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Layoffs

NEWS
August 3, 2010 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
OLYPHANT, Pa. - A northeastern Pennsylvania manufacturer of CDs and DVDs plans to cut more than 300 jobs at a plant where 150 others were just laid off. Cinram Manufacturing Inc. has informed state regulators of a plan to lay off 310 employees at its facility in Olyphant, near Scranton. Those cuts would be made in December. Cinram laid off 200 employees in March 2009. An additional 150 layoffs were announced in May and took effect on Monday. --- Information from: The Times-Tribune, http://thetimes-tribune.
BUSINESS
November 3, 2013 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
The drugmaker Merck & Co. will lay off 500 people from its facility in West Point, Montgomery County, between Dec. 23 and Jan. 5. Merck said on Oct. 1 that it would eliminate 8,500 jobs from its worldwide workforce beyond the 7,500 it had not yet cut from an earlier restructuring plan, but company officials were not specific about where and when. Several big pharmaceutical companies with operations in the area are cutting jobs. Message boards devoted to Merck have been full of discussions about which units would lose people, but official public notice of the 500 job cuts at the West Point facility came because of a federal law called the Worker Adjustment and Retraining Notification Act (WARN)
BUSINESS
June 13, 2012 | Inquirer Staff Report
Members of Teamsters Local 628 rallied outside the offices of The Inquirer, the Daily News and Philly.com Tuesday protesting the layoffs of 20 building-services employees and 12 security guards as of July 1. In a statement sent to all employees, Interstate General Media L.L.C., publisher and chief executive Robert J. Hall said the layoffs are connected to the company's relocation later this month from 400 N. Broad St., which it sold last year,...
NEWS
June 27, 1991 | By Daniel LeDuc, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
Despite assurances by Assembly Democrats that there would be no massive layoffs of state workers, Gov. Florio and Senate Democrats said yesterday that layoffs were inevitable under a responsible budget. They said that contracts with the state's 70,000 employees would be honored, with pay raises and benefits paid. But they said some of those employees would lose their jobs in the process. "The contract will be funded one way or the other," Florio said. "The question is how many people will benefit from the funded contract?"
NEWS
May 24, 1990 | By Mark McDonald, Daily News Staff Writer
John Paone, the new executive director of the Philadelphia Housing Authority, described himself yesterday as the mayor of a small city with big- city financial problems. With City Controller Jonathan Saidel, his patron and PHA board chairman, at his side, Paone said that PHA is suffering a "financial crisis," announced a job and promotions freeze and held out the possibility of layoffs. Both men said they wanted to alert the public to PHA's dire condition. In effect, they were slamming the former PHA administration while signaling that major changes are on the way. "I look at what SEPTA says every day. I look at what the School District says every day . . . I have the same financial problems," said Paone, a former real estate developer and city housing official.
NEWS
September 5, 1986 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
Social studies teacher Madeline Shikomba knows a lot about layoffs. Every summer for the last 10 years she has been laid off by the Philadelphia School District, only to be rehired months later. Raymond Tumarkin has been furloughed nine times in the last decade. And Stuart Madres, since joining the school district in 1976, has been jettisoned every summer but two. They were among 12,000 classroom teachers who made their annual pilgrimage back to school yesterday to prepare for the students' arrival on Monday.
NEWS
April 28, 1991 | By Lisa Moorhead, Special to The Inquirer
It was a case of beat the buzzer as supporters took turns blasting the Southeast Delco school board for its plans to lay off a popular guidance counselor and two teachers because of declining enrollment of high school students. Most of those who stood at the microphone at the board's meeting Thursday night found their pleas cut off in mid-sentence when Board President John Summers cut the power each time the beeps of a two-minute timer sounded. Two minutes worth of microphone time, plus a futile attempt or two at nonamplified comments, were all that Summers would allow under a new policy designed to give everyone a chance to speak.
NEWS
August 17, 2011 | By Robert Moran, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Union members who perform maintenance work for the Philadelphia School District voiced their anger Wednesday night over a proposed elimination of 192 of their jobs. About 150 members of Service Employees International Union Local 32BJ District 1201, which represents 2,500 workers, gathered at Thomas Edison High School in North Philadelphia to hear details about how the union's leadership arrived at the proposed layoffs, which would take effect Sept. 15 if union members vote to approve the deal with the School District.
BUSINESS
December 6, 2008 | Inquirer wire services; The Philadelphia Inquirer
The Pain Continues As if the November jobs report wasn?t bad enough, a raft of U.S. companies reported 4,037 new layoffs yesterday. These cutbacks will be reflected next month in the December report - and are a clear signal the nation hasn?t hit bottom in the recession. General Motors, Detroit - 2,000 - U.S. factory layoffs now total 11,000 this year, attributed to auto-sales slump. Sonoco Products, Hartsville, S.C. - 700 - Cited slowing global economy. Cummins, Columbus, Ind. - 500 - Cited slumping economies in the U.S. and key world markets.
BUSINESS
November 2, 1991 | By Larry Fish, Inquirer Staff Writer
Layoffs at one of Philadelphia's largest advertising agencies followed a bleak assessment of the economy's prospects for 1992, the agency's president said yesterday. The agency, FCB/LGK, laid off "no more than 10 percent" of its 180 employees this week when it became apparent that, "unfortunately, the majority of our clients are not increasing their advertising budgets for 1992 and, in fact, many are reducing them," said J. Len van Zyl, president of FCB/ LGK. Van Zyl said that the layoffs were not the result of losing any account, one of the traditional causes of ad-agency reductions.
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