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Lazy Eye

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NEWS
October 7, 1999 | By Erin Carroll, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
A "lazy eye" helped lead Upper Merion police to the man charged with raping a sales clerk at the King of Prussia Plaza Monday. Police said the man they arrested Monday night, Willie Jermaine Glover, 41, of Norristown, has frequented the mall and has a wandering left eye that they called the key that enabled the victim and another mall employee to identify him. The 20-year-old victim did not know the man who attacked her in a back room Monday...
NEWS
August 9, 2013 | BY WILLIAM BENDER, Daily News Staff Writer benderw@phillynews.com, 215-854-5255
A MIDDLE-AGED Hispanic man steps out of his car on Aramingo Avenue with an ear-to-ear smile and his hands in the air. It's strange, because the cops never told him to raise his hands. He solicits a couple fist bumps, inexplicably, as he strolls across the street to one of the red chairs reserved for visibly intoxicated drivers awaiting a sobriety test at a recent Port Richmond DUI checkpoint. When police aren't looking, his eyes roll around, but that jovial smile remains plastered on his face.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 2011 | By MOLLY EICHEL, eichelm@phillynews.com 215-854-5909
TO PEOPLE who get headaches or feel nauseous while watching 3-D movies: Quit whining. At least you get a taste of the action. Because some unfortunate souls can't see 3-D at all. Instead of the mind-bending visages of "Avatar's" Pandora, these deprived moviegoers see just another CGI-created world. Instead of the depth of field of Tim Burton's "Alice in Wonderland," it's just another fairy tale. And, instead of the popping action sequence of "The Green Hornet" . . . well, that was bad even with 3-D. Admittedly, it's a First World Problem, but a problem nonetheless, especially in light of an increasingly crowded field of potential summer blockbusters that boast 3-D visuals.
SPORTS
December 18, 1996 | by Marcus Hayes, Daily News Sports Writer
Jermane Mayberry stood in front of a library full of wide-eyed middle-schoolers and ran through his standard speech. He told them to heed their consciences, to work hard, to take advantage of the opportunies offered them. The Eagles' No. 1 pick held the pupils' gazes. Then again, a 6-4, 325-pound offensive lineman is a captivating sight. He was doing what he has done almost every Tuesday afternoon since the season began. Outside Penn Treaty Middle School in North Philadelphia, the big, green bus covered with Eagles artwork that he helped procure purred.
NEWS
February 28, 1997 | by Joe Clark, Daily News Staff Writer
Services will be held today for Nicholas L. Paolino, student, athlete, and a father's "hero" who battled the odds until "his body just couldn't take it anymore. " He died Tuesday of a brain tumor, three weeks after his 17th birthday. He lived in Bustleton. A junior at Bishop McDevitt High School, Paolino was a standout baseball and soccer player with several teams and clubs in Northeast Philadelphia. This was the time of year the young man lived for: Warmer days, longer nights, softer fields.
SPORTS
December 18, 1996 | by Marcus Hayes, Daily News Sports Writer
Dr. Jack Jeffers soothed 11-year-old Jennifer with a voice manicured through years of similar office exams. Only this time, the ophthalmologist's exam room was one-third of a bus, which rumbled as it sat, parked outside Penn Treaty Middle School. "How's this?" he cooed. "Better left? Or right. " The sixth-grader's anxieties melted away. Her responses, tremulous at first, soon became clear and confident. "Left," she replied. "Left. Right. The same. " The entire episode took less than 10 minutes.
NEWS
September 19, 1988 | Marc Schogol and including reports from Inquirer wire services
EYEING THE FUTURE. A missed eye exam before age 3 can mean rejection from a career, such as flying, at 23. That's according to a South Florida ophthalmologist, who says that amblyopia, a condition in which one eye doesn't see properly - also known by the benign-sounding name of "lazy eye" - can be detected in a child as young as 3 to 6 months. That could result in simple treatment for a problem that often goes undetected until young-adulthood, when it's too late for treatment, says Cleve Howard, chief of pediatric ophthalmology at Miami Children's Hospital.
NEWS
June 8, 2004 | Daily News wire services
Nichols' lawyers present image of devoted family man Defense attorneys opened their case yesterday to keep Oklahoma City bombing conspirator Terry Nichols off death row, displaying childhood photos that show him goofing off with his brothers, cradling his baby niece and feeding a pet deer on his family's Michigan farm. Nichols' oldest brother, Leslie Nichols, younger sister, Suzanne McDonnell, and both of his former wives were among nine defense witnesses who offered emotional testimony during the penalty phase of Nichols' trial.
NEWS
January 20, 1989 | By Paddy Noyes, Special to The Inquirer
Talk about a dapper dude - Cheston is the ultimate. He's sporting a three- piece gray suit, shirt and well-polished shoes as he walks through the adoption-center door. He is smiling and saying hello to everyone, even though his caseworker has turned a corner with his bag of fries and a hamburger. He hasn't lost track of it since it was purchased. While sitting in the lunchroom, a napkin tucked in his collar, admirers stream in to comment on how nice he looks. He politely puts his food down, jumps off the chair and stands up straight, so they can get the full effect of his sartorial splendor.
NEWS
December 9, 2001 | By Brendan January INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Francisco Garcia walked out of the Eye Care Center on Chambers Avenue on Wednesday with a prescription for eyedrops that treat glaucoma. The center had also given him an exam and eyeglasses that sharpened his vision, making him wonder how he got around before. "And I haven't spent one dime," the 59-year-old Gibbstown resident said. Garcia is one of several thousand uninsured or low-income patients who received free treatment at the Eye Care Center last year. In mid-October, the center officially opened a new, three-story facility at 400 Chambers Ave. "We're able to take care of a lot more people than before," said Lawrence A. Ragone, "and we're in an area that needs our services very badly.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 9, 2013 | BY WILLIAM BENDER, Daily News Staff Writer benderw@phillynews.com, 215-854-5255
A MIDDLE-AGED Hispanic man steps out of his car on Aramingo Avenue with an ear-to-ear smile and his hands in the air. It's strange, because the cops never told him to raise his hands. He solicits a couple fist bumps, inexplicably, as he strolls across the street to one of the red chairs reserved for visibly intoxicated drivers awaiting a sobriety test at a recent Port Richmond DUI checkpoint. When police aren't looking, his eyes roll around, but that jovial smile remains plastered on his face.
NEWS
May 5, 2012 | By Kristin E. Holmes, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Four-year-old Sara Burke was fighting cancer, and her parents decided that Children's Hospital of Philadelphia had to be more than a place where the family struggled through a crisis. So they made it Sara's playground. Sara wore sunglasses in the hallways and an Afro wig to surgery. She used needleless syringes to squirt paint and make art — and a few times squirted people in fun. "Not everybody knows whether it's appropriate to be happy in the hospital," said Jennifer Burke, 43, Sara's mother.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 2011 | By MOLLY EICHEL, eichelm@phillynews.com 215-854-5909
TO PEOPLE who get headaches or feel nauseous while watching 3-D movies: Quit whining. At least you get a taste of the action. Because some unfortunate souls can't see 3-D at all. Instead of the mind-bending visages of "Avatar's" Pandora, these deprived moviegoers see just another CGI-created world. Instead of the depth of field of Tim Burton's "Alice in Wonderland," it's just another fairy tale. And, instead of the popping action sequence of "The Green Hornet" . . . well, that was bad even with 3-D. Admittedly, it's a First World Problem, but a problem nonetheless, especially in light of an increasingly crowded field of potential summer blockbusters that boast 3-D visuals.
NEWS
June 8, 2004 | Daily News wire services
Nichols' lawyers present image of devoted family man Defense attorneys opened their case yesterday to keep Oklahoma City bombing conspirator Terry Nichols off death row, displaying childhood photos that show him goofing off with his brothers, cradling his baby niece and feeding a pet deer on his family's Michigan farm. Nichols' oldest brother, Leslie Nichols, younger sister, Suzanne McDonnell, and both of his former wives were among nine defense witnesses who offered emotional testimony during the penalty phase of Nichols' trial.
NEWS
December 9, 2001 | By Brendan January INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Francisco Garcia walked out of the Eye Care Center on Chambers Avenue on Wednesday with a prescription for eyedrops that treat glaucoma. The center had also given him an exam and eyeglasses that sharpened his vision, making him wonder how he got around before. "And I haven't spent one dime," the 59-year-old Gibbstown resident said. Garcia is one of several thousand uninsured or low-income patients who received free treatment at the Eye Care Center last year. In mid-October, the center officially opened a new, three-story facility at 400 Chambers Ave. "We're able to take care of a lot more people than before," said Lawrence A. Ragone, "and we're in an area that needs our services very badly.
NEWS
October 7, 1999 | By Erin Carroll, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
A "lazy eye" helped lead Upper Merion police to the man charged with raping a sales clerk at the King of Prussia Plaza Monday. Police said the man they arrested Monday night, Willie Jermaine Glover, 41, of Norristown, has frequented the mall and has a wandering left eye that they called the key that enabled the victim and another mall employee to identify him. The 20-year-old victim did not know the man who attacked her in a back room Monday...
NEWS
February 28, 1997 | by Joe Clark, Daily News Staff Writer
Services will be held today for Nicholas L. Paolino, student, athlete, and a father's "hero" who battled the odds until "his body just couldn't take it anymore. " He died Tuesday of a brain tumor, three weeks after his 17th birthday. He lived in Bustleton. A junior at Bishop McDevitt High School, Paolino was a standout baseball and soccer player with several teams and clubs in Northeast Philadelphia. This was the time of year the young man lived for: Warmer days, longer nights, softer fields.
SPORTS
December 18, 1996 | by Marcus Hayes, Daily News Sports Writer
Dr. Jack Jeffers soothed 11-year-old Jennifer with a voice manicured through years of similar office exams. Only this time, the ophthalmologist's exam room was one-third of a bus, which rumbled as it sat, parked outside Penn Treaty Middle School. "How's this?" he cooed. "Better left? Or right. " The sixth-grader's anxieties melted away. Her responses, tremulous at first, soon became clear and confident. "Left," she replied. "Left. Right. The same. " The entire episode took less than 10 minutes.
SPORTS
December 18, 1996 | by Marcus Hayes, Daily News Sports Writer
Jermane Mayberry stood in front of a library full of wide-eyed middle-schoolers and ran through his standard speech. He told them to heed their consciences, to work hard, to take advantage of the opportunies offered them. The Eagles' No. 1 pick held the pupils' gazes. Then again, a 6-4, 325-pound offensive lineman is a captivating sight. He was doing what he has done almost every Tuesday afternoon since the season began. Outside Penn Treaty Middle School in North Philadelphia, the big, green bus covered with Eagles artwork that he helped procure purred.
NEWS
July 21, 1992 | By Christine Bahls, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
As thieves go, Donald G. Franklin was busy, police said. But he also gave up very easily. Although Franklin attempted to rob eight businesses in six days, he was successful in only four attempts, police said. Despite his handwritten notes threatening to blow up his victims if they did not comply with his wishes, Franklin would back off if his victim said there was no money or could not comply with his notes' requests, police said. According to police, the crime spree, which began July 13 and ended Sunday, covered eight banks, supermarkets and check-cashing agencies in four counties in Pennsylvania and New Jersey.
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