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Layoffs

NEWS
October 23, 1988 | By Dan Hardy, Special to The Inquirer
A dispute involving Media Water Co. layoffs sparked a heated discussion Thursday night between the Borough Council's lone Republican member and the Democratic majority. In August, the council had voted to cut three jobs at the borough-owned water company because a 35 percent rate increase requested by the company in the spring had been reduced to 25 percent. James Cunningham, the Republican councilman and former water company supervisor, was one of those laid off. He charged that the cuts were politically motivated.
NEWS
April 9, 1992 | By Michael Lear-Olimpi, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
Some pink slips could come with the proposed 1992 Winslow Township budget if the $16.4 million plan is to pass without a tax increase, officials say. "There's a potential for 27 people to go out the door," said Committeeman William A. O'Brien, also the finance director. The workers could be let go because of about $1 million in cost increases for personnel, trash dumping and closing the township landfill, O'Brien said. He stressed that the steps being considered by the Township Committee were part of a plan to control costs and spending.
BUSINESS
December 1, 1992 | Daily News Wire Services
Some of the world's best-known companies shed thousands of employees yesterday, continuing the trend of widespread layoffs that has dominated the global economic recession. Yesterday, American Airlines trimmed 576 management employees from its payroll, a 6 percent cut that will yield a 10 percent annual savings in compensation, company officials said. In addition: Jet engine-maker Pratt & Whitney gave pink slips to 1,475 employees as part of a previously announced plan to cut 4,800 jobs by mid-1993.
NEWS
July 1, 1988 | By MELISSA VANETTE JOSEPH, LINN WASHINGTON and KATHY SHEEHAN, Daily News Staff Writers
Forty firefighters who were to be laid off today because of the city budget crisis were given a reprieve by Common Pleas Judge Charles P. Mirarchi Jr. last night. Mirarchi issued a preliminary injunction banning the layoffs. However, the judge refused an additional request by the firefighters union to force the city to reopen two fire stations. The court also gave the city permission to eliminate three ladder companies as the new city budget takes effect today. "We got a win, but the fight's not over," said Les Yost, president of City Fire Fighters Association of Philadelphia Local No. 22. "We're still going to fight" for the two engine and three ladder companies.
BUSINESS
January 22, 1987 | By FREDERICK H. LOWE, Daily News Staff Writer
Phoenix Steel announced yesterday that 125 workers at its Claymont, Del., mill will be laid off tomorrow in preparation for the factory's closing in mid-February. Don Durocher, a Phoenix Steel spokesman, said all 271 employees will lose their jobs in the closing and that the company's headquarters staff will be reduced to a skeleton work force, but that he did not know how many workers that would entail. That small staff will continue to manage Phoenix Steel's mill in Phoenixville, Chester County, which manufactures seamless wire tubing used in oil drilling.
NEWS
September 21, 2001 | By JENICE M. ARMSTRONG armstrj@phillynews.com Staff writer Chris Brennan and Daily News wire services contributed to this report
THE FIRST LAYOFFS resulting from last week's terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon have hit Philadelphia. Some employees at the Rosenbluth International travel agency began clearing out their desks Wednesday after getting word that they had been "furloughed indefinitely. " The company wouldn't say how many employees were involved, and officials said they could not predict how long the furloughs would last. But Rosenbluth, which employs about 500 local workers, also announced that it no longer will match funds contributed to employees' 401(k)
NEWS
May 22, 1991 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pink slips will be in the mail today to about 150 Common Pleas Court workers, who were told by supervisors yesterday that they will not have jobs as of June 28. Among those receiving pink slips were 40 Trial Division court officers and criers, 51 custodians and 29 employees in the adult probation program. Total savings were estimated at more than $4 million. The biggest impact will be in the custodial department, which is being eliminated because the Trial Division is contracting with a private firm to clean City Hall courtrooms and judges' chambers, starting July 1. The layoffs were developed by a committee of three Common Pleas Court judges, as part of the state Supreme Court's effort to reduce the city courts' budget by as much as $20 million.
NEWS
April 20, 1991 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
Contending that Philadelphia Traffic Court is a "patronage haven" that discriminates against blacks, the court employees' union is trying to get 18 fired workers reinstated and to block any future dismissals until the court shows it won't lay off workers on the basis of race. The union says the proof was in the pudding: While three-fourths of the court's 198 employees are white, 15 of 18 workers fired by Traffic Court President Judge George Twardy since Feb. 8 were black. In motions filed Thursday in Common Pleas Court, the union's attorneys contended Twardy and his court had unconstitutionally targeted employees for layoffs on the basis of race, with the intent of preserving Twardy's Republican political appointees' jobs.
BUSINESS
January 30, 1992 | By Pam Belluck, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Scott Paper Co. yesterday announced plans to lay off 270 people in its local operations as part of a larger reduction aimed at bringing the company out of its financial doldrums. Scott expects to lay off 240 of the 1,400 employees at its headquarters in Tinicum Township, Delaware County, and 30 of the 1,700 workers at the paper plant it operates in Chester. The company said last week that 3,800 of its 37,000 employees around the world would lose their jobs. Scott spokesman Michael N. Kilpatric said the local layoffs "affect all levels of the organization, from high-level managers on down, and cut across all departments.
BUSINESS
June 1, 1991 | By Valerie Reitman, Inquirer Staff Writer
United Engineers & Constructors International Inc. yesterday said it will lay off about 100 engineers and designers in its Philadelphia and Valley Forge offices by mid-July. "We're very hopeful that that will be the end of it," said spokesman John Renouf. "But it's very difficult to project into the future by more than 60 days. " About 26 people have been laid off in the last two weeks, and the company said it had given notice to 16 additional workers that they will be let go by mid-June.
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