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Lee Macphail

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SPORTS
November 10, 2012
Lee MacPhail, 95, the longtime baseball executive who ruled in the celebrated Pine Tar case and later became part of the only father-son Hall of Fame pairing with his father, Larry, has died. He was the oldest Hall of Famer, and he died Thursday night at his home in Delray Beach, Fla., the Hall said Friday. In the second generation of one of baseball's most prominent families - his son, Andy, also was in the front office for several teams - MacPhail's most well-known moment in baseball came in 1983, when he was president of the American League.
SPORTS
March 4, 1998 | By Ben Walker, ASSOCIATED PRESS This article contains information from Inquirer wire services
More than a half-century ago, when Larry Doby first walked into the Cleveland Indians clubhouse, some teammates would not shake his hand. Yesterday, he was invited into baseball's Hall of Fame. Doby, the first black player in the American League, was an overwhelming choice of the Hall's Veterans Committee, which voted in its limit of four new members. Former AL president Lee MacPhail, Negro Leagues star "Bullet" Joe Rogan, and turn-of-the-century shortstop "Gorgeous" George Davis also were elected.
SPORTS
July 11, 1998 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Now that draft pick J.D. Drew is signed, the St. Louis Cardinals are trying to hang on to outfielder Brian Jordan. General manager Walt Jocketty and Jordan's St. Louis-based agent, Jim Turner, had preliminary contract talks Thursday and yesterday. Turner said he expected a proposal from the Cardinals next week. "Personally, I don't think the J.D. Drew situation really has to affect one particular player," Turner said. "The bottom line is it gives the club flexibility. " Drew may be batting .421 with three homers after 19 at-bats in the double-A Texas League, but Jordan entered last night one point off the NL batting lead with a .336 average, and had 15 homers and 57 RBIs batting cleanup behind Mark McGwire.
SPORTS
October 24, 2005 | Daily News Wire Services
Harry Dalton, who spent more than four decades as an executive with the Baltimore Orioles, California Angels and Milwaukee Brewers and completed one of baseball's most lopsided trades, died yesterday in Carefree, Ariz. He was 77. Dalton died from complications of Parkinson's disease. Dalton was voted into the Halls of Fame for both the Orioles and Brewers. His clubs reached the World Series five times - Baltimore won the title in 1966 and 1970, and much of its success was the result of the deal he made to bring Frank Robinson to town.
SPORTS
July 11, 1998 | Daily News Wire Services
Even when you have baseball's best record, there's room for improvement. The New York Yankees found it in the pitching of Hideki Irabu, who wasn't on top of his game yet still beat host Tampa Bay last night, 8-4, with help from three-run homers by Chuck Knoblauch and Scott Brosius. The Yankees won their eighth straight and improved the top record in the majors to 63-20 while keeping pace with the 1902 Pittsburgh Pirates for the best start this century through 83 games. "This is the first start of the second half, and it was definitely big for me to get a win," Irabu said through an interpreter after his first victory since June 10. The former Japanese star (7-3)
SPORTS
September 10, 1994 | Daily News Wire Services
Minnesota general manager Andy MacPhail turned down $4 million and equity in the Twins to return to the club that gave him his first baseball job. MacPhail yesterday was named president and chief executive officer of the Chicago Cubs by Jim Dowdle, executive vice president for media operations for the team's owner, Tribune Co. MacPhail, son of former American League president Lee MacPhail and grandson of Hall of Fame club owner Larry MacPhail,...
SPORTS
March 5, 1997 | Daily News Wire Services
The umps weren't kidding about their no-tolerance policy. Seattle manager Lou Piniella was ejected in the eighth inning of the Mariners' 14-13 exhibition victory over Milwaukee in Chandler, Ariz. His crime? Simply asking second-base umpire Ted Hendry to quit chatting with young shortstop Andy Sheets. "I told him, 'Leave him alone. Let him concentrate,' " Piniella said. "He [Hendry] thought I was getting on him. " Major league umpires announced Monday that they don't plan to take any guff from players or managers this season.
SPORTS
July 26, 1998 | By Jerry Brewer, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Don Sutton learned at an early age that his baseball journey wouldn't be easy. He was 11 and had earned a starting spot at shortstop for his Little League team. He was the worst shortstop in the league, the boy who "didn't hit very good, didn't field very well, and couldn't run a lick. " So he decided to become a pitcher. He performed much better during the next Little League season. Nine wins, zero losses. Three no-hitters. "I liked pitching better," he said. "There wasn't all that standing around.
SPORTS
December 7, 2010 | By Bob Brookover, Inquirer Staff Writer
LAKE BUENA VISTA, Fla. - Pat Gillick was sure he wanted to wear the general manager's hat one more time. Nearly two years removed from a stint with the Seattle Mariners and having been rejected by the Los Angeles Dodgers a year earlier, Gillick interviewed with the Dodgers and Phillies in October 2005. The Dodgers clearly were the more glamorous team, and they also played in the city where Gillick went to college at the University of Southern California. But the Phillies, with young players like Chase Utley, Jimmy Rollins and Ryan Howard, intrigued Gillick, and he decided to go with the team that could not get over the playoff hump.
SPORTS
January 11, 1991 | By Jayson Stark, Inquirer Staff Writer The Associated Press and Inquirer Sports Editor Frank Dolson contributed to this article
He still has all those hits and all those records and even that Cincinnati street that bears his name. But now Pete Rose no longer has the one thing he might have wanted most of all. Now he no longer has the Hall of Fame. It took 24 years of sweat and 4,256 hits to make Rose about as sure-fire a Hall of Fame candidate as has ever lived. Yesterday, it took 10 men, sitting around a small conference table in a big New York hotel, to boot him clear off the ballot. Those 10 men were members of a special committee that was supposed to be reviewing the Hall of Fame election rules.
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SPORTS
November 10, 2012
Lee MacPhail, 95, the longtime baseball executive who ruled in the celebrated Pine Tar case and later became part of the only father-son Hall of Fame pairing with his father, Larry, has died. He was the oldest Hall of Famer, and he died Thursday night at his home in Delray Beach, Fla., the Hall said Friday. In the second generation of one of baseball's most prominent families - his son, Andy, also was in the front office for several teams - MacPhail's most well-known moment in baseball came in 1983, when he was president of the American League.
SPORTS
December 7, 2010 | By Bob Brookover, Inquirer Staff Writer
LAKE BUENA VISTA, Fla. - Pat Gillick was sure he wanted to wear the general manager's hat one more time. Nearly two years removed from a stint with the Seattle Mariners and having been rejected by the Los Angeles Dodgers a year earlier, Gillick interviewed with the Dodgers and Phillies in October 2005. The Dodgers clearly were the more glamorous team, and they also played in the city where Gillick went to college at the University of Southern California. But the Phillies, with young players like Chase Utley, Jimmy Rollins and Ryan Howard, intrigued Gillick, and he decided to go with the team that could not get over the playoff hump.
SPORTS
October 24, 2005 | Daily News Wire Services
Harry Dalton, who spent more than four decades as an executive with the Baltimore Orioles, California Angels and Milwaukee Brewers and completed one of baseball's most lopsided trades, died yesterday in Carefree, Ariz. He was 77. Dalton died from complications of Parkinson's disease. Dalton was voted into the Halls of Fame for both the Orioles and Brewers. His clubs reached the World Series five times - Baltimore won the title in 1966 and 1970, and much of its success was the result of the deal he made to bring Frank Robinson to town.
SPORTS
July 26, 1998 | By Jerry Brewer, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Don Sutton learned at an early age that his baseball journey wouldn't be easy. He was 11 and had earned a starting spot at shortstop for his Little League team. He was the worst shortstop in the league, the boy who "didn't hit very good, didn't field very well, and couldn't run a lick. " So he decided to become a pitcher. He performed much better during the next Little League season. Nine wins, zero losses. Three no-hitters. "I liked pitching better," he said. "There wasn't all that standing around.
SPORTS
July 11, 1998 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Now that draft pick J.D. Drew is signed, the St. Louis Cardinals are trying to hang on to outfielder Brian Jordan. General manager Walt Jocketty and Jordan's St. Louis-based agent, Jim Turner, had preliminary contract talks Thursday and yesterday. Turner said he expected a proposal from the Cardinals next week. "Personally, I don't think the J.D. Drew situation really has to affect one particular player," Turner said. "The bottom line is it gives the club flexibility. " Drew may be batting .421 with three homers after 19 at-bats in the double-A Texas League, but Jordan entered last night one point off the NL batting lead with a .336 average, and had 15 homers and 57 RBIs batting cleanup behind Mark McGwire.
SPORTS
July 11, 1998 | Daily News Wire Services
Even when you have baseball's best record, there's room for improvement. The New York Yankees found it in the pitching of Hideki Irabu, who wasn't on top of his game yet still beat host Tampa Bay last night, 8-4, with help from three-run homers by Chuck Knoblauch and Scott Brosius. The Yankees won their eighth straight and improved the top record in the majors to 63-20 while keeping pace with the 1902 Pittsburgh Pirates for the best start this century through 83 games. "This is the first start of the second half, and it was definitely big for me to get a win," Irabu said through an interpreter after his first victory since June 10. The former Japanese star (7-3)
SPORTS
March 4, 1998 | by Paul Hagen, Daily News Sports Writer
The 50th anniversary of Jackie Robinson's arrival in the major leagues touched off a summerlong celebration. The first African American to play in the major leagues was honored at each ballpark and his No. 42 was retired by the sport, an unprecedented gesture. Through it all, however, Larry Doby remained baseball's forgotten pioneer. Item: Several of the Phillies' young black players were asked their reaction to the fact Doby was voted into the Hall of Fame by the Veterans Committee yesterday at their annual meeting in Tampa.
SPORTS
March 4, 1998 | By Ben Walker, ASSOCIATED PRESS This article contains information from Inquirer wire services
More than a half-century ago, when Larry Doby first walked into the Cleveland Indians clubhouse, some teammates would not shake his hand. Yesterday, he was invited into baseball's Hall of Fame. Doby, the first black player in the American League, was an overwhelming choice of the Hall's Veterans Committee, which voted in its limit of four new members. Former AL president Lee MacPhail, Negro Leagues star "Bullet" Joe Rogan, and turn-of-the-century shortstop "Gorgeous" George Davis also were elected.
SPORTS
March 5, 1997 | Daily News Wire Services
The umps weren't kidding about their no-tolerance policy. Seattle manager Lou Piniella was ejected in the eighth inning of the Mariners' 14-13 exhibition victory over Milwaukee in Chandler, Ariz. His crime? Simply asking second-base umpire Ted Hendry to quit chatting with young shortstop Andy Sheets. "I told him, 'Leave him alone. Let him concentrate,' " Piniella said. "He [Hendry] thought I was getting on him. " Major league umpires announced Monday that they don't plan to take any guff from players or managers this season.
SPORTS
September 10, 1994 | Daily News Wire Services
Minnesota general manager Andy MacPhail turned down $4 million and equity in the Twins to return to the club that gave him his first baseball job. MacPhail yesterday was named president and chief executive officer of the Chicago Cubs by Jim Dowdle, executive vice president for media operations for the team's owner, Tribune Co. MacPhail, son of former American League president Lee MacPhail and grandson of Hall of Fame club owner Larry MacPhail,...
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