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Layoffs

NEWS
August 7, 2014
THE FINANCIAL crisis of the Philadelphia School District has reached a turning point. It has until Aug. 15 to decide whether to lay off 1,000-plus teachers and staff, but the money it was counting on has failed to arrive. The state House, originally scheduled to meet on Monday, decided to take the rest of the summer off instead, leaving as unfinished business a bill that included a clause allowing Philadelphia to levy a $2-a-pack cigarette tax for the schools. Gov. Corbett met this week with legislative leaders - all fellow Republicans - to try to convince them to return for a brief session to deal with the cigarette tax and other issues.
NEWS
August 4, 2014 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
ATLANTIC CITY - The fallout over mass layoffs from three potential casino closings next month could have a severe impact on the Shore economy, as those whose livelihoods depend on a thriving casino industry brace for the worst. Local retailers, restaurants, and other businesses that rely on casino workers are expecting a hit. Experts say the region could also see an exodus of laid-off workers, especially among those who live in Atlantic City, as they seek jobs and futures elsewhere. About 6,500 workers from Showboat, Trump Plaza, and possibly Revel could all lose their jobs from Aug. 31 to Sept.
NEWS
July 16, 2014 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
ATLANTIC CITY - In the latest blow to Atlantic City, layoff notices were issued to Trump Plaza Hotel & Casino employees Monday, advising them that the casino will close in mid-September. That would make Trump Plaza the fourth casino to close or threaten to close in this resort by fall. It also leaves just one Trump-branded casino - the Trump Taj Mahal - from what used to be three. About 1,600 workers would be affected by this latest shutdown. Trump Plaza issued a statement just before noon Monday stating: "WARN notices were sent to the employees of Trump Plaza Hotel and Casino today to advise them that the management and board of directors of Trump Plaza Associates L.L.C.
NEWS
July 12, 2014 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
Without the all-important cigarette tax, 1,300 employees of the perpetually strapped Philadelphia School District could get pink slips in August. But the ax has already fallen on 342 school employees, mostly noontime aides and special-education assistants, who began receiving layoff notices Thursday. No teachers will be affected by the current wave of layoffs, which are unrelated to the state funding mess. Philadelphia School District officials confirmed the layoffs and emphasized that the moves were separate from the stalled cigarette-tax legislation that has imperiled $45 million in state funding for the coming school year.
NEWS
July 11, 2014 | BY SOLOMON LEACH, Daily News Staff Writer leachs@phillynews.com, 215-854-5903
IN WHAT HAS BECOME an annual rite of summer, the Philadelphia School District announced more than 300 layoffs yesterday. The 342 layoffs largely affect special-education classroom assistants and noontime aides, but do not include any teachers. The district began to send out notices yesterday. District spokeswoman Raven Hill said the downsizing is not related to the delay of the Philadelphia cigarette tax in the General Assembly, which threatens roughly $45 million for the cash-strapped district this year.
NEWS
July 11, 2014 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
If there is no cigarette-tax agreement in Harrisburg by Aug. 15, Philadelphia School Superintendent William R. Hite Jr. said Wednesday, he will have to lay off employees and consider a delay in the opening of schools. "There's a lot of uncertainty around what our next move is," Hite said. The state Senate passed an amended cigarette-tax bill this week, but the legislation requires House approval. The House is out on summer recess and is not scheduled to return until a special session called for Aug. 4. Even then, passage is not assured.
NEWS
May 16, 2014 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
When cellphones flashed "noon" in Ziaira Williams' history class, students shifted in their seats, exchanged glances, and then filed out into a hallway of purple and gold, launching a two-hour protest of Camden City School District layoffs. Williams' history teacher received a layoff notice Monday and said goodbye to his exiting pupils with silent pats on the back and nods of appreciation, Williams said. "They're glad we're doing this. They said, 'Go ahead,' and honestly, I don't care if I get in trouble - I want my teachers back," the 17-year-old junior said.
NEWS
April 27, 2014 | BY SOLOMON LEACH, Daily News Staff Writer leachs@phillynews.com, 215-854-5903
PHILADELPHIA School District Superintendent William Hite said yesterday that unless the district receives $216 million in new funding, it would be forced to lay off more than 1,000 employees. That was part of the bad news in the district's proposed $2.5 billion budget, which was as grim as expected. The district is requesting up to $320 million in new revenue from the city and state, and labor concessions. Of the $320 million, $96.1 million is needed to maintain current service levels, which Hite described as "insufficient.
BUSINESS
March 1, 2014 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Crozer-Keystone Health System, the biggest health-care provider in Delaware County, said Thursday that it was cutting 250 positions, after losing $15.7 million since July 1. "Changes in health care continue to have a negative effect on Crozer-Keystone and many other health-care providers in our region and throughout the country," Crozer said in a statement. The layoffs at Crozer, which employed 6,800, will include doctors and a "significant number of managers," the statement said.
SPORTS
February 27, 2014 | By Sam Carchidi, Inquirer Staff Writer
Goalie Steve Mason and the Flyers are ready for the long layoff to end, ready to regain the mojo they created before the Olympic break. When the Flyers return to action Thursday against visiting San Jose, they will be playing their first game in 19 days. "It's all great to have time off and be able to relax and not have any stress, but at the end of the day, this is what we look forward to each and every day," Mason said Monday. "Practices get boring after a while, so it's nice to have something to look forward to. " "It's a long break.
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