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NEWS
August 11, 2011 | By Tracie Mauriello, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
HARRISBURG - The state's ill-fated venture into wine vending machines might never have been uncorked if the Liquor Control Board had listened to its own evaluation panel's warnings in 2008. So say copies of documents distributed Wednesday by state House Majority Leader Mike Turzai, who is pushing to privatize the liquor board. According to the records handed out by Turzai's office, an LCB evaluation committee recommended in July 2008 that the board not enter into a contract with Conshohocken-based Simple Brands, the company proposing to supply the wine kiosks.
NEWS
December 18, 1986 | By Russell E. Eshleman Jr., Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
A request from the state Liquor Control Board to temporarily halt Gov. Thornburgh's plan to dismantle Pennsylvania's liquor monopoly was turned down yesterday by Commonwealth Court President Judge James C. Crumlish Jr. Crumlish refused to issue a temporary restraining order, which would have prohibited further progress on the LCB termination until the court determined whether an executive order signed by Thornburgh on Dec. 1 was legal. In his order, Crumlish wrote that "without addressing the legality of the executive order," the LCB had not "established sufficient irreparable harm" to require the temporary restraining order.
NEWS
March 19, 1987 | By Russell E. Eshleman Jr., Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
Gov. Casey's proposals to reform the state liquor system, which began circulating among legislative leaders last night, would retain the Liquor Control Board for five more years but would make changes in enforcement, marketing and administration, government sources said yesterday. Those sources said that Casey would call for reforms in a few key areas and that perhaps the most significant would be to shift enforcement of liquor laws from the LCB to the state police, a change sought by former Gov. Dick Thornburgh during his attempts in the last six years to change the liquor system.
NEWS
January 12, 1987
Staff writer Inga Saffron's Dec. 28 article on the Pennsylvania Liquor Control Board's border patrol underscored in frightening detail the disgusting mentality of a government bureaucracy that has usurped individual freedom. It certainly is an indictment of the bureaucracy that the citizens of Pennsylvania are driven to buy liquor across the border in the first place. But rather than come up with constructive thinking on how to solve the problem - by eliminating the LCB and privatizing wine and liquor sales - those with narrow vision and vested interests continue with a punitive approach.
NEWS
September 7, 1990 | By Russell E. Eshleman Jr., Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
Citing a review by her department, Auditor General Barbara Hafer yesterday blamed Gov. Casey and the legislature for requiring the Liquor Control Board to keep 13 "superfluous" jobs that cost taxpayers $657,000 a year. The positions, which were continued when the LCB was reorganized in 1987, are held by attorneys with private practices who are paid more than $50,000 each in salary and benefits to serve as hearing examiners for as little as three days a month. "This represents pork-barrel politics at its worst," said Hafer, who is the Republican nominee for governor against Democrat Casey.
NEWS
February 4, 1987 | By Russell E. Eshleman Jr., Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
Lawmakers apparently have decided to tackle two major Liquor Control Board issues in a single legislative package, ignoring pleas from LCB officials to quickly extend the agency's life, then work on reforms later. Charles Bacas, top aide to House Majority Leader James J. Manderino (D., Westmoreland), said negotiations were under way to include changes in the agency's operation in a bill extending the life of the LCB. "What's at issue is the nature of the reforms," said Bacas.
NEWS
June 10, 1988 | By Russell E. Eshleman Jr., Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
Members of the state Liquor Control Board and their wives were dinner guests of a major LCB supplier on a yacht in Florida last month, just before the start of a conference of state liquor officials. Chairman James A. Goodman and board members Oliver L. Slinker and Robert P. Fohl, who were appointed by Gov. Casey last year, and their wives were guests of Pio Wines, a Montgomery County firm that supplies the LCB with Gallo wines and Bartles & Jaymes wine coolers, among other products.
NEWS
December 6, 1986 | By Russell E. Eshleman Jr., Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
The state Liquor Control Board, adding its name to a growing list of litigants, has filed suit against Gov. Thornburgh, challenging his plan to dismantle the state liquor monopoly beginning New Year's Day. Ironically, Thornburgh's newly created Alcoholic Beverage Control Coordinating Council (ABCCC), which the governor formed to replace the LCB, announced yesterday that it would hold its first meeting next week. Using the argument that also served as the basis of a suit filed earlier this week by the Independent State Store Union, which represents State Store managers, the LCB said yesterday that Commonwealth Court should invalidate Thornburgh's executive order on the LCB because the state Sunset Review Act, to which Thornburgh's order is tied, is unconstitutional.
NEWS
April 30, 2009 | By Angela Couloumbis INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
State Auditor General Jack Wagner said yesterday that the Pennsylvania Liquor Control Board might have used "poor judgment" when it awarded a lucrative contract to the husband of an agency manager - but that it had not violated any state law. Wagner was referring to the $173,000 contract that the LCB recently awarded to Solutions 21 of Pittsburgh, whose president is married to one of the agency's regional managers. The agreement calls for training store clerks and managers in the basics of customer service, including how to greet customers and thank them for their purchases.
NEWS
October 22, 1987 | By Russell E. Eshleman Jr., Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
The Liquor Control Board recommended yesterday that some license fees for beer distributors, taverns and restaurants be boosted as much as 340 percent to pay for increases in the cost of liquor-law enforcement. In addition, the three-member board proposed reductions in wholesale discounts enjoyed by taverns and restaurants for purchasing liquor from the LCB. The proposals were immediately denounced by the association representing bar owners, which said that some businesses would be forced to shut down if the recommendations became law and that consumers would have to pay higher prices.
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