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Layoffs

BUSINESS
June 1, 1991 | By Valerie Reitman, Inquirer Staff Writer
United Engineers & Constructors International Inc. yesterday said it will lay off about 100 engineers and designers in its Philadelphia and Valley Forge offices by mid-July. "We're very hopeful that that will be the end of it," said spokesman John Renouf. "But it's very difficult to project into the future by more than 60 days. " About 26 people have been laid off in the last two weeks, and the company said it had given notice to 16 additional workers that they will be let go by mid-June.
BUSINESS
January 16, 1997 | by Anthony S. Twyman, Daily News Staff Writer
A decision yesterday by the Delaware River Port Authority to eliminate 13 jobs has State Sen. Vincent Fumo fuming. The port authority voted to eliminate the jobs as part of an ongoing restructuring of the agency. But a Fumo spokesman claimed all of the people fired are Democrats. Fumo, a Philadelphia Democrat, sits on the authority's board. "This is a real injustice for these people," said Gary Tuma, of Fumo's office. "It seems like a blatantly political firing. " But Manuel N. Stamatakis, the board's chairman, said "politics had nothing to do with this.
NEWS
May 20, 1986 | By Aaron Epstein, Inquirer Washington Bureau
Layoffs of white workers to preserve racial balance in the work place are unconstitutional, the Supreme Court ruled in a 5-4 decision yesterday in a "reverse discrimination" case. At the same time, however, the court endorsed racial hiring goals in public employment as a potentially valid, much less drastic remedy for past discrimination. Civil rights organizations hailed the decision as a triumph for affirmative-action programs and a defeat for the Reagan administration, which opposes broad racial preferences for minorities.
BUSINESS
January 10, 1990 | By Gilbert M. Gaul, Inquirer Staff Writer
Hahnemann University officials yesterday said they were laying off 156 employees, reducing staff overtime and taking other steps to trim expenses in response to cutbacks in government funding. The officials said the university stood to lose millions of dollars because of "current and expected cuts" in Medicare and Medicaid, which cover medical costs for treating the elderly, poor and disabled. Hahnemann also has experienced a sharp increase in the amount of free care it provides to the indigent, they said.
NEWS
January 23, 2011 | By Darran Simon and George Anastasia, Inquirer Staff Writers
In the first week after layoffs cut the Camden Police Department nearly in half, predictions of doom and gloom and outlaws running wild in the streets have remained just that - predictions. But experts in law enforcement say there's no way a city like Camden can avoid feeling the impact of the massive layoffs, which also included about one-third of the city's firefighters. "You can't police the same way you did with half the police force," said Chuck Wexler, executive director of the Police Executive Research Forum, a nonprofit think tank in Washington.
NEWS
September 19, 2008 | By Matt Katz, Inquirer Staff Writer
Camden city employees wore black yesterday in a show of solidarity and protest as they await an announcement about who will be laid off in city government. A "death notice" was distributed to mourn the "passing of city government in Camden," employees held a prayer circle during lunch, and black ribbons were distributed by the union. Between 40 and 60 workers, none of them police officers or firefighters, will be laid off any day now to help close a $24 million budget shortfall, city officials have said.
NEWS
June 20, 1988
An early-retirement proposal rushed into City Council last week as a way to avoid massive layoffs could play a major role in solving Philadelphia's budget crisis. But the complex plan should not be launched in the middle of negotiations over new municipal labor contracts. Under the proposed legislation, a package of incentives would encourage earlier retirements during a 60-day grace period. About 6,300 employees would be eligible, and consultants to the city's Board of Pensions and Retirement estimate that as many as 1,700 people would take advantage of the one-time offer.
NEWS
December 5, 2010 | By George Anastasia, Inquirer Staff Writer
Religious leaders from across Camden called on Gov. Christie on Saturday to meet with community and local government leaders in an attempt to resolve a financial crisis that has resulted in layoff notices to about half of the city's police officers and firefighters. Two days after City Council approved the cuts and a day after Christie engaged in a verbal clash with some city leaders, members of Camden Churches Organized for People (CCOP) held a news conference on the steps of the Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception Catholic Church on Market Street.
NEWS
June 11, 2009 | By Cynthia Henry INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Cherry Hill laid off 13 workers Tuesday to avoid a property-tax increase in the fiscal year that begins July 1. "No one ever wants to cut staff, but we have a moral obligation to our community not to compound fiscal problems for them," said Dan Keashen, spokesman for Mayor Bernie Platt. On Monday, the Township Council gave preliminary approval to a fiscal 2010 budget of $61 million, about $1 million less than this year's budget. The layoffs took effect immediately and will save about $800,000, Keashen said.
BUSINESS
August 12, 1999 | by Marc Meltzer, Daily News Staff Writer
Campbell Soup's simmering financial woes spread to its work force this week, with layoffs for about 50 employees at its world headquarters in Camden. Job reduction notices went to fewer than 50 of the company's 1,250 employees at its headquarters, said spokesman Jerry Buckley. Three years ago, the company employed 1,600 there. "We're always looking at the organization from time to time," said Buckley. "We're decentralizing more of our operations putting more of the corporate staff, more of our work force, into our business units" located elsewhere.
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