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Leeks

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FOOD
April 3, 2002 | By Aliza Green FOR THE INQUIRER
Leeks are big, beautiful and extremely versatile. And in a few weeks, when the local harvests start coming in, they will be even more affordable for budget-minded cooks. Both milder and sweeter than their cousin the onion, leeks won't even make you cry. The colorful leek ranges from creamy white and pale yellowy-green through deep green toward blue in a single stalk. In Europe, leeks are considered indispensable to cooking, especially in northern France, Belgium and the Netherlands, also the world's leading producers.
FOOD
May 29, 1994 | By Karla Cook, FOR THE INQUIRER
Even the non-onion fans among us might find themselves swayed by the mild, sweet taste of leeks, now appearing at a produce counter near you. Unlike its scallion cousin, which can be used end-to-end, the best part of a leek ranges from the white part into only the tender green part of the stems. To prepare, first trim off roots and discard the first few coarse outer leaves. Trim tops down to the 2- or 3-inch expanse of tender, light green stem; slit lengthwise. Then wash them.
FOOD
September 20, 2012
Makes 4 servings 12 small to medium leeks, cleaned, trimmed (about 21/2 pounds) 2 tablespoons white wine vinegar, or mixture of half sherry vinegar and half white wine vinegar 1 tablespoon Düsseldorf mustard 5 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil 1/2 teaspoon salt Freshly ground pepper 2 tablespoons chopped fresh chives 1 tablespoon chopped fresh tarragon or dill 1 package (8...
FOOD
November 15, 1987 | By Leslie Land, Special to The Inquirer
Back in the early '60s, when I started cooking something besides sloppy Joes and dessert, leeks were those things you could never get but that it was all right to substitute onions for, which everybody did. Then in the '70s, they were this tony vegetable that sophisticates knew made all the difference, though all but the richest wondered why the devil they were known as "the asparagus of the poor" when they cost even more than asparagus. These days, they cost as much as ever, but they seem cheaper, because everything else has caught up. They are also much more widely available, not only in specialty stores but in supermarkets as well.
FOOD
February 12, 1986 | By BABS SUZANNE HARRISON, Special to the Daily News
Leeks are one of the more elegant members of the onion family. Somewhat like a dashing count, they are plentiful and cheap in Europe but highly thought of and expensive in America. Indeed, they are known in France and Wales as the poor man's asparagus. They have a surprisingly mild and delicate flavor, considering that they are so hearty as to live in the ground all winter, as long as temperature does not drop below 10 degrees. The leek is probably the most versatile of the allium family, which includes onions, garlic, shallots and scallions as well as lilies.
NEWS
October 25, 2013
LEEK & WILD MUSHROOM STUFFING 1 1/2 cups hot water 1/2 ounce dried oyster mushrooms* 1 cup (2 sticks) butter 1 pound fresh shiitake mushrooms, stems removed, caps sliced 1 pound oyster mushrooms, sliced 1 1/2 cups chopped leeks (white and pale green parts only) 6 garlic cloves, chopped 2 cups dry white wine 1 tablespoon chopped fresh thyme 1 1/2 baguettes French bread 1 large egg, beaten to blend Combine 1 1/2 cups hot water and dried oyster mushrooms in small bowl.
FOOD
October 7, 1992 | By Bev Bennett, FOR THE INQUIRER
When making soup, it's sometimes hard to stop adding things. There are so many great end-of-summer and fall vegetables to choose from, that by the time we're done adding to the soup, we've got enough to get us through winter - when our intention just was to cook dinner. The key to making a great, relatively quick soup for two is to focus on one ingredient or flavor to carry the bowl. This time of year, stores are brimming with soup ingredients; leeks, broccoli, onions and potatoes are but a few. The idea is to choose one or two as a soup base.
FOOD
May 28, 2000 | By Aliza Green, FOR THE INQUIRER
It's hard for me to imagine cooking without garlic at any time of the year, but spring is when you get the opportunity to enjoy it in its fresher stages - green garlic and garlic chives available before the head has fully formed. Garlic has had a rocky history, and some people still shy away from this powerful member of the onion family. But the "stinking rose" as it is also known, is indispensable in nearly all the world's cuisines. It is thought to have originated in the deserts of Central Asia.
FOOD
October 1, 2009 | By Sally Schneider, UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE
One of the great pleasures of cooking is being surprised by an ingredient you thought you knew completely. You read a recipe, or an idea pops into your head for handling it a completely different way, and a whole new world of possibilities opens: the cook's eureka moment. Like many people, I viewed leeks as an oniony flavoring for dishes, or as leeks vinaigrette or as a cooked garnish in a stew or sauce; I loved them rubbed with olive oil and roasted in a foil package. Then I bought a bunch of leeks at the farmers' market and it occurred to me to julienne them - cut them into thin strips - to treat them like noodles.
FOOD
November 29, 2012
Keeping up with Han Chiang's Sichuan machine is no small task. No sooner had I eaten at his new Han Dynasty in University City than it was no longer his newest branch, with the recent opening of HD Cherry Hill. The recent dynastic expansion of the fiery chain gives devoted regulars pause. But his West Philly perch in the old MidAtlantic is a step up, style-wise, from his 3-bell Old City lair, both in decor and service. And our food didn't suffer one bit. I even discovered a new favorite, this double-cooked flounder that gets pan-crisped once, then goes into the wok to finish with leeks, hot peppers, funky fermented beans, and a chile oil-peppercorn sauce that brought just the right touch of numbing heat.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 8, 2015
RICH LANDAU and Kate Jacoby, owners and executive chefs of Vedge, provided this recipe for Gene Baur's new book, Living the Farm Sanctuary Life: The Ultimate Guide to Eating Mindfully, Living Longer, and Feeling Better Every Day. Baur writes, "I love this robust 'catch-of-the-day' tomato soup, because here the catch isn't fish, it's wild mushrooms, peas, leeks and fennel. Served with a slice of toasted sourdough bread, this is a compassionate version of a San Francisco classic.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 22, 2015
SMOKED HADDOCK BRANDADE 2 pounds Yukon Gold potatoes 1 pound smoked haddock*, cut into 2-inch pieces 2/3 cup whole milk 1/3 cup olive oil 2 cloves whole garlic 1 bay leaf Salt and pepper to taste Peel and large-dice the potatoes, then place with bay leaf in cold water, just one inch over the top of the potatoes. Bring to a boil and turn the flame down to a medium-high heat. Cook until the potatoes are fully cooked, about 10 to 15 minutes. In a different pot, cook the smoked haddock in the milk until the fish breaks down, about 10 minutes.
FOOD
April 4, 2014 | By Maureen Fitzgerald, Inquirer Food Editor
Even before the others had shed their backpacks and donned their aprons, Nick Rodriguez, 10, was smashing a clove of garlic, slamming his fist on the flat side of a knife, at our second cooking class at Henry Lawton Elementary. Yes, he said, without looking up, he had already peeled it. "Hey! I want a turn!" said Christian McKinney, 11, feeling like he was missing out. "Hang on, guys," I said. While I was thrilled with the enthusiasm and the smashing skill retained from class the week before, I wanted to remind them to read the entire recipe before plowing in. So each took a turn reading part of the instructions for tortelloni minestrone soup (we substituted the smaller tortellini)
NEWS
February 21, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
WHEN RICHARD Leek went to teach at Girard College, he found what many people spend their lives searching for: a fulfilling way to make a difference in others' lives. In this case, the others were students from single-parent and low-income homes, many desperate for the touch of a caring mentor to guide them into challenging lives. Rick, as he was known to family and friends, filled that role as both teacher and coach, not only stimulating young minds but giving his charges pride in their accomplishments.
NEWS
October 25, 2013
LEEK & WILD MUSHROOM STUFFING 1 1/2 cups hot water 1/2 ounce dried oyster mushrooms* 1 cup (2 sticks) butter 1 pound fresh shiitake mushrooms, stems removed, caps sliced 1 pound oyster mushrooms, sliced 1 1/2 cups chopped leeks (white and pale green parts only) 6 garlic cloves, chopped 2 cups dry white wine 1 tablespoon chopped fresh thyme 1 1/2 baguettes French bread 1 large egg, beaten to blend Combine 1 1/2 cups hot water and dried oyster mushrooms in small bowl.
FOOD
November 29, 2012
Keeping up with Han Chiang's Sichuan machine is no small task. No sooner had I eaten at his new Han Dynasty in University City than it was no longer his newest branch, with the recent opening of HD Cherry Hill. The recent dynastic expansion of the fiery chain gives devoted regulars pause. But his West Philly perch in the old MidAtlantic is a step up, style-wise, from his 3-bell Old City lair, both in decor and service. And our food didn't suffer one bit. I even discovered a new favorite, this double-cooked flounder that gets pan-crisped once, then goes into the wok to finish with leeks, hot peppers, funky fermented beans, and a chile oil-peppercorn sauce that brought just the right touch of numbing heat.
FOOD
September 20, 2012
Makes 4 servings 12 small to medium leeks, cleaned, trimmed (about 21/2 pounds) 2 tablespoons white wine vinegar, or mixture of half sherry vinegar and half white wine vinegar 1 tablespoon Düsseldorf mustard 5 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil 1/2 teaspoon salt Freshly ground pepper 2 tablespoons chopped fresh chives 1 tablespoon chopped fresh tarragon or dill 1 package (8...
FOOD
September 22, 2011
Here is an excerpt from Craig LaBan's online chat: Craig LaBan: You all know I love a good, simple farm-market meal, and I scored big this weekend with my first potato-leek soup of the season. Potatoes, leeks, and water are like best friends. Why anyone would ruin this classic French peasant trio with chicken stock or bacon is beyond me. This soup is one of the most sublime examples of simplicity perfected. My version: Potatoes (four large ones, peeled and diced)
FOOD
April 15, 2010 | By Carole Kotkin, McClatchy Newspapers
Though they are members of the onion family and look like overgrown green onions, leeks bring a mellower flavor to Sunday supper. If you've had vichyssoise, the cold potato-and-leek soup, you know just what I mean. In today's recipe, leeks and shallots cooked in white wine and a bit of butter form a bed for seared scallops. Add rice, a green salad, and crusty bread, and your supper is complete.   Scallops and Leeks With White Wine   1. In a large skillet, melt 1 tablespoon butter over low heat.
FOOD
March 4, 2010 | By Anna Herman FOR THE INQUIRER
Even though the popular "spring mix" of greens has become ubiquitous in grocery stores year round, it just seems wrong to rely on it as a main salad ingredient every season of the year - especially in winter. Once, not so long ago, farmers, gardeners and diners waited eagerly for the first tender young leaves of lettuces and other greens to herald spring. Nowadays, modern farming, processing and shipping allows us all to serve clean and ready-cut salad from a bag whenever we please.
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