FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
June 10, 2016 | By Karen Langley, HARRISBURG BUREAU
HARRISBURG - For the first time since before Prohibition, Pennsylvanians will be able to buy wine at grocery stores. Barely a day after it sped through the House and unexpectedly landed on his desk, Gov. Wolf on Wednesday signed a law to let hundreds of restaurants, hotels, and grocery stores sell wine. The bill takes effect in 60 days, though it might take months for consumers to see the impact. Besides granting by-the-bottle wine licenses for stores that already sell beer, the measure takes steps to loosen the state's oft-criticized control of the alcohol market.
NEWS
November 29, 1986
The sordid little story of the J & G Tavern in South Philadelphia carries with it a larger lesson concerning the Pennsylvania Liquor Control Board. It is this: The argument that the LCB is needed to control bars that become outrageously disruptive influences in their neighborhoods is a false one. The J & G case shows that the LCB can't control them - even when it does everything it can. We'll spare readers a reiteration of the tawdry details, recounted by neighbors, of the conduct connected with this bar, and merely give a partial list of the actions that have been taken by the LCB. The board has cited the bar at least 14 times since 1983 for violations of state laws.
NEWS
June 26, 1987 | By Frederick Cusick, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
With a legal deadline looming, officials of the state Liquor Control Board yesterday released a letter sent to all businesses regulated by the agency informing them that they would be "dry" in July if the LCB goes out of existence Wednesday. LCB spokesman Robert Ford said officials hoped the legislature would enact a pending bill extending the life of the agency and the State Store system before the deadline. Even with that hope, LCB officials felt compelled to notify about 21,500 businesses of their legal status if the agency expires, Ford said.
NEWS
March 31, 1989 | By Russell E. Eshleman Jr., Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
Six months after a gloomy financial forecast forced a series of cost- cutting moves, the state Liquor Control Board has shown a turnaround in profits, according to figures released this week. The LCB, which controls the wholesale and retail sale of all wine and liquor in Pennsylvania, reported that net income for a recent accounting period was nearly $900,000 ahead of a similar period a year ago. For the four-week period that ended March 7, the LCB showed net income of $837,370.
NEWS
January 7, 2013 | PITTSBURGH TRIBUNE-REVIEW
GIVING IN-HOUSE brands it never should have created prime selling locations in stores - an unfair edge over competing private brands - is another way that the Pennsylvania Liquor Control Board abuses its monopoly on wine and liquor sales. Documents obtained by the Trib via a state Right to Know Law request show the LCB's flagship in-house wine brand, TableLeaf, almost always gets the best sales positions on state-store floors and shelves. In 13 of TableLeaf's first 20 months on the market, it enjoyed one of the top five store spots for sales 17 times - more than any other brand.
NEWS
December 10, 1991 | By Russell E. Eshleman Jr., Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
From the Let's-Pat-Ourselves-on-the-Back Department, comes this: a report card on the state Liquor Control Board by, you guessed it, none other than the state Liquor Control Board. How did the student fare? You won't be surprised. "The results," says the report card's cover, "are impressive. " In what spokeswoman Donna Pinkham called a move to "clarify the misinformation that is out," the state-run liquor agency has drawn up a three-page brochure casting the LCB in rosy hues.
NEWS
November 20, 1986 | By Walter F. Roche Jr., Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau (Inquirer staff writer Russell E. Eshleman Jr. contributed to this article.)
The state General Assembly remained deadlocked yesterday over the fate of the state Liquor Control Board, and Democratic Gov.-elect Robert P. Casey said he was not about to get in the middle. A bill that would extend the life of the LCB was passed, 158-40, by the Democrat-controlled House on Tuesday. But no action has been taken by the Senate, whose GOP leadership opposes an extension of the current system without changes. Leaders in the House and Senate reported late yesterday that there were no immediate prospects for a compromise on the future of the LCB, which could be forced to begin phasing out its operations in less than six weeks if no agreement is reached.
NEWS
January 27, 1987 | By Walter F. Roche Jr., Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
Gov. Casey said yesterday that he hoped a bipartisan compromise could end the dispute over the future of the state Liquor Control Board, which could be forced out of existence by June 30. Speaking at an impromptu news conference in the Capitol, Casey also said he would begin detailed work on a new state budget proposal this week. The governor, who took office last week, is scheduled to present a new budget package to the General Assembly on March 3. Casey said he was scheduled to begin a series of meetings today with Budget Secretary Michael M. Hershock.
NEWS
November 28, 1986 | By BOB GROTEVANT, Daily News Staff Writer
Now that the Legislature has left town without resolving the fate of the Liquor Control Board, Gov. Thornburgh is going full speed ahead with his plan to divest. Opponents of Thornburgh's divestiture plan, including the union that represents state store clerks, predict the matter will end up in the courts with a legal battle over the constitutionality of the Sunset Review Act, the state law that allows the Legislature to terminate ineffective state agencies, boards and commissions.
NEWS
July 15, 1992 | by Dave Racher, Daily News Staff Writer
It wasn't just the money or the E&D brandy Joe Brown wanted from the state liquor stores he robbed; he wanted revenge. Brown, 39, a construction worker, was denied a workman's compensation claim last year and was angry at the state. So, the prosecution said, Brown formed a robbery gang and targeted state stores. Yesterday, Brown, of Victoria Street near Elder, pleaded guilty to six of the 20 armed robberies he was accused of in exchange for an agreement with the district attorney to drop the other cases.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 14, 2016
ISSUE | PA. LIQUOR SALES We deserve cheaper prices, more choices As a former secretary of the Pennsylvania Department of Revenue (like Gov. Wolf), I find it almost humorous that the General Assembly passed legislation to allow four bottles of wine to be sold in certain licensed stores, restaurants, and hotels in the commonwealth and that the governor signed it ("Law signed loosening Pa. wine sale restrictions," Thursday). The governor says this is an opening of the door to privatization of our archaic State Store system and brings convenience to our citizens.
NEWS
June 10, 2016 | By Karen Langley, HARRISBURG BUREAU
HARRISBURG - For the first time since before Prohibition, Pennsylvanians will be able to buy wine at grocery stores. Barely a day after it sped through the House and unexpectedly landed on his desk, Gov. Wolf on Wednesday signed a law to let hundreds of restaurants, hotels, and grocery stores sell wine. The bill takes effect in 60 days, though it might take months for consumers to see the impact. Besides granting by-the-bottle wine licenses for stores that already sell beer, the measure takes steps to loosen the state's oft-criticized control of the alcohol market.
NEWS
May 27, 2016 | By Angela Couloumbis, HARRISBURG BUREAU
HARRISBURG - As the question of whether gas stations should be allowed to sell six-packs of beer waits before the state's highest court, the Pennsylvania Liquor Control Board has approved more locations for customers to both fill up and stock up. By unanimous vote, the LCB on Wednesday added sites in Luzerne, Washington, Huntingdon, Columbia and Allegheny counties to the list of those that can sell gas and beer - a contentious issue in a state...
BUSINESS
December 14, 2015
So far, 66 vintners and shippers - from Connecticut, Florida, Washington state, and mostly from California's Napa and Sonoma Valleys - have signed up for the Pennsylvania state liquor monopoly's Direct Wine Sales program, which allows consumers to order online cases of wines they might not find in the State Store catalog. Two Christmases ago, the state rolled out the program as a sort of compromise in the long struggle between Harrisburg supporters of the Pennsylvania Liquor Control Board and its central purchasing, sales, and labor relationships and those who would rather buy from private vendors, now that online and smartphone orders can put all vintages in reach.
NEWS
October 7, 2015 | By Chris Palmer, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - In a practice it says might become more routine, the Pennsylvania Liquor Control Board on Monday unveiled an online lottery system to sell hard-to-get wines and spirits. Call it a booze lottery. Under the system, when the LCB gets limited quantities of speciality bottles, individuals and businesses will have a window to register online for the right to buy them. The first drawing will be for bourbon from the Buffalo Trace distillery's "experimental collection" - 12 bottles of 100-proof French oak barrel-aged bourbon, and 12 bottles of French oak barrel head-aged bourbon, the LCB said.
NEWS
March 13, 2015
YIPPEE! Pennsylvania beer drinkers can finally buy 12-packs at distributors, thanks to a ruling last week from our pals at the Liquor Control Board. Well, yes . . . but before you start celebrating, there are good reasons to be worried. *  Unelected bureaucrats are rewriting the rules. The LCB calls its 12-pack opinion an "interpretation" of the existing law. But that's just lawyerspeak for "we finally found a way to make this happen. " For the past 80 years, Pennsylvania has been living under a fairly iron set of bizarre rules.
NEWS
February 10, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
Pennsylvania's behemoth beverage ministry adopted a stiffer ban on gifts to employees last week. Echoing a praiseworthy policy decreed by the new governor, the Liquor Control Board thereby inadvertently drew attention to the fact that it did not forbid all gifts to employees until last week. That's not an academic matter: Top officials at the agency, which moves some $2 billion worth of wine and liquor a year, have been caught helping themselves to goodies and favors in about as grotesque a manner as you might suspect, right down to a personalized bottle of Johnnie Walker Blue.
NEWS
November 29, 2014 | By Michaelle Bond, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sobriety checkpoints popped up throughout Pennsylvania the day before Thanksgiving to crack down on impaired drivers during the holiday, one of the biggest travel periods of the year. During last year's Thanksgiving, Christmas, and New Year's holidays, 1,072 of the crashes in the state involved a driver who was under the influence of alcohol or drugs, according to the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation. Thirty-five people died. West Chester is working to make sure servers and sellers of alcohol know their responsibilities under the law during the holidays and throughout the year.
NEWS
August 29, 2014 | By Angela Couloumbis, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - After several high-profile ethics violations by top staffers, the Pennsylvania Liquor Control Board has revised its code of conduct for employees and implemented a new code for firms doing business with the agency. For employees, the revised code goes into effect next month. It explicitly prohibits them from accepting anything of value, under any circumstances, from vendors doing business or seeking to do business with the agency. "There are no exceptions to this prohibition," the revised code states in bold and italic letters.
NEWS
July 30, 2014 | By Ronnie Polaneczky, Daily News Columnist
VISIT THE South Street Beer Garden or the Oval and try to find an empty seat. These temporary pop-up taverns already feel so established, it's hard to recall that, by winter, the spaces will revert back to the wind-whipped tundra we race to escape. Summer has transformed these spots. And, if the crowds are any indication, we can't get enough of them. Not many Philly bars offer colorful hammocks like those at the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society's beer garden, plopped on a lot at 1438 South St. Or lawn blankets and pillows, like those on the Oval on the Parkway, supporting the Fairmount Park Conservancy.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|