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Legal Education

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NEWS
November 11, 1995 | By Andy Wallace, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Paul A. Wolkin, 78, a leader in the development of continuing legal education, died Thursday of a malignant brain tumor at his home in Center City. He lived for many years in Overbrook. Mr. Wolkin was executive vice president of the American Law Institute from 1977 to 1992, when he retired. Beginning in 1963, he was executive director of the Committee on Continuing Professional Education, a joint effort of the American Bar Association and the American Law Institute. "If one man was ever the heart of an organization, it was you at ALI," Patricia M. Wald, judge of the U.S. Court of Appeals, told him during a dedication of the institute's Paul L. Wolkin Conference Center in October.
NEWS
September 19, 2014 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
In one of the largest gifts ever to a U.S. law school, Drexel University said Wednesday that Philadelphia trial lawyer Thomas R. Kline would give the eight-year-old school $50 million to bolster its effort to reach the top ranks of legal education. Drexel president John A. Fry said the money would be used to fund scholarships, add faculty, and expand the law school's trial-advocacy program, which provides training for lawyers who plan to focus on courtroom practice. Included in the gift is the former Beneficial Saving Fund Society building at 12th and Chestnut Streets, an imposing Classical Revival-style structure that has been vacant since 2001 and that will house the law school's Institute for Trial Advocacy.
BUSINESS
July 23, 2012 | Chris Mondics
When the legal markets imploded in 2008, and law firms started to ratchet back on hiring first-year associates and filling summer classes, it wasn't at all apparent that law schools, too, would need to tighten their belts. Some law-school administrators bravely claimed that while it was true there were fewer legal jobs, the potential uses of a law degree were so varied that graduates would find a way to land somewhere. There was, at the same time, the hope that the job-market troubles would be temporary, that the economy would revive and things would return to normal.
NEWS
January 10, 1994
Attorneys have been doing a lot of complaining about "lawyer bashing" lately in beer ads and comedy routines, but it has been our observation that no one can bash lawyers like other lawyers. The current issue of Philadelphia Lawyer contains an article on "What Lawyers Really Think" about the current requirement that each lawyer undergo five hours of "continuing legal education" annually in legal ethics. One respondent to the survey said, "Requiring a knave to listen to five hours of lectures on ethics per year will give you a bored knave, not an honest attorney.
NEWS
October 6, 1992 | By Emilie Lounsberry and Susan Caba, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
In the shadow of a huge stuffed elephant, above the beat of New Age music and amid a sea of well-dressed men and women sipping drinks, weary lawyers were singing the same melody: There's more to life than ethics. Such was the lament after the first full day of continuing legal-education classes Friday at the Philadelphia Bar Association's conference in Washington - an annual event where lawyers and judges get to rub elbows, dine on good food and go to neat places. But if past conferences seemed like junkets, this year's event was real work: It marked the first time that lawyers could take classes toward the five hours of continuing legal education that were mandated this year by the state Supreme Court.
NEWS
May 27, 1993 | BY BRUCE W. KAUFFMAN
No one could agree more than I with the central theme of the May 21 column authored by John M. Baer - the judiciary of Pennsylvania is in desperate need of dramatic reform. Nevertheless, in all fairness, we must be careful not to paint with too broad a brush. We must not lose sight of the fact that there are many hard-working men and women of unquestioned integrity and ability performing a critical public service within the judiciary each and every day, at great personal sacrifice. They should neither be tarnished nor discouraged by the acknowledged need for reform of the system.
NEWS
April 3, 2014 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
District Attorney Seth Williams on Tuesday led the first of a series of forums to improve relations between law enforcement and the lesbian and gay community in Philadelphia. The focus of the forum, held at the District Attorney's Office, was safety and crime prevention, but it reflected a trend in law enforcement to better serve and be sensitive to the LGBT (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender) community. The Police Department recently established a policy to be more respectful to people who are transgendered.
NEWS
September 22, 2012
Joshua Morse 3d, 89, who as dean of the University of Mississippi School of Law in the 1960s defied segregationist tradition by admitting the school's first black students, a move that led to the desegregation of Mississippi's legal profession and judiciary, died Friday at his home in Tallahassee, Fla., his family announced. In a time of civil rights marches and often violent racial strife in the Deep South, Mr. Morse challenged prejudice and parochialism by fostering a markedly progressive period at the school.
NEWS
March 1, 2013 | By Jonathan Lai, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
NEWARK, N.J. - Rutgers University is exploring a plan to merge its two law schools by 2014, president Robert L. Barchi announced Thursday at a board of governors meeting. The separately accredited schools in Newark and Camden would combine under one Rutgers banner, with a single faculty, student body, and admissions process. Faculties at both schools voted unanimously in late January to support the idea. "I strongly and heartily support to move forward with a concept that would bring the law schools at Rutgers together," Barchi told the board Thursday.
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NEWS
September 19, 2014 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
In one of the largest gifts ever to a U.S. law school, Drexel University said Wednesday that Philadelphia trial lawyer Thomas R. Kline would give the eight-year-old school $50 million to bolster its effort to reach the top ranks of legal education. Drexel president John A. Fry said the money would be used to fund scholarships, add faculty, and expand the law school's trial-advocacy program, which provides training for lawyers who plan to focus on courtroom practice. Included in the gift is the former Beneficial Saving Fund Society building at 12th and Chestnut Streets, an imposing Classical Revival-style structure that has been vacant since 2001 and that will house the law school's Institute for Trial Advocacy.
NEWS
April 28, 2014 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
CAMDEN When Phoebe Haddon decided her Temple law students needed a better understanding of the complex legal history of inequality, she set about creating her own course. "It came out of a conversation we'd been having for a while: That our students didn't have a strong sense of history in terms of race relations and inequality issues," said Theresa Glennon, a professor at Temple's Beasley School of Law who helped start "Seminar on Race and Ethnicity: Law, History, and Equality. " "We created all the materials ourselves, so it was really great to work with her on that," Glennon said.
NEWS
April 3, 2014 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
District Attorney Seth Williams on Tuesday led the first of a series of forums to improve relations between law enforcement and the lesbian and gay community in Philadelphia. The focus of the forum, held at the District Attorney's Office, was safety and crime prevention, but it reflected a trend in law enforcement to better serve and be sensitive to the LGBT (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender) community. The Police Department recently established a policy to be more respectful to people who are transgendered.
NEWS
March 12, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
G. Bradley Rainer, 66, a respected Center City lawyer and a teacher at Temple University School of Law, died Wednesday, March 5, of cancer at his home in Philadelphia. Mr. Rainer was known as a man who was whip-smart and honest, but also genial and unassuming. Secretaries liked to field his calls, reporting that "G. Brad" was on the line. His specialty was estate and trust work, although he also practiced business law in the six years he was a partner with Reger Rizzo & Darnall L.L.P.
NEWS
July 18, 2013 | By John Mooney, NJ SPOTLIGHT
New Jersey educators are getting lessons in police interrogation techniques and how to tell whether someone is lying - even if they are only in elementary school - as the stakes have increased in the crackdown on bullying. More than 500 teachers, counselors, and administrators completed training sessions this spring with state and outside experts - including a state police sergeant - that included detailed investigation and "interview" techniques. (One suggestion: Never say interrogation .)
NEWS
May 20, 2013 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
As a female student in the male-dominated law school culture of the early 1970s, Eve Biskind Klothen had such a terrible time that she figured she would leave, go into public-interest law, and never return to academia. She could not have expected that she would join Rutgers School of Law-Camden, she says, serving as assistant dean for pro bono and public-interest programs. Klothen, 62, will retire in June after 11 years overseeing a pro bono program that has expanded and become, colleagues say, an expected and important part of students' experience.
NEWS
March 7, 2013
Can't rewrite voting rights history How dare Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia characterize the Voting Rights Act of 1965 as a racial entitlement? If voting, the most fundamental and central right in our democracy, can be described as an entitlement, then it's an American entitlement granted to all citizens ("Voting rights are still vulnerable," Feb. 28). The racial aspects of the Voting Rights Act arise entirely from the concerted efforts of states to deny that American entitlement solely on the basis of race - not on the wishes of the federal government to bestow extra rights upon minorities.
NEWS
March 2, 2013 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
NEWARK, N.J. - Rutgers University is exploring a plan to merge its two law schools by 2014, president Robert L. Barchi announced Thursday at a board of governors meeting. The separately accredited schools in Newark and Camden would combine under one Rutgers banner, with a single faculty, student body, and admissions process. Faculties at both schools voted unanimously in late January to support the idea. "I strongly and heartily support to move forward with a concept that would bring the law schools at Rutgers together," Barchi told the board Thursday.
BUSINESS
December 5, 2012 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
Kathleen Wilkinson has made a career litigating disputes over matters as varied as employment law and construction accidents. Now she is about to take over as chancellor of the 13,000-member Philadelphia Bar Association, a task that arguably is as demanding as representing a corporate client in a high-stakes lawsuit. But, given the complexity of Philadelphia's legal community, it is also a role that requires a measure of political skill. Wilkinson, who will give her inaugural address Tuesday at the bar association's annual meeting and luncheon, says fast-paced changes in the legal profession have imposed a changed agenda on the group.
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