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Lecture Series

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NEWS
February 14, 1991 | By Gene D'Alessandro, Special to The Inquirer
Paoli Presbyterian Church will offer a five-week Lenten lecture series based on the best-selling book Seven Habits of Highly Effective People. Presented by the Rev. Richard R. Streeter, pastor of Paoli Presbyterian, the lecture series begins at 8 p.m. Wednesday in the Fellowship Hall. Asked why he chose to tailor the lecture series around Stephen Covey's popular book, Mr. Streeter said, "Most books that are applicable to the church come from the world of business. " Streeter, who is also a Mason, said the book's exploration of product and product capability can be viewed in a religious perspective.
NEWS
August 19, 1994 | by Nels Nelson, Daily News Staff Writer
Season ticket, anyone? Obviously, we're not talking ball game here. We're talking Amy Tan, Oliver Stone, Gloria Naylor and Wendy Wasserstein. A limited number of season tickets went on sale yesterday for the second series of front-rank lectures funded by the William Penn Foundation at the Logan Square branch of the Free Library. The series by four major American figures in literature, film and theater, beginning Sept. 19 in the library's Montgomery Auditorium, is titled "Rebuilding the Future," and will consider "ways in which people create and destroy a sense of community.
NEWS
April 11, 1988 | By Denise Breslin Kachin, Special to The Inquirer
The Chester County Historical Society believes Chester County's past, from prehistoric times to the Industrial Revolution, is as fascinating as its present. To celebrate the past, the society is sponsoring a series of seven lectures to be held on successive Wednesdays, beginning April 27 at 7:30 p.m. at the society's building, 225 N. High St., West Chester. Each lecture will be accompanied by a slide show and will fit into a broad survey of prehistoric, historic and industry archaeology, with a special emphasis on Chester County and the surrounding Delaware Valley.
LIVING
September 14, 1995 | By Ellen O'Brien, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Stephen Jay Gould is coming to Philadelphia tomorrow to talk about the nature of excellence, as the first speaker for this year's lecture series at the Central Branch of the Free Library. For anybody who just stepped out of a cave, let it be known that Gould is among the century's most celebrated paleontologists, and the author of The Panda's Thumb, The Mismeasure of Man, Hen's Teeth and Horse's Toes, and a monthly column in Natural History magazine. For anybody who believes that a man named Adam met a woman named Eve through a Biblical dating service, let it be known that Gould reveres Darwin.
NEWS
September 21, 1989 | By Terence Samuel, Inquirer Staff Writer
For nearly all of his professional life, Neil Sheehan has been concerned with the war in Vietnam. From his very first assignment at United Press International in 1962, to the Pulitzer Prize-winning effort on the Pentagon Papers in 1972 when he was a Washington correspondent for the New York Times, the Vietnam War has been Sheehan's obsession. "This was the most significant event of my generation," Sheehan said in an interview this week. After more than a decade of covering the war, Sheehan took an administrative leave from his job at the New York Times in 1972, and set out to write a book about the war. The result, 16 years later, was the highly acclaimed 861-page A Bright Shining Lie: John Paul Vann and America in Vietnam.
NEWS
January 16, 1998 | By Valerie Reed, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Caterpillars, wildflowers, watershed associations, and Bucks County's natural landscape are just some of the topics that will be covered in the weekly winter lecture series at Bowman's Hill Wildflower Preserve in Washington Crossing Historic Park. "We've tried to put together a variety of programs that are interesting, in and of themselves as a Sunday diversion, and that are also informative," said Paul Teese, the new director at the preserve. "The intent is both educational and entertaining.
NEWS
May 7, 1987 | By Kathy Boccella, Special to The Inquirer
Main Line Forum, the popular lecture series whose speakers have ranged from top political analysts to Broadway producers, has been canceled, the victim of escalating speaker fees and dwindling attendance, the organizers have announced. The program had suffered serious financial losses over the last several years and could no longer afford to pay high speaker fees, which this year averaged $5,000 to $6,000, said Richard Berkof, Forum chairman. "Speaker fees have escalated at a much higher rate than we can, in all conscience, raise the ticket prices," Berkof said.
NEWS
February 16, 1992 | By Michael Lear-Olimpi, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
The home front in World War II is the focus of a free public lecture series at Camden County College's Blackwood campus on Wednesday evenings through April 1. "World War II Comes to America: The Experiences of Ordinary Citizens from G.I. Joe to Rosie the Riveter" explores life in the United States before and during the conflict. The next lecture will be "Blacks in the World War II Era" by Raymond Wolters, professor of history at the University of Delaware. His talk will take place at 7:30 p.m. on Wednesday in the Dennis Flyer Memorial Theatre.
NEWS
February 24, 1991 | By Dan Cornwell, Special to The Inquirer
Professor Gabor S. Boritt of Gettysburg College will deliver the first in a semiannual series of history lectures at the Haverford School on Lancaster Avenue in Haverford at 8 p.m. March 4. The topic of the lecture will be "Punch Lincoln: The British Humor Magazine Looks at the American Civil War President. " Boritt's lecture is a part of a larger emphasis the school has placed in recent months on Civil War history in honor of its late headmaster, Davis R. Parker. Parker, who was a Civil War enthusiast, died in 1989, two years after retiring from his post at the school and moving to Gettysburg with his wife, Jane.
NEWS
April 13, 2004 | By Martha Woodall INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
An array of high-powered women who are tops in their fields will share details of their professional lives and describe their efforts to balance career and family in a series of talks beginning this week at Springside School in Chestnut Hill. The public lecture series will be the highlight of a yearlong celebration marking the 125th anniversary of the city's oldest private school for girls. Titled "Illuminating Women," the speaker series will include U.S. Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O'Connor; Amy Gutmann, president-elect of the University of Pennsylvania; and international opera star Frederica von Stade.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 10, 2016 | By Mike Newall, Columnist
If Jim Mundy had it his way, we'd toss the Liberty Bell into the Delaware, and dig up Ben Franklin and send him back to Boston. "Ben Franklin is this black hole," Mundy said while standing in the soft light of the Union League's Lincoln Room. "It just worked out that way. He sucked up all the rest of Philadelphia history. "If it doesn't have to do with Ben Franklin and the Liberty Bell, it doesn't matter. " Mundy is the director of education and programming at the Union League, a preeminent authority on Philadelphia history, and an exceedingly gracious man. He is not actually advocating for the exhumation of our most beloved founding father.
NEWS
January 12, 2013
A graveside service was held Thursday, Jan. 3, in Gotha, Fla., for Edith R. Helman, 86, a former Media resident who died Tuesday, Jan. 1, of a series of strokes in a care facility in Orlando. Known as Edie, Mrs. Helman was born in Lodz, Poland. Her family moved to Havana and later to Minneapolis. Mrs. Helman graduated from the University of Minnesota and returned for a master's degree in physiological chemistry. She married Emil Helman the day after graduation; they later divorced.
NEWS
February 24, 2012 | McCLATCHY NEWSPAPERS
MIAMI - Bob Green, a onetime radio DJ who married pop singer and Miss Oklahoma Anita Bryant, was found dead Jan. 26 in his Miami Beach home. He was 80. Green managed his wife's rise to stardom as an entertainer and Florida citrus spokeswoman, then followed her into anti-gay activism, which ultimately destroyed their careers - and marriage in 1980. For more than 30 years, Green lived quietly, alone and resentful. "Bob internalized a lot of his own anger and frustration and disappointments," Bryant, 71, said Wednesday.
SPORTS
April 7, 2011 | By MARCUS HAYES, hayesm@phillynews.com
SOUTH TEXAS - The hands that washed the toilets now are manicured and jeweled. The feet that bled on cinders now nestle in handmade Oxfords. Juan Castillo, first-generation Mexican-American, stands before almost 1,000 of his people, resplendent, accomplished, nearly regal. Any defensive coordinator in Texas, where football is religion, ranks as aristocracy. Any NFL defensive coordinator is nigh unto royalty. Even a new coordinator, one step removed from 2 decades of coaching the offensive line.
BUSINESS
January 11, 2009 | By Stacey Burling INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The scholars approached their topic with considerable nervousness, and that was before the Wall Street meltdown, before Bernard L. Madoff. Would a series of lectures at a premier business school on the history of Jews making money feed negative stereotypes? In the end, the Wharton School and the Herbert D. Katz Center for Advanced Judaic Studies decided to go ahead and tackle a topic that has gotten short shrift from academics until recently. The goal, said the center's director, David Ruderman, is to understand Jewish economic history "more profoundly, which is what a university does.
NEWS
March 9, 2008 | By Teresa Anicola FOR THE INQUIRER
In a testament to wit, irony and social commentary, about 90 people packed the house at Camden County College to find out about "Becoming Janeites: The Society of Jane Austen. " They were eager to share in the initial discussion of a five-week lecture series of their favorite author, led by Elizabeth Steele, a member of the Jane Austen Society of North America (www.jasna.org). The third lecture, "Why We Love Jane Austen," is scheduled for Thursday. "People are crazy about Jane Austen," Steele said.
NEWS
October 22, 2006 | By Christine Schiavo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The cheers, the music, the pleas for autographs suggested not a senator, but a celebrity. But the decidedly Democratic crowd was as much starstruck as awed by U.S. Sen. Barack Obama, who headlined a political rally for Democratic candidates at Temple University yesterday. "You feel like you're in the presence of greatness when you're around him," said Mike Jaye, 53, of Glenside. "I shook his hand, and I thought I was back in the '60s shaking hands with the Beatles," said Jaye's son Ben, 17. Obama, from Illinois, captivated a nearly full gym with a fiery speech about the essence of the Democratic Party as one of compassion and humanity.
NEWS
October 21, 2005 | By Gayle Ronan Sims INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Esther Moyerman Klein, 97, journalist, philanthropist and exponent of the arts, joins the list of Philadelphia's impassioned leaders who have died in the last few weeks. Mrs. Klein died of multiple organ failure Wednesday in her Rittenhouse Square home. "Philadelphia has lost one its great women," Gov. Rendell, who in 1999 renamed 36th and Market Streets "Esther Klein's Way," said in a statement. "Esther Klein's dedication to the arts and contribution to journalism will always be remembered.
NEWS
April 13, 2004 | By Martha Woodall INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
An array of high-powered women who are tops in their fields will share details of their professional lives and describe their efforts to balance career and family in a series of talks beginning this week at Springside School in Chestnut Hill. The public lecture series will be the highlight of a yearlong celebration marking the 125th anniversary of the city's oldest private school for girls. Titled "Illuminating Women," the speaker series will include U.S. Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O'Connor; Amy Gutmann, president-elect of the University of Pennsylvania; and international opera star Frederica von Stade.
NEWS
March 16, 2003 | By Jan Hefler INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
There's a renewed fascination with all things Irish, say two Camden County College professors, and it has little to do with St. Patrick's Day being celebrated tomorrow. Interest in the potato famine and Irish immigration began before the release of Gangs of New York, nominated for 10 Academy Awards, according to the two women, whose grandmothers came from Falcarragh, Donegal County, Ireland. The film explores the 1840s exodus from Ireland and the resulting culture clash in America.
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