT Olney Charter High School learned yesterday that school administrators are expected to slash 36 jobs due to a deficit, the Daily News has learned. Additionally, Olney Principal Jose LeBron's contract was not renewed by the school's charter operator, ASPIRA Inc. of Pennsylvania, multiple sources familiar with the situation told the People Paper. LeBron, a former school district principal, has worked at Olney since it opened as a charter in 2011. Earlier in the day, LeBron held a morning meeting and informed staff that a $2.3 million budget gap would result in the loss of 22 teachers and 14 noninstructional positions from the high school, according to teachers at the meeting.
NEWS
June 15, 2015 | By Jason Laughlin, Inquirer Staff Writer
The prospect of layoffs at a Chester County helicopter manufacturer means more than a lost job for Brian Newhouse. "I love it," he said of his work. "It's a passion. " An Alabama native with a salt-and-pepper beard, Newhouse served in the military and moved around the South before starting at Sikorsky Global Helicopter in Coatesville eight years ago. "I've been here long enough to love the area, to make new friends and get to know people I consider family, and I would hate to leave," the 51-year-old said.
NEWS
May 26, 2015 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
PLEASANTVILLE, N.J. - Ramon Melo has finished a day of teaching algebra and calculus at Pleasantville High School, finally using his background as a chemical engineer in the Dominican Republic - not to mention his Spanish - after spending 14 years as a cocktail server for now-closed Showboat. But little more than 12 hours after arriving home from the substitute teaching job, he will be headed for a familiar 4 a.m. shift at Bally's Wild Wild West, slinging drinks for gamblers in the predawn hours.
NEWS
May 14, 2015 | By Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Camden teachers on Tuesday decried the school district's latest round of layoffs, saying the city's students will suffer from the loss of more educators in schools that already are stretched thin. "I just don't understand how we are going to meet the needs of our student population," said Karen Borrelli Luke, a health and physical education teacher who is not facing a layoff. She was among those at the advisory school board's meeting Tuesday in East Camden who spoke to the board. "These layoffs impact all of us. " The state-run district is laying off 31 teachers, 46 student services staffers, and 12 members of the central office staff for budgetary reasons.
NEWS
April 2, 2015 | By Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Camden School District could lay off more than 100 staff members this year as the result of $49 million in cuts that must be made to balance the budget, Superintendent Paymon Rouhanifard said this week. Rouhanifard, appointed by Gov. Christie to lead the district after the state took it over in 2013, said the district must spend less to offset years of declining enrollment and financial mismanagement. The number of layoffs will depend on how many teachers retire or leave the district after this school year, Rouhanifard told the city's board of education during a Monday budget hearing.
NEWS
March 26, 2015 | By Amy S. Rosenberg and Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writers
Warning of a liquidity crisis through 2015 and a revenue decline "a lot more severe" than they had anticipated, Atlantic City's emergency managers on Tuesday recommended $10 million in budget cuts, hundreds of layoffs, and mediators to negotiate with casinos and unions. The 60-day interim report by Kevin Lavin and Kevyn Orr, appointed by Gov. Christie, highlighted a $101 million budget shortfall for the city and a $47 million shortfall for the school district, but was short on details of how the city's long-term financial woes can be solved.
BUSINESS
March 22, 2015 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Transicoil, L.L.C., which makes aerospace instruments in Collegeville, Montgomery County, is in the process of laying off 50 employees because one product line is being shifted to a "sister company" in Wichita, Kan. As required by the federal Worker Adjustment and Retraining Notification Act, Transicoil sent a letter to the Pennsylvania Department of Labor and Industry of regarding the permanent layoffs. The letter said the first of the 50 layoffs was to occur March 13. Four other employees have been notified they will lose their jobs between March 27 and May 9. "The remaining 45 employees will be separated at a date in the future which has not yet been determined," according to the company letter, dated March 13. Transicoil officials could not be reached for comment Friday evening.
BUSINESS
February 20, 2015 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Campbell Soup Co. plans to cut at least $200 million in expenses over the next three years, with a little less than a third of the savings expected to come from an unspecified number of job cuts, the Camden food company said Wednesday at an investors conference in Florida. The savings will amount to 2 percent to 3 percent of the company's annual revenue and provide money for expansion in product areas that are growing faster than its legacy soups, sauces, and beverages that are sold in the center aisles of supermarkets, the company said.
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