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NEWS
November 21, 2014 | By Ben Finley, Inquirer Staff Writer
To the end, Raghunandan Yandamuri wouldn't say he did it. A Montgomery County Court judge on Thursday sentenced Yandamuri to death for the 2012 murder of a baby and her grandmother during a failed kidnapping plot in King of Prussia. When given a chance to speak, Yandamuri remained unemotional, defiant, and at odds with his court-appointed attorneys, just as he was during his trial. He offered a rambling and sometimes nonsensical allocution that included an apology to the victims for their deaths, but not at his hands.
NEWS
March 30, 2011 | Associated Press
WHITE PLAINS, N.Y. - A jeweler was sentenced yesterday to at least 25 years in prison for incinerating his wife in an oil drum, but not before he called the judge prejudiced, the prosecutor incompetent and his wife's family and friends a "lynch mob. " At an extraordinary sentencing in Westchester County Court, Werner Lippe said he was convicted on "assumptions, speculations and lies. " Reading from handwritten notes on a legal pad, and quoting from U.S. Supreme Court decisions, the combative convict said he should not have been found guilty because his three recorded confessions were involuntary and there was no other evidence.
NEWS
February 14, 1990 | By David M. Krakow, Special to The Inquirer
Before the Geography Bee kicked off at Thomas Harrington Middle School in Mount Laurel, contestant Jeff Naumowitz had the look of a champion. As he sat with 10 other sixth, seventh and eighth graders from Harrington, the 13-year-old was conspicuous in his San Francisco 49ers sweatshirt. The 49ers know a little about winning, having crammed four Super Bowl titles into the last eight years, including their most recent last month. By the time the bee ended Thursday, Jeff stood above the crowd, too. Fending off questions the way Joe Montana fends off would-be sackers, Jeff tackled the competition.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 1989 | By Barbara Beck, Daily News Staff Writer
CBS News Washington correspondent Bob Schieffer remembers the time he was assigned to watch President Reagan get in his helicopter for a weekend at Camp David. "Reagan got on the helicopter, turned to the people on the right and waved. He paused and then would turn to the people on the left. He would wave, and then hold that pose. And I realized standing there that he was pausing so photographers could capture each pose. He simply had this tremendous ability to always be on. In the end he was an actor, and he had remembered what he had learned in the movies.
NEWS
May 15, 2008 | By John H. Kennedy
Occasionally, a distinctive racket shatters the peace and quiet in my ivory tower. Oddly, I relish it. Down a hallway and around a corner from my faculty office at Rosemont College comes a burst of rhythmic taps and snaps and a periodic ring. The outburst puzzles new students, for the sounds are virtually unrecognizable to them. Then they turn that corner and see my colleague, Timothy O'Hara, an associate professor of English, laboring away on his manual typewriter. He is among the last of the faculty here whose preferred instrument of communication is a Smith-Corona, not a Dell or a Mac. (One other faculty member has no computer in his office, and no typewriter either.
SPORTS
September 28, 2009 | By Pete Schnatz FOR THE INQUIRER
As a light rain fell and jet engines worked feverishly to dry the track next door at Dover International Speedway, Chuck Priestley and four racing buddies from Havertown took refuge inside the new sports book at Dover Downs Hotel & Casino. Twenty minutes before the Eagles and other NFL teams kicked off yesterday on the oversize, high-definition televisions lining the tall walls of the $5 million bar and lounge, Priestley glanced quizzically at a card - roughly the size of a legal pad - containing pro football point spreads.
NEWS
February 2, 2007 | By Nancy Phillips INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Ellen Robb, who was bludgeoned to death in the kitchen of her Upper Merion home, was likely killed with a crowbar taken from her garage and wielded by her husband, authorities said yesterday. University of Pennsylvania professor Rafael Robb was ordered yesterday to stand trial on murder charges after prosecutors sketched out what they acknowledge is a wholly circumstantial case against him. They contend that Robb pummeled his wife beyond recognition Dec. 22 because he feared the financial impact of a looming divorce.
SPORTS
July 13, 1990 | By Michael Bamberger, Inquirer Staff Writer
William Yale Giles, the fatherly, white-haired, chain-smoking, gentle- speaking president of the Phillies, leaned forward in the enormous leather desk chair in his enormous office in the innards of Veterans Stadium. In front of him was a huge mahogany desk, practically clear, save for a yellow legal pad. Behind him was an oil portrait of his father, the late Warren Giles, the former National League president. In this baronial setting, Bill Giles, lifelong baseball man, was talking about the new definition of his role.
SPORTS
June 25, 1997 | by Paul Hagen, Daily News Sports Writer
Outside, under a bright and dawning sun, the cleaning crews worked to prepare Veterans Stadium for another game. Most of the Phillies' employees had not yet arrived for work when the large black sedan pulled up outside the entrance to the executive offices. Bill Giles, who had remained incommunicado to the outside world since the bombshell announcement Friday that he was stepping aside as president of the struggling Phillies franchise, stepped out of his car shortly before 8:30 yesterday morning, greeted the security guard and took the elevator to his office on the 400 level.
NEWS
January 21, 1986 | By Murray Dubin, Inquirer Staff Writer
After the singing introduction of Roger Hedgecock Talks to You, the former mayor of San Diego, now a convicted felon, began a new career yesterday as a radio talk-show host. Hedgecock's old career fell by the wayside last month when he resigned after being denied a new trial in the wake of his October conviction on 13 counts of perjury and conspiracy involving campaign-financing violations. Hedgecock, 39, who as mayor was known for his calm and control, was unflappable yesterday despite a bad cold and a guest who arrived late.
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NEWS
November 21, 2014 | By Ben Finley, Inquirer Staff Writer
To the end, Raghunandan Yandamuri wouldn't say he did it. A Montgomery County Court judge on Thursday sentenced Yandamuri to death for the 2012 murder of a baby and her grandmother during a failed kidnapping plot in King of Prussia. When given a chance to speak, Yandamuri remained unemotional, defiant, and at odds with his court-appointed attorneys, just as he was during his trial. He offered a rambling and sometimes nonsensical allocution that included an apology to the victims for their deaths, but not at his hands.
NEWS
March 30, 2011 | Associated Press
WHITE PLAINS, N.Y. - A jeweler was sentenced yesterday to at least 25 years in prison for incinerating his wife in an oil drum, but not before he called the judge prejudiced, the prosecutor incompetent and his wife's family and friends a "lynch mob. " At an extraordinary sentencing in Westchester County Court, Werner Lippe said he was convicted on "assumptions, speculations and lies. " Reading from handwritten notes on a legal pad, and quoting from U.S. Supreme Court decisions, the combative convict said he should not have been found guilty because his three recorded confessions were involuntary and there was no other evidence.
SPORTS
December 8, 2009
HE SIGNED autographs. He knelt at center court and kissed the 76ers logo. Sixers general manager Ed Stefanski had filled a legal pad of requirements for Philly's prodigal son, but it's hard to believe that pregame meet-and-greets and worshipping the ground that Allen Iverson once again walked and ran on were part of it. No, this was his own contribution to this do-over, a chance for him to restart and redesign himself in a place that has always...
SPORTS
September 28, 2009 | By Pete Schnatz FOR THE INQUIRER
As a light rain fell and jet engines worked feverishly to dry the track next door at Dover International Speedway, Chuck Priestley and four racing buddies from Havertown took refuge inside the new sports book at Dover Downs Hotel & Casino. Twenty minutes before the Eagles and other NFL teams kicked off yesterday on the oversize, high-definition televisions lining the tall walls of the $5 million bar and lounge, Priestley glanced quizzically at a card - roughly the size of a legal pad - containing pro football point spreads.
NEWS
May 15, 2008 | By John H. Kennedy
Occasionally, a distinctive racket shatters the peace and quiet in my ivory tower. Oddly, I relish it. Down a hallway and around a corner from my faculty office at Rosemont College comes a burst of rhythmic taps and snaps and a periodic ring. The outburst puzzles new students, for the sounds are virtually unrecognizable to them. Then they turn that corner and see my colleague, Timothy O'Hara, an associate professor of English, laboring away on his manual typewriter. He is among the last of the faculty here whose preferred instrument of communication is a Smith-Corona, not a Dell or a Mac. (One other faculty member has no computer in his office, and no typewriter either.
NEWS
February 2, 2007 | By Nancy Phillips INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Ellen Robb, who was bludgeoned to death in the kitchen of her Upper Merion home, was likely killed with a crowbar taken from her garage and wielded by her husband, authorities said yesterday. University of Pennsylvania professor Rafael Robb was ordered yesterday to stand trial on murder charges after prosecutors sketched out what they acknowledge is a wholly circumstantial case against him. They contend that Robb pummeled his wife beyond recognition Dec. 22 because he feared the financial impact of a looming divorce.
NEWS
September 22, 2001 | By Jackie Koszczuk INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Presidential speechwriter Michael Gerson once described his job as fairly workaday, except for those infrequent occasions when he can sense that his scratchings on yellow legal paper may be bound for history. There may even come a day, Gerson said, "when you are writing for the angels. For some great and decisive moment. " For the 37-year-old son of an ice cream maker, that moment came Thursday night. In what was arguably the most important speech of George W. Bush's presidency, Gerson managed to convey in words precisely what the nation wanted to hear, by most analyses.
NEWS
January 8, 1999 | By David Finkle
Impartial justice? Hmmm. That's what 100 U.S. senators have just sworn to pursue in the trial of Bill Clinton. What I want to know is this: Will these five-score men and women abide by their pledge, or have they exposed themselves - as the President they're trying has done - to charges of lying under oath? Yesterday was historic. No doubt. It's not every day that members of the House are invited into the Senate chamber, and yet there 10 of them were, gathered to present the two vaunted articles of impeachment.
SPORTS
June 25, 1997 | by Paul Hagen, Daily News Sports Writer
Outside, under a bright and dawning sun, the cleaning crews worked to prepare Veterans Stadium for another game. Most of the Phillies' employees had not yet arrived for work when the large black sedan pulled up outside the entrance to the executive offices. Bill Giles, who had remained incommunicado to the outside world since the bombshell announcement Friday that he was stepping aside as president of the struggling Phillies franchise, stepped out of his car shortly before 8:30 yesterday morning, greeted the security guard and took the elevator to his office on the 400 level.
LIVING
May 5, 1994 | By David O'Reilly, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
But our machines have now been running seventy or eighty years, and we must expect that, worn as they are, here a pivot, there a wheel, now a pinion, next a spring, will be giving way; and however we may tinker them up for a while, all will at length surcease motion. - Thomas Jefferson, at 71, in a letter to 78-year-old John Adams The critics are praising his book. Passersby recognize him in airports, and the royalties on his national bestseller, How We Die, promise to pay the college bills for his son and daughter.
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