CollectionsLeftovers
IN THE NEWS

Leftovers

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
February 7, 1995 | by Harriet Lessy, Daily News Staff Writer USA Today and Daily News wire services contributed to this report
You'd think that life would be good for all the beautiful Baldwin boys. But not so, says Billy, younger brother of Alec. Every time he wants to compete for a cool movie role, the name Tom Cruise pops up, he says. "In my age category, there's only Tom Cruise," Baldwin, who was born in '63, told W magazine. "If they don't get Tom Cruise, it's up for grabs for everybody else: Brad Pitt, Keanu Reeves, Billy Baldwin, Matt Dillon, Val Kilmer, or John Cusak. We're all waiting for his leftovers - or maybe smaller pictures that don't have the money or the scope for a Tom Cruise.
NEWS
December 22, 1992 | By Robert Zausner, INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
Pennsylvania is doing something about government waste, though not the kind people often complain about. It is trying to make sure that no food served at state functions goes uneaten. A new administrative directive issued by Gov. Casey requires vendors doing business with the state to make a "good-faith effort" to donate wholesome leftovers to nonprofit groups serving the needy. The order lists specific groups in 35 counties, including Philabundance in Philadelphia, and three organizations in Harrisburg, where the state conducts most of its business.
FOOD
September 3, 1986 | By Gerald Etter, Inquirer Food Writer
Everything But the Kitchen Sink (HPBooks, $7.95) is a practical kitchen guide that attempts to help you solve the problem of what to do with all the leftovers that tend to clutter the refrigerator. It also provides insights into saving dollars on food shopping and points out the practicality of cooking ahead. The softcover book, written by three best-selling food authors - Karine Eliason, Madeline Westover and Nevada Harward - is divided into five chapters: shopping with savings in mind, big-batch cooking, cooking with built-in leftovers, preparing ahead and fitting leftovers into your menu-planning.
FOOD
January 19, 2012 | By Maureen Fitzgerald, Inquirer Food Editor
Here is an excerpt from the blog "My Daughter's Kitchen. " Sometimes, especially after a long day, the most satisfying meal is one that doesn't require a trip to the store. Indeed, everyone needs a few recipes that can be pulled together, even when it seems that there is nothing in the fridge. Or when the few ingredients on hand are nearing their expiration dates. As a lovely package of Baby Bella mushrooms stood out in my nearly empty refrigerator, I thought to myself: frittata.
FOOD
November 23, 2005 | By Marilynn Marter INQUIRER FOOD WRITER
As preparations begin for what is probably the biggest meal of the year, some cooks may already be wondering what to do with the inevitable leftovers. For help in that regard, we talked with several chefs who will be turning out turkeys by the dozens tomorrow. Among the pros, none plans to use leftovers on later menus - with the possible exception of making turkey stock for soup or gravy. In restaurants, where the plan is not to have leftovers, any excess typically becomes the staff dinner, fills "doggie bags," or goes to local food banks or charities, we were told.
FOOD
November 24, 2004 | By Beth D'Addono FOR THE INQUIRER
Leftovers again? Thanksgiving turkey and trimmings can lose their allure after a few days. After all, how many turkey sandwiches can one family eat? But with a dose of creativity borrowed from culinary traditions in other parts of the world, or even other neighborhoods, those leftovers can seem inspired. The trick is to transform the turkey into dishes that have nothing in common with the Thanksgiving feast. "Turkey is so easy to use in all kinds of dishes, just like chicken," said Maximo Baez Berg, a longtime maitre d' and waiter who was born in the Dominican Republic and lives in Center City.
FOOD
July 14, 1993 | By Andrew Schloss, FOR THE INQUIRER
The best way to cook in the summer is to do as little of it as possible. But after we've used up our biweekly pizza delivery and our quota of tuna salads, what then? One way out of the kitchen is to use the barbecue to get a head start on a week's worth of meals that need little more than assembly each night on their way to the table. By starting off with a gala cookout, and by preparing enough food to ensure a small amount of leftovers from each course, we can create the foundation for a whole week's worth of menus.
NEWS
January 19, 1996 | For The Inquirer / ELLEN DIPIAZZA
No, Craig Bennett of Mount Laurel is no member of the Polar Bears, the club that starts each year by diving into ice-cold waters. But there he was yesterday in Moorestown, celebrating the unseasonably warm weather in a T-shirt and clearing away leftovers of last week's blizzard.
FOOD
November 12, 2009
Lock in leftovers These silicone tie wraps are reusable, heat resistant to 482 degrees, and lock in place, so bagged leftovers stay fresh. They're dishwasher safe and come with a five-year warranty. In green only. Save that manicure These gloves let you scrub potatoes and other vegetables while preserving your skin, and your fresh manicure, if company's coming. The rough-textured knitted-nylon gloves rinse clean, and they can also go into the dishwasher or washing machine.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
December 27, 2014 | By Jacqueline Bigar, For The Inquirer
ARIES (March 21-April 19) (sssss) Friday night chill, knowing the good times begin Saturday morning when you become a major force for the next few days. Others are clearly attracted and let you know. Can you diplomatically handle more than one person at one time? This weekend will tell. Enjoy your time. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) (ssss) Whether celebrating that Santa has come and gone, you are ready for a hardy night of partying. Meeting someone proves to be a flashing red light experience.
FOOD
November 27, 2014 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
For many of us, Thanksgiving dinner is all about tradition - re-creating the same, satisfying, gravy-soaked turkey coma we remember from our childhoods. But once the brining, basting, and bingeing of Thanksgiving Day are behind us, well, that's when things get interesting. There's no wrong way to make a Thanksgiving leftover sandwich. But, as some of the region's inventive chefs proved, there are plenty of right ways. We asked the chefs to innovate, and they delivered: turkey-and-stuffing scrapple to cure your tryptophan hangover, open-faced turkey towers served on slabs of stuffing, a Taiwanese-style turkey salad sandwich, and a vegan French dip with a schmear of mashed potato, roasted mushrooms, and gravy.
NEWS
June 27, 2014 | By Ellen Gray
* THE LEFTOVERS. 10 p.m. Sunday, HBO. * RECKLESS. 9 p.m. Sunday, CBS3.   IF DISASTER movies have taught me anything, it's that I'm meant to go in the first wave. It's hard to be scared when you're pretty sure it'll never be you fleeing the aliens/zombies/vampires or fighting amid civil unrest to defend the family castle to the last can of tuna. But what if survival simply meant getting up the day after 2 percent of the population mysteriously vanished? And getting up the day after that and the day after that?
NEWS
May 19, 2013 | By David Hiltbrand, INQUIRER TV CRITIC
Shows that debut on broadcast this time of year, just as the season is ending, are generally remainders. They're series the networks bought and paid for, and then, for one reason or another, had second thoughts about. But this inauspicious out-of-season interval has spawned such significant hits as Seinfeld , Castle , The Office , Northern Exposure , and American Idol . The two shows debuting Monday have, to varying degrees, promising pilots. We'll see if they survive the summer.
FOOD
March 15, 2013 | By Joseph A. Gambardello, Inquirer Staff Writer
Taking home leftovers from a restaurant these days is as American as the apple pie you did not finish for dessert. It was not always so. Anyone who grew up in the '60s and '70s is likely to recall that what you left on your plate at an eatery was carried back to the kitchen, never to be seen again. That is, unless, it was steak or some other hunk of meat. For that, you'd ask for a doggy bag. Recalling my own experiences working at the Pub, the Cherry Hill Inn, and Cherry Hill Lodge while in high school, the routine called for the server to take your plate back to the kitchen and return with a grease-resistant paper sack neatly folded at the top, and what remained of your steak or chicken inside.
FOOD
November 21, 2012 | By Maureen Fitzgerald, INQUIRER FOOD EDITOR
For most families, there's no messing with the Thanksgiving menu. Even the most adventurous cooks cannot part ways with tradition on this holiday. You might be able to jazz things up, but there's no escaping the requisite parts: roasted turkey, mashed potatoes, cranberries, stuffing, and sweet potatoes. But the day after is another story. And with those most basic of building blocks, some of our talented local chefs put together some pretty inventive and tasty sandwiches with the leftovers.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 2012 | BY LARI ROBLING, For the Daily News
SHE'S THE Italian mother we all wish we had - making delicious dishes for friends and family. Her cakes steal the show at bake sales. She's Giovanna Damiani, who grew up in a small area outside Naples, Italy, and came to the United States in 1946. At her recent 90th birthday party, guests spanned four generations and included a friend from Brooklyn, N.Y., whom Damiani had worked with in Italy during World War II. A highlight was the signed Carlos Ruiz T-shirt she received. He's her favorite Phillie.
NEWS
April 12, 2012 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
Consider the forlorn fate of a super PAC that has outlived its political purpose: Once flush with cash in support of a rising Republican candidate trying to dodge Mitt Romney's mallet in this year's primary game of Whac-A-Mole. Now, sitting on a pile of greenbacks, its man beat back into the annals of presidential history and no spending goals in sight. So what happens to the millions collected by such groups on behalf of the Rick Santorums, Rick Perrys, and Jon M. Huntsman Jrs. of this world when these would-be presidents wind down their campaigns?
FOOD
January 19, 2012 | By Maureen Fitzgerald, Inquirer Food Editor
Here is an excerpt from the blog "My Daughter's Kitchen. " Sometimes, especially after a long day, the most satisfying meal is one that doesn't require a trip to the store. Indeed, everyone needs a few recipes that can be pulled together, even when it seems that there is nothing in the fridge. Or when the few ingredients on hand are nearing their expiration dates. As a lovely package of Baby Bella mushrooms stood out in my nearly empty refrigerator, I thought to myself: frittata.
FOOD
November 23, 2011 | By Ashley Primis, Inquirer Staff Writer
Tables across the country will be overflowing with myriad traditions on Thanksgiving Day. Most will have turkeys, some will have ethnic eats such as ravioli, collard greens, or kugel. But there's one thing all the holiday revelers will have in common: Scouring the fridge the next day and gorging on leftovers. "I actually look forward to the leftovers more than the dinner itself," says Peter McAndrews, chef and owner of Philadelphia's Modo Mio, Monsù, and Paesano's. It's a sentiment many hosts would repeat.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|