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Legal Residency

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NEWS
August 7, 1990 | By Kathy Brennan and Darryl Lynette Figueroa, Daily News Staff Writers
Night and day, a dozen or so people sit on a corner at Callowhill and 16th streets, caught somewhere between the First and the Third World. The people, many of them impoverished immigrants from the Dominican Republic, are camping out in front of the Immigration and Naturalization Service office waiting to apply for legal residency under a loophole recently added to a 1986 amnesty program. As established by Congress, the program made undocumented residents who moved to the United States before 1982 eligible for legal residency status, so long as they did not leave the country after their arrival.
NEWS
April 28, 2001 | By Jonathan Gelb and Monica Rhor INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
For years, Dorine Gono of Liberia was afraid to tell anyone that she had only temporary permission to be in the United States. Sergio Carmona of Kennett Square was turned back by the U.S. border patrol three times before he crossed from Mexico in 1984 by wading - up to his neck - across the Rio Grande, all the time worried that he would still end up being deported. A U.S. immigration law passed last year may offer relief from the fears and instability that they and millions of others here illegally or on temporary visas live with.
NEWS
August 8, 1990 | By Robin Palley, Daily News Staff Writer
Officials of the Immigration and Naturalization Service say there is little they can do to ease the plight of the immigrants who stand in line outside the Philadelphia office day and night, seeking legalization interviews. Lyle Karn, district director of the INS, said the dozen or so people who are camping outside, hoping to apply for legal U.S. residency, must wait behind those who have already scheduled appointments - often months in advance. "We can't just give the people outside appointments to come in and be interviewed because we don't know who will be calling in sick, how many of my staff will be available to do interviews, and how many people who have scheduled interviews will cancel each day," Karn said.
NEWS
October 2, 1994 | By Loretta Tofani, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Six-year-old Hai Hotak remembers the day in April when Hong Kong immigration officials wrestled him from his mother's arms and deported him to China, where he now lives with strangers. He and his mother were in Hong Kong's immigration office at the time. "Suddenly, a group of people came and pulled us apart," the boy said in his light voice as he sat on the floor of a dingy apartment among a family he first met in April. "My mother started crying. " Across the border, in Hong Kong, his parents sat recently on the bunk bed of their tiny apartment in a government-subsidized housing compound.
NEWS
May 1, 2009
Children who grew up in the same neighborhoods and went to the same schools may pay more than their classmates to go to college, if they came to this country illegally. That may sound fair. But, for the nation, it's a case of cutting off your nose to spite your face. These children of illegal immigrants are going to stay in this country. It is best that they become well-educated, gainfully employed, and able to give back to American society. Some of these kids are top scholars.
NEWS
May 16, 2011
President Obama has finally put comprehensive immigration reform on a front burner. With at least 11 million undocumented immigrants in this country, it's about time. It won't be an easy task to accomplish, but there is reason to hope immigration won't be saddled with the same level of partisan fighting that birthed a health-care reform package that left everyone wishing for more, or less. Republicans and Democrats have pushed for new immigration rules for more than a decade. Congress has come close.
NEWS
September 20, 2007 | By Jeff Gammage INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The husband of an undocumented Chinese immigrant who miscarried twins during a deportation attempt last year probably will be allowed to stay in the country permanently, his attorney said yesterday. New York lawyer Theodore Cox said federal authorities had moved the case of Philadelphia resident Tian Xiao Zhang, 36, from immigration court to an administrative track. Instead of having to argue his own case for political asylum, Zhang will be considered the spouse of a woman already granted legal residency.
NEWS
June 18, 1986 | By JUAN GONZALEZ and EDWARD MORAN, Daily News Staff Writers
Police Commissioner Kevin M. Tucker has two weeks to find a place to live in this town, city Solicitor Handsel Minyard has ruled. Tucker, appointed commissioner Jan. 2, had asked Mayor Goode to grant him an extension on a city charter rule requiring non-civil service employees to move to Philadelphia within six months of their hiring. City Councilman John Street had requested a legal ruling on whether the charter allowed extensions. But Minyard ruled Monday that Tucker, who lives in Medford, N.J., with his wife and four children, must have a legal residence in the city by July 2. Citing two parts of Section 3-306 of the charter, the solicitor wrote that the paragraphs "leave no room for deviation" and that the six-month limit "must be met and cannot be extended.
NEWS
July 28, 2009 | By Barbara Boyer INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The New Jersey Supreme Court yesterday overturned the conviction of a legal U.S. immigrant deported from Camden to the Dominican Republic after he admitted that he repeatedly sexually assaulted his teenage neighbor. Attorneys successfully argued that Jose Nunez-Valdez had not been properly warned that by pleading guilty in 1998, he faced deportation. The judges tossed out the plea, and the case of Nunez-Valdez, who was deported in 2002, may now go to trial. "This is a big case," said Jason Laughlin, a spokesman for the Camden County Prosecutor's Office.
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NEWS
January 29, 2013
No one knows who came up with the idiom "Wake up and smell the coffee. " Advice columnist Ann Landers is often given credit. It became a memorable line from the movie Ferris Bueller's Day Off . And the Cranberries had an album and a song with that title years ago. In any case, waking up and smelling the coffee appears to be just what the Republican Party is finally doing in regard to immigration reform. A group of Republican senators has joined Democrats to produce the framework for legislation they expect to introduce by March and get through the House later this year.
NEWS
July 28, 2009 | By Barbara Boyer INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The New Jersey Supreme Court yesterday overturned the conviction of a legal U.S. immigrant deported from Camden to the Dominican Republic after he admitted that he repeatedly sexually assaulted his teenage neighbor. Attorneys successfully argued that Jose Nunez-Valdez had not been properly warned that by pleading guilty in 1998, he faced deportation. The judges tossed out the plea, and the case of Nunez-Valdez, who was deported in 2002, may now go to trial. "This is a big case," said Jason Laughlin, a spokesman for the Camden County Prosecutor's Office.
NEWS
May 1, 2009
Children who grew up in the same neighborhoods and went to the same schools may pay more than their classmates to go to college, if they came to this country illegally. That may sound fair. But, for the nation, it's a case of cutting off your nose to spite your face. These children of illegal immigrants are going to stay in this country. It is best that they become well-educated, gainfully employed, and able to give back to American society. Some of these kids are top scholars.
NEWS
February 4, 2008 | By Kevin Cullen
Eddie Treacy lived in the shadows and died in his bed, the covers pulled up, his lungs full of fluid. He was 33 years old, and there is no other way to say this: He died too young. He emigrated to Dorchester, Mass., eight years ago from Athenry, in County Galway, part of what could be the last great wave of the young Irish to come here. Boston is still Irish enough for a guy like Eddie Treacy to fit in. There's always enough work, and there are Gaelic games in Canton on the weekends and fresh brown bread every day at Greenhills Bakery in Adams Village.
NEWS
September 20, 2007 | By Jeff Gammage INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The husband of an undocumented Chinese immigrant who miscarried twins during a deportation attempt last year probably will be allowed to stay in the country permanently, his attorney said yesterday. New York lawyer Theodore Cox said federal authorities had moved the case of Philadelphia resident Tian Xiao Zhang, 36, from immigration court to an administrative track. Instead of having to argue his own case for political asylum, Zhang will be considered the spouse of a woman already granted legal residency.
NEWS
March 29, 2007 | By Steve Chapman
The city government of Hazleton, Pa., got in trouble when it passed a law intended to drive out illegal immigrants. The American Civil Liberties Union sued to overturn the ordinance, arguing that it is the proper task of the federal government, not municipalities, to enforce immigration laws. But when good remedies are absent, it's no surprise to see bad ones emerge. The ordinance says landlords may not rent to illegal immigrants, employers may not hire them, and merchants may not sell to them - with stiff penalties for violators.
NEWS
March 24, 2006 | By Jason Jaewan Lee
There are no such things as illegal immigrants, just illegal institutions and laws. It is ironic that much of the history of this nation of immigrants reflects hostility toward immigrants: the Nationality Act of 1790, which made citizenship available to only free white people; the 1882 Chinese Exclusion Act, which barred immigration of Chinese for 10 years; the failure to accept refugees from Hitler's Germany; and the relocation of Japanese Americans...
NEWS
April 28, 2001 | By Jonathan Gelb and Monica Rhor INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
For years, Dorine Gono of Liberia was afraid to tell anyone that she had only temporary permission to be in the United States. Sergio Carmona of Kennett Square was turned back by the U.S. border patrol three times before he crossed from Mexico in 1984 by wading - up to his neck - across the Rio Grande, all the time worried that he would still end up being deported. A U.S. immigration law passed last year may offer relief from the fears and instability that they and millions of others here illegally or on temporary visas live with.
NEWS
August 11, 1999 | By Gaiutra Bahadur, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
For the last three decades, an ordinance has allowed officials here to deny taxi licenses to legal immigrants who are not U.S. citizens. At a meeting tonight, the Borough Council is expected to remove the restriction. It was passed in 1969, when the PATCO High-Speed Line to Philadelphia was built, making the borough a magnet for taxis. "Government is acting in the appropriate way to make sure the rules are applied fairly across the board," said John Kearney, the borough's solicitor.
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