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Legal Drama

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ENTERTAINMENT
July 24, 1996 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
A Time to Kill begins with the kind of violence and vengeance we expect at the end of an action movie. Unfortunately, the strong opening heralds the beginning of the end for any promise of a truly provocative drama about race and justice. With a running time of close to 2 1/2 hours, Joel Schumacher's second John Grisham adaptation (his first was The Client) seems longer than the O.J. trial. More damagingly, A Time to Kill follows the example of many apartheid films in portraying the wrongs done to a black family from the perspective of a white liberal.
NEWS
October 15, 1989 | By Michael L. Rozansky, Inquirer Staff Writer
They had just finished stirring martinis and were about to celebrate their 15th wedding anniversary when they looked at the mail. There the Abington couple found a notice of a public tax sale that warned in bold print: "Your property is about to be sold without your consent for delinquent taxes. Your property may be sold for a small fraction of its fair market value. " John and Marie Russo couldn't believe it. Montgomery County was threatening to sell their house - the house that Marie's father, a stonemason who immigrated from Italy, bought in 1953 after scrimping for years.
NEWS
September 28, 2012
* MADE IN JERSEY. 9 p.m. Friday, CBS 3. * FRINGE. 9 p.m. Friday, Fox 29. IT TAKES only about two minutes for "Made in Jersey" to get its lead down to her pretty bra. I don't know if that's a record, but it says a lot about how deftly CBS' newest drama handles the introduction of Martina Garetti (Janet Montgomery), Jersey-girl-turned-Manhattan-lawyer, that women should be able to relate to her, even in her undies. I suspect guys will be fine with her, too. Montgomery ("Black Swan")
NEWS
May 24, 2000 | by Nolan Reese, For the Daily News
Lost Girls By Andrew Pyper Delacorte Pree, 385 pages, $23.95 Two missing girls, the teacher accused of murdering them and a young hot-shot lawyer relocating to a small town to defend him. Doesn't really sound like a a ghost story but "Lost Girls," the debut novel by Andrew Pyper, slowly reveals its true colors after first setting itself up as a legal drama. Bartholomew Crane is a coke-snorting, strip club-visiting lawyer whom we meet as he is forcing a key witness to knowingly lie on the stand during a sexual assault trial.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 31, 2008 | By David Hiltbrand INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The new TV season doesn't begin for three weeks. But a number of shows are diving in early, intent on getting a few laps in before the big boys cannonball into the pool. Today we look at a pair of new cable series that are jumping the networks. The better bet is Sons of Anarchy on FX (Wednesdays at 10 p.m.), a shockingly good series about a motorcycle gang in the apocryphal California valley town of Charming. This is the most unusual and engaging family drama since The Sopranos, to which Sons of Anarchy bears certain similarities.
NEWS
April 20, 1994 | Los Angeles Daily News
"L.A. Law" is going to the big courtroom in the sky after eight seasons and 173 episodes, with the announcement yesterday that NBC is canceling the much-decorated legal drama. The winner of 15 Emmys will close out its run with four original episodes that will commence April 28 and lead to a series finale May 19. There was no word on how the show will end, or if there will be any acknowledgment of its conclusion. Since its premiere on Sept. 15, 1986, the creation of Steven Bochco and Terry Louise Fisher has been a critical favorite and an NBC mainstay.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 2012
SO DOES A TV SHOW that's filmed entirely in Philly look different from one that only pretends it's here? We won't be able to see how we look in our latest closeup until NBC's "Do No Harm" premieres in early 2013. Until then, there's always "Hack," the 2002-04 drama starring Philadelphian David Morse and Andre Braugher ("Last Resort"). Its 40 episodes are now available for streaming on Netflix. Also on Netflix (as well as on Amazon Instant Video): Steven Bochco's "Philly," a legal drama starring Roxborough's Kim Delaney that mostly filmed in southern California, on a set with surprisingly realistic City Hall interiors, including one of its massive staircases.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 2, 2010
The big screen isn't the only place where Philadelphia and its environs have played a starring role. Through the decades, television has featured the city in such series as the 1970s sitcoms "Angie" and "The Tony Randall Show"; "Hack," starring David Morse; "Cold Case"; and the legal drama "Philly. " But few set-in-Our-Town programs have shown us more love than the FX cult comedy "It's Always Sunny in Philadelphia," which follows the misadventures of a group of lovable (and not-so-lovable)
NEWS
January 10, 1997 | by Ellen Gray, Daily News Staff Writer
ABC announced yesterday that it will put "NYPD Blue" and "Ellen" on hiatus for two months, beginning in March, in order to launch midseason replacement series, including a sitcom starring Arsenio Hall. Both shows will return in time for May sweeps, the network said. Not so lucky is "Murder One. " The critically acclaimed but little-watched series will leave the air after Jan. 23, which will mark the verdict in the second of the show's three trials this season. That season, likely to be the show's last, will conclude in a three-night, six-hour mini-series scheduled to air April 13, 14 and 17. "Murder One," scheduled against NBC's "Seinfeld," has been regarded as living on borrowed time for much of this season.
NEWS
August 28, 1994 | By Howard Goodman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A memorial service for Robert P. Barnes, 42, of Bala Cynwyd, who died in a car crash Wednesday evening, will be at 2 p.m. today at St. Christopher's Episcopal Church, 226 Righters Mill Rd., Gladwyne. Mr. Barnes, a partner with the Mindlin Co., a metals brokerage, was the passenger in a 1991 Nissan 300 ZX when it collided with another car on Kelly Drive. The crash also caused the deaths of a Queen Village couple, Dale and Leslie Bluebond, both 32, who occupied the second car. The driver of the Nissan, Stuart Wagman, 36, of Havertown, was seriously injured.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 2012
SO DOES A TV SHOW that's filmed entirely in Philly look different from one that only pretends it's here? We won't be able to see how we look in our latest closeup until NBC's "Do No Harm" premieres in early 2013. Until then, there's always "Hack," the 2002-04 drama starring Philadelphian David Morse and Andre Braugher ("Last Resort"). Its 40 episodes are now available for streaming on Netflix. Also on Netflix (as well as on Amazon Instant Video): Steven Bochco's "Philly," a legal drama starring Roxborough's Kim Delaney that mostly filmed in southern California, on a set with surprisingly realistic City Hall interiors, including one of its massive staircases.
NEWS
September 28, 2012
* MADE IN JERSEY. 9 p.m. Friday, CBS 3. * FRINGE. 9 p.m. Friday, Fox 29. IT TAKES only about two minutes for "Made in Jersey" to get its lead down to her pretty bra. I don't know if that's a record, but it says a lot about how deftly CBS' newest drama handles the introduction of Martina Garetti (Janet Montgomery), Jersey-girl-turned-Manhattan-lawyer, that women should be able to relate to her, even in her undies. I suspect guys will be fine with her, too. Montgomery ("Black Swan")
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 2011 | By GARY THOMPSON, thompsg@phillynews.com 215-854-5992
FOR THOSE not hip to L.A. writer Michael Connelly's series of crime books, "The Lincoln Lawyer" refers to a defense attorney who operates out of his limo. The lawyer in question is Mick Haller, who wheels and deals on the freeway as he's ferried to various precinct jails and courtrooms, trying to keep lower-rung biker/dealer clients out of prison. Connelly's lived-in characters have the reportorial feel of observed truth, captured in this gritty adaptation by (Lafayette Hill native)
NEWS
March 17, 2011 | By GARY THOMPSON, thompsg@phillynews.com215-854-5992
FOR THOSE not hip to L.A. writer Michael Connelly's series of crime books, "The Lincoln Lawyer" refers to a defense attorney who operates out of his limo. The lawyer in question is Micky Haller, who wheels and deals on the freeway as he's ferried to various precinct jails and courtrooms, trying to keep lower-rung biker/dealer clients out of prison. Connelly's lived-in characters have the reportorial feel of observed truth, captured in this gritty adaptation by (Lafayette Hill native)
ENTERTAINMENT
August 2, 2010
The big screen isn't the only place where Philadelphia and its environs have played a starring role. Through the decades, television has featured the city in such series as the 1970s sitcoms "Angie" and "The Tony Randall Show"; "Hack," starring David Morse; "Cold Case"; and the legal drama "Philly. " But few set-in-Our-Town programs have shown us more love than the FX cult comedy "It's Always Sunny in Philadelphia," which follows the misadventures of a group of lovable (and not-so-lovable)
NEWS
May 19, 2010 | By Jonathan Storm, Inquirer Columnist
ABC announced the Television Actors Employment Act on Tuesday, a fall schedule with six new series and more than a dozen well-known TV names. Dana Delany (late of Desperate Housewives ) and Jeri Ryan ( Star Trek 's good old Seven of Nine) star in the crime drama Body of Proof . The Sopranos ' Michael Imperioli and NYPD Blue 's James McDaniel are featured in a cop show set in Detroit. Michael Chiklis ( The Shield ), Julie Benz ( Dexter ), and Tate Donovan ( Damages )
ENTERTAINMENT
August 31, 2008 | By David Hiltbrand INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The new TV season doesn't begin for three weeks. But a number of shows are diving in early, intent on getting a few laps in before the big boys cannonball into the pool. Today we look at a pair of new cable series that are jumping the networks. The better bet is Sons of Anarchy on FX (Wednesdays at 10 p.m.), a shockingly good series about a motorcycle gang in the apocryphal California valley town of Charming. This is the most unusual and engaging family drama since The Sopranos, to which Sons of Anarchy bears certain similarities.
NEWS
February 19, 2008 | By Tirdad Derakhshani INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The FX drama Damages has been hailed as one of the most exciting, sexy legal thrillers since ABC's short-lived '90s masterpiece Murder One. In a TV landscape overstuffed with legal dramas, Damages also is a breath of fresh air: Its first season, recently released on DVD (Sony; $49.95; not rated), contains not one courtroom scene. (Season one is all viewers will have for a while. Production on the second season has been pushed back by the writers strike.) While the show features all the requisite sex, opulence, and murderous plots we've come to expect from the cable network that brought us Nip/Tuck and The Shield, it also features one of the most exquisitely plotted and insightful explorations of morality anywhere in contemporary drama.
NEWS
June 3, 2007 | By Alison Gray FOR THE INQUIRER
Every profession has its "rock stars. " For techies, Bill Gates and Steve Jobs fire up the neurons. For architects, Frank Lloyd Wright draws out the creative spirit. For food experts, Julia Child and Nigella Lawson get the juices flowing. And for lawyers, it's a motley crew of characters fondly known as the Supremes - as in Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. and the eight associate justices. If you are going to Washington and want to see the cream of the legal crop perform their spirited and intense battle of wit and wisdom with talented advocates for the rich and poor, the famous and unknown, the public and private, head to the U.S. Supreme Court on a Monday, Tuesday or Wednesday between the first Monday in October and late April.
BUSINESS
March 28, 2005 | By Porus P. Cooper INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Merck & Co. Inc.'s top staff lawyer, Kenneth C. Frazier, brings an unusual resume to the job of fighting the hundreds of lawsuits filed over Vioxx, the painkiller it withdrew from the market because it was implicated in heart attacks. Frazier once battled to prove the innocence of an Alabama death-row inmate. He's also one of a handful of African Americans at the head of the legal departments of Fortune 500 companies. There are just 20, according to the Minority Corporate Counsel Association.
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