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Leap Year

ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 2008 | By Merilyn Jackson FOR THE INQUIRER
Elegance is one of the first words that comes to mind when I think of Doug Varone's choreography. But this weekend the varied work of Doug Varone and Dancers also is representing humor, humanity and humility as part of Dance Celebration's Dancemaker Series at Annenberg Center. With the body, this master dancemaker wordlessly shapes a deeply nuanced narrative or a hilarious spoof. A ticket glitch Thursday night caused me to miss veteran company member Eddie Taketa's opening solo in Lux, but Philip Glass' music quickly danced me into the piece's quicksilver choreography.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 15, 2000 | By Douglas J. Keating, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
In case you haven't heard enough talk about the turning of the new millennium, hie on down to the Adrienne Theater. There you can listen to and watch performances of 14 monologues that, more or less, pertain to the event. "More or less" because some of the monologues by local writers that InterAct Theatre is presenting obviously were inspired by the turn of the calendar from 1999 to 2000. Others merely mention it, giving the impression that the reference was incorporated into an already existing piece.
NEWS
February 29, 2000 | by Jim Nolan, Daily News Staff Writer
We can always be better prepared for the holidays. It's not that we don't know they're coming. Television commercials and greeting cards and department stores warn us well in advance. If you're not hearing Christmas carols right after Halloween, then somebody on Madison Avenue is asleep at the p.r. machine. The exception to the overkill is leap day, the forgotten calendar occasion. It only comes once every four years, like presidential elections and cost-of-living pay raises. And it's usually not much to celebrate.
NEWS
July 8, 1990 | By Pauline Pinard Bogaert, Special to The Inquirer
The big, twin-engined Caribou noisily lumbers its way down the runway at New Hanover Airport, churning up dirt and smoke. The clumsy-looking airplane, with a wide, squat body and an upturned tail seems to strain as it rises from the ground. In the belly of the plane, a cargo of 20 sky divers expectantly awaits the 16-minute climb to 12,500 feet. All are experienced parachutists, yet the excitement mounts as they reach altitude. They huddle close near the rear of the airplane, waiting for the large door in the uplifted tail to open.
NEWS
March 1, 1996 | By Natalie Pompilio, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Jackie Scarfo celebrated her first birthday yesterday, although she's been walking and talking for years now. She's got a mouthful of teeth, a headful of hair, and two younger sisters. She's a leap-year baby, born Feb. 29, 1992. Big deal, you say - thousands of babies are born on Feb. 29 whenever there is a leap year. Well, how about this? Jackie's new sister, Alexis, was born yesterday at West Jersey Hospital-Voorhees, making her the family's second leap-year baby.
NEWS
March 1, 1996 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / CHARLES FOX
The New Jersey State Aquarium threw a party yesterday to celebrate its leap-year birthday, and brothers Ahmed (left) and Taqi Aljanaby of the Morrisville section of Pennsauken made party hats and ogled the inhabitants. The Camden aquarium opened on Feb. 29, 1992, so it treated the day as a first birthday.
NEWS
February 28, 1992
SKEPTIC ABOARD A bumper sticker was spotted on a pickup in Phoenix, "I Don't Believe the Liberal Media. " The truck was in the far right lane of the freeway. - Peter Corbett, Phoenix Gazette. SURFACE FEEDERS An American submarine collided the other day with a Russian submarine in the Barents Sea. Apparently both crews heard that somebody was offering jobs on the surface.- Mike Stedham, Anniston (Ala.) Star BRICK IN THE WALL The reunified Germany won 27 medals at the Winter Olympics.
NEWS
February 28, 1996 | by Rose DeWolf, Daily News Staff Writer
Most people think leap year arrives every four years. Not exactly. More on that later. The one thing sure about leap years is that in them the month of February has 29 days instead of 28. That's why tomorrow will be Feb. 29, not March 1. WHY WE NEED LEAP YEAR Our calendar supposedly measures the time it takes for the earth to go around the sun. However, this trip doesn't take exactly 365 days, it takes 365.24219-plus, or almost 365 1/4...
LIVING
February 25, 1996 | By Art Carey, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
So, ladies, will you, or won't you? There's not much time to decide. Because Thursday is the big day, your quadrennial chance to take matters into your own hands and pop the Big Question: "Will you marry me?" By hallowed tradition and time-honored custom, Leap Year Day - the extra day added to February every four years to put the calendar in tune with the music of the spheres - is the occasion when women are granted permission to take charge of their matrimonial destiny by collaring their dawdling intendeds, confronting them with an explicit proposition, and taking nothing less than yes for an answer.
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