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NEWS
June 4, 2013 | By Angela Couloumbis, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - The clock is quickly running down for state ethics investigators to complete an inquiry into allegations that top officials at the Liquor Control Board accepted gifts and favors from vendors and other businesses with an interest in liquor regulation. The Ethics Commission launched its probe last summer on the heels of a confidential report by the state Inspector General's Office that described LCB Chief Executive Officer Joseph Conti, former board member Patrick J. Stapleton III, and marketing director James Short as having accepted gifts and favors in 2011, including wine and tickets to sporting events.
NEWS
March 26, 2013
'Why would you ever vote for something that ludicrous?" State Rep. Mike Sturla's question last week was an excellent one if turned on its asker, who was engaged in a vigorous defense of Pennsylvania's deeply ludicrous wine and liquor monopoly. Government liquor control has been repudiated by more than 60 percent of Pennsylvanians, more than 70 percent of regular State Store customers, and exactly 96 percent of these United States. And yet, somehow, 100 percent of Sturla's fellow Democratic state representatives voted to perpetuate the state booze ministry.
NEWS
March 20, 2013 | By Angela Couloumbis, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - Call it liquor privatization, makeover edition - and likely the first of many. Members of the state House Liquor Control committee made big changes Monday to Gov. Corbett's plan to privatize sales of wine and hard liquor, toning down the original proposal and making the path toward privatization more gradual. Although it is a scaled-back version of what the Republican governor envisioned, the House panel's approval of the measure - by a 14-10 vote, strictly on party lines - marked a win for proponents, who have pushed for decades to turn the state's 600-plus wine and spirits stores over to the private sector.
NEWS
March 15, 2013 | By Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Gov. Corbett again made his case Wednesday for the privatization of liquor sales, saying "antiquated" laws hold Pennsylvania in a Prohibition-era mind-set. "Here in Pennsylvania we make it as hard as possible to buy a bottle of wine on a Sunday," said Corbett, speaking to the Delaware County Chamber of Commerce in Springfield and flanked by business leaders and educators. "We should listen to what the people want. " Corbett's pitch, to make 1,200 liquor licenses available to grocery stores, drugstores, and wholesalers, would lead to $1 billion in revenue, he said.
NEWS
March 13, 2013 | By Angela Couloumbis, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - State Inspector General Kenya Mann Faulkner, whose investigations cast a critical eye on everything from welfare fraud to freebies for state liquor officials, is quitting the Corbett administration to become general counsel at the University of Cincinnati. "As inspector general, Kenya's mission was to ensure integrity, accountability, and confidence in public programs, employees, and contracts," Gov. Corbett said Monday in a statement announcing the move. "She has worked diligently to exceed that goal.
NEWS
March 7, 2013 | By Angela Couloumbis, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - House Majority Leader Mike Turzai says he expected his chamber to vote this month on privatizing Pennsylvania's wine and spirits stores. Turzai (R., Allegheny) promised reporters at a news conference Tuesday that he would formally introduce legislation for Gov. Corbett's liquor privatization plan by the end of the day - and that's what he did. He said he expected a floor vote by March 31. "People recognize that it's time for change," said Turzai, the legislature's most vocal proponent of selling off Pennsylvania's 600-plus wine and spirits stores.
NEWS
March 3, 2013
A lawsuit charging that Budweiser is being watered down, filed in federal court in Philadelphia last week, seemed to tap into the zeitgeist. Sure, Anheuser-Busch InBev denies the accusation, and it notes that almost half the beers bought in this country are still sold by the maker of the crisp and consistent, if somewhat aqueous, King of Beers. But with Americans increasingly choosing the more distinctive offerings of the nation's myriad microbrewers, the popularity of watery stuff has reached a nadir.
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