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NEWS
February 15, 2013
American philosopher and constitutional law expert Ronald Dworkin, 81, a liberal scholar who argued that the law should be founded on moral integrity, died of leukemia Thursday in London, his family said. Mr. Dworkin was a professor of law at New York University and emeritus professor at University College London. He was one of the best known and most quoted legal scholars in the United States and was also an expert on British law. Mr. Dworkin was best known for the idea that the most important virtue the law can display is integrity - understood as the moral idea that the state should act on principle so each member of the community is treated as an equal.
NEWS
May 11, 2010 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mattei Ion Radu, 28, of Radnor, a legal scholar, died of complications from asthma and heart disease Friday, May 7, in New York City after dining with friends. Mr. Radu was to receive a master's degree in law from New York University later this month. He earned a bachelor's degree and a law degree from Villanova University and a master's degree in international history from the London School of Economics. From 2007 to 2009, he taught history and jurisprudence at Villanova. He wrote articles on topics including the Soviet Union, the Cold War, and post-World War II German constitutional law, and they were published in the Villanova Law Review, the Southern University Law Review, the Campbell Law Review, and the University of St. Thomas Journal of Law & Public Policy.
NEWS
June 18, 1986 | By SUSAN BENNETT, Daily News Staff Writer
Antonin Scalia, a Trenton native who would be the first Italian-American to sit on the U.S. Supreme Court, is considered appropriately disinterested on the bench and completely uninterested in politics, and, as a child, was interested in just about everything. The 50-year-old federal judge, who would become the youngest Supreme Court justice if confirmed by the Senate, is "a legal scholar of the first rank," said Sherman Cohn, a professor of law at Georgetown University, where Scalia received his undergraduate degree and later taught as a visiting professor.
NEWS
November 18, 2011 | By MARCI A. HAMILTON
N OW THAT Jerry Sandusky has given an interview to Bob Costas at NBC in which declared his innocence but acknowledged that he "horsed around with kids . . . showered [with them] after workouts . . . hugged them . . . ," comparisons with the now-late Michael Jackson cannot be ignored. Indeed, in his infamous 2003 interview with "60 Minutes," the King of Pop defended sleeping with children in his bed. "Why can't you share your bed?" Jackson asked the interviewer. "The most loving thing to do is share your bed with someone.
NEWS
May 11, 2010 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Mattei Ion Radu, 28, of Radnor, a legal scholar, died of complications from asthma and heart disease Friday, May 7, in New York City after dining with friends. Mr. Radu was to receive a master's degree in law from New York University later this month. He earned a bachelor's degree and a law degree from Villanova University and a master's degree in international history from the London School of Economics. From 2007 to 2009, he taught history and jurisprudence at Villanova.
NEWS
July 30, 2001
IT DOES NOT take a legal scholar to see through government witnesses' fabrications at the Merlino trial. And it does not take wisdom to see the seeds of vindictiveness carried by the prosecutors of this persecution mission, amounting to no more than political prostitution for the sake of a courtroom victory. As long as the U.S. Attorney's office has the power to play "Let's Make a Deal" with any felon trying to shave time off a sentence, the government will be allowed to sculpture indictments exactly the way it chooses, while creating overwhelming prejudice that becomes a threat to everyone's constitutional rights.
NEWS
November 16, 2008 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Peter B. Scuderi, 80, of Glen Mills, a U.S. magistrate judge for 34 years, died of pneumonia Thursday at Riddle Memorial Hospital in Middletown Township. In 1974, U.S. district judges chose Judge Scuderi from among more than 40 applicants to be a federal magistrate judge for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania. He was smart, efficient and personable, and could bring opposing parties together to settle cases, his son Peter J. said. He had great respect for the courtroom and would never embarrass an attorney in front of a client, his son said.
NEWS
November 17, 1999 | by Jim Nicholson, Daily News Staff Writer
Common Pleas Judge Robert A. Latrone, one of the more colorful jurists in Philadelphia who presided over trials for more than three decades, died Sunday of natural causes. He was 68 and lived in South Philadelphia. Latrone had been hospitalized last August for emphysema and had been using oxygen. But he was working in his chambers the day before he died. The exact cause of death was still being determined. A bachelor who lived with and cared for his mother, he came to be known as a man whose first love was the court.
NEWS
November 1, 1991 | BY SARA R. NICHOLS
They just don't get it. Over and over, the Senate committee, all well-to-do white middle-aged-plus men, asks the question: "Why didn't Ms. Hill report the sexual harassment at the time?" If they had said, instead, "We don't have a clue what sexual harassment is all about," this would begin to make some sense. Why indeed would a young, newly employed, black woman, youngest of 13 children born to a religious, poor, rural Oklahoma farm couple make a complaint of sexual harassment against the president's appointed head of the EEOC?
NEWS
November 14, 1993 | By Diane Struzzi, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
When Montgomery County Court Judge William W. Vogel talks about what he's going to do after he retires tomorrow, he doesn't talk golf or any other hobby. Vogel talks work, about returning to it twice a week as a senior judge. In that position, he will handle primarily civil cases, parole/probation violations and, in some instances, non-jury trials. Sitting in his fifth-floor robing room, a small office tucked behind his courtroom, Vogel explained last week that the court system was so jam-packed with cases that his retirement, which will create a vacancy on the bench, will place something of a burden on his colleagues.
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NEWS
February 15, 2013
American philosopher and constitutional law expert Ronald Dworkin, 81, a liberal scholar who argued that the law should be founded on moral integrity, died of leukemia Thursday in London, his family said. Mr. Dworkin was a professor of law at New York University and emeritus professor at University College London. He was one of the best known and most quoted legal scholars in the United States and was also an expert on British law. Mr. Dworkin was best known for the idea that the most important virtue the law can display is integrity - understood as the moral idea that the state should act on principle so each member of the community is treated as an equal.
NEWS
November 18, 2011 | By MARCI A. HAMILTON
N OW THAT Jerry Sandusky has given an interview to Bob Costas at NBC in which declared his innocence but acknowledged that he "horsed around with kids . . . showered [with them] after workouts . . . hugged them . . . ," comparisons with the now-late Michael Jackson cannot be ignored. Indeed, in his infamous 2003 interview with "60 Minutes," the King of Pop defended sleeping with children in his bed. "Why can't you share your bed?" Jackson asked the interviewer. "The most loving thing to do is share your bed with someone.
NEWS
April 24, 2011 | By Matt Katz, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
Just how powerful is he? Gov. Christie said last week that he had mulled defying a possible order from New Jersey's Supreme Court to restore funding to schools. The statement, on a call-in radio show, left legal scholars wondering whether this was the Republican governor just spouting threats and bluster - or foreshadowing an unprecedented break with tradition. If Christie ignores the ruling, scholars said, he could be ruled in contempt of court and personally fined, he could be impeached for violating his oath of office, or he could trigger a constitutional crisis and the statewide closing of schools.
NEWS
May 11, 2010 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Mattei Ion Radu, 28, of Radnor, a legal scholar, died of complications from asthma and heart disease Friday, May 7, in New York City after dining with friends. Mr. Radu was to receive a master's degree in law from New York University later this month. He earned a bachelor's degree and a law degree from Villanova University and a master's degree in international history from the London School of Economics. From 2007 to 2009, he taught history and jurisprudence at Villanova.
NEWS
May 11, 2010 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mattei Ion Radu, 28, of Radnor, a legal scholar, died of complications from asthma and heart disease Friday, May 7, in New York City after dining with friends. Mr. Radu was to receive a master's degree in law from New York University later this month. He earned a bachelor's degree and a law degree from Villanova University and a master's degree in international history from the London School of Economics. From 2007 to 2009, he taught history and jurisprudence at Villanova. He wrote articles on topics including the Soviet Union, the Cold War, and post-World War II German constitutional law, and they were published in the Villanova Law Review, the Southern University Law Review, the Campbell Law Review, and the University of St. Thomas Journal of Law & Public Policy.
NEWS
November 16, 2008 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Peter B. Scuderi, 80, of Glen Mills, a U.S. magistrate judge for 34 years, died of pneumonia Thursday at Riddle Memorial Hospital in Middletown Township. In 1974, U.S. district judges chose Judge Scuderi from among more than 40 applicants to be a federal magistrate judge for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania. He was smart, efficient and personable, and could bring opposing parties together to settle cases, his son Peter J. said. He had great respect for the courtroom and would never embarrass an attorney in front of a client, his son said.
NEWS
September 4, 2005 | By Steve Goldstein INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
To prepare for a starring role on the biggest stage of his life, Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Arlen Specter did not limit himself to reading everything Supreme Court nominee John G. Roberts Jr. has written or to firing questions at the lawyers on his committee staff. For two months, the 75-year-old Republican from Pennsylvania conducted weekly dinner meetings with legal scholars from some of the nation's most prominent universities in what amounted to high-toned "bull sessions" on issues Specter will quiz Roberts about during next week's confirmation hearings.
NEWS
January 7, 2002 | By Leonard Pitts Jr
Sometime between now and the end of the month, Kenneth Feinberg will finalize his plan to give thousands of people millions of dollars. This will make many of those people very angry. Truth is, they've already heard the plan in its preliminary form and the response has been ... well, let's call it less than enthusiastic. Beth Murphy, for one, said it made her want to vomit. Murphy is one of thousands of people who lost a family member - in her case, a husband - on Sept. 11. Just before Christmas, Feinberg, a Washington attorney named by the government to administer a multibillion dollar fund for victims of the terrorist attack and their families, revealed how he proposes to split that money among Murphy and other survivors.
NEWS
July 30, 2001
IT DOES NOT take a legal scholar to see through government witnesses' fabrications at the Merlino trial. And it does not take wisdom to see the seeds of vindictiveness carried by the prosecutors of this persecution mission, amounting to no more than political prostitution for the sake of a courtroom victory. As long as the U.S. Attorney's office has the power to play "Let's Make a Deal" with any felon trying to shave time off a sentence, the government will be allowed to sculpture indictments exactly the way it chooses, while creating overwhelming prejudice that becomes a threat to everyone's constitutional rights.
NEWS
November 17, 1999 | by Jim Nicholson, Daily News Staff Writer
Common Pleas Judge Robert A. Latrone, one of the more colorful jurists in Philadelphia who presided over trials for more than three decades, died Sunday of natural causes. He was 68 and lived in South Philadelphia. Latrone had been hospitalized last August for emphysema and had been using oxygen. But he was working in his chambers the day before he died. The exact cause of death was still being determined. A bachelor who lived with and cared for his mother, he came to be known as a man whose first love was the court.
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