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Legality

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NEWS
June 13, 2014 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
A memo issued Wednesday questions the legality of a bill that New Jersey's Senate president has introduced to expand the number of political appointees to Rutgers University's main governing board. The bill "may be held to be an impairment of the 1956 legislative contract between Rutgers and the state, implicating the contract clause of the constitution," reads the memo, which lawmakers requested from the Office of Legislative Services. Senate President Stephen Sweeney (D., Gloucester)
NEWS
March 18, 1990 | By Burr Van Atta, Inquirer Staff Writer
The question of the legality of side-by-side twin duplexes built on a quiet street in Somerton last summer must be answered in the courts, not by the city's Zoning Board of Adjustment. At the conclusion of a special hearing Wednesday, board members told attorney William Austin Meehan Jr. that he had no other option, citing an opinion from the City Solicitor's Office that told the panel it had no authority to rule on legal and constitutional issues raised by the development's opponents.
NEWS
January 16, 1986 | By ANN W. O'NEILL, Daily News Staff Writer
Fairmount Park Commission President F. Eugene Dixon said yesterday that Mayor Goode has asked him to look into whether the controversial African- American Hall of Fame Sculpture Garden is a legal use of city parkland. Dixon said he met with Goode Thursday - the day after Dixon called the proposed garden "a monster" and three days after Goode pledged publicly to use the full power of his office to build it. During their conversation, Dixon said, Goode "indicated . . . he would like me to review the legality of the matter.
NEWS
October 19, 1986 | By Fawn Vrazo, Inquirer Staff Writer
An anti-drug proposal that would have mandated urine tests for 1,300 teachers and 10,000 sixth through 12th grade students in the Beaumont city schools was scuttled last week after the school district's attorney concluded that the tests would not meet constitutional standards. The tests were proposed last month by schools superintendent O.C. "Mike" Taylor, who said that traditional educational and counseling programs "were not very successful" against drug abuse problems in the schools.
NEWS
July 21, 1989 | By Joseph R. Daughen, Daily News Staff Writer
City Solicitor Seymour Kurland has advised Sheriff John Green and Clerk of Quarter Sessions Peter Truman not to purchase any more so-called "charity" certificates of deposit. Kurland put a freeze on the practice until he can issue an opinion on whether it is legal. The solicitor's action came after City Councilwoman Joan Specter asked him to decide if the two officials legally could donate part of the interest earned by city funds to charities of their choice. Specter also asked District Attorney Ronald D. Castille to investigate to determine if such a diversion of funds constitutes a violation of criminal law. DA spokeswoman Laura Linton refused to comment on Specter's request.
NEWS
August 1, 2000 | By Amy Jeter, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Philadelphia has suspended high-jackpot lotteries conducted by some local parishes to raise money until it reviews the legality of the games. The diocesan legal counsel has been meeting with priests and has recommended discontinuing the lotteries "until the review process is complete," according to a written statement issued yesterday. Priests in at least two area Catholic parishes told their congregations Sunday that they would stop the lotteries, where jackpots routinely built up over several weeks to $30,000 and sometimes surpassed $100,000.
NEWS
September 21, 1995 | By Angela Paik, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The Delaware County Prison Board is considering taking the concept of charging prisoners for incarceration a step further than any other county in the area has gone. The board agreed yesterday to have its solicitor, Robert M. DiOrio, and Superintendent of Prisons George W. Hill look into the legality of charging inmates at the Delaware County Prison the total amount it costs the county to house them. If Wackenhut Corrections Corp. moves in as scheduled Oct. 1 to build and run the county's new prison, the company would charge the county about $35 a day per prisoner.
NEWS
December 15, 1994 | By Nancy Lawson, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
School board members are expected to vote tonight on a measure designed to cut school district costs by increasing tuition for Delaware County Community College students. Introduced by the Ridley school board, which adopted the resolution last month, the proposal would allow individual school districts to charge tuition fees separate from those levied by DCCC. But even if two-thirds of the 11 sponsoring school districts voted in favor of the resolution - the amount required to approve the college's budget - the measure might not be legal, said Bill Lincke, Haverford school board's solicitor.
NEWS
August 8, 1996 | By Dianna Marder, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
How's this for a conflict: Kevin E. Vaughan is executive director of the city's Human Relations Commission. He is also one of the handful of city employees who would gain from the mayor's June 7 executive order granting health benefits to the domestic partners of some gay city workers. He is a Rendell appointee, and an openly gay man who just bought a house with his partner. He even testified in favor of the mayor's order at a public hearing. And now, the courts have told the Human Relations Commission that it, not the courts, should determine the legality of the mayor's order.
NEWS
August 14, 1998 | By Deirdre Shaw, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Parents hoping to collect up to $1,000 next year from the Southeast Delco School District's controversial voucher program shouldn't be spending the money yet. The school board, which had planned to award the vouchers in June, will hold the payments until a lawsuit against the board and district is settled, three board members and the board's solicitor said this week. No one is sure when that will be. When parents call board member and vouchers supporter Byron Mundy, "I have to tell them that there is a possibility that we may not be able to make any payment come June," he said.
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NEWS
June 15, 2015 | By Maddie Hanna and Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
When New Jersey's high court ruled last week that Gov. Christie had the authority to cut billions from payments he had promised the state pension system, it spared the governor a massive budget shortfall as he prepares to announce a presidential decision. Though the legal victory over public-worker unions averted immediate crisis, it did not relieve Christie - or state lawmakers - of a reality less worthy of campaign-trail celebration: an unfunded pension liability that continues to strain the state budget and funds for many workers at risk of running out of money within the next decade.
BUSINESS
June 3, 2015 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
Norfolk Southern Corp. touted its safety efforts in transporting crude oil in a letter to Gov. Wolf, but the railroad suggested it may file a legal challenge over some recent federal safety rules. Following the issuance of new rules by the U.S. Department of Transportation on May 8, "Norfolk Southern is still considering its legal options," the company's Chairman and CEO C.W. Moorman said in a letter delivered to Wolf on Monday. Like other railroads, Norfolk Southern was particularly "disappointed" with new rules on brakes that the railroad said would produce "little safety benefit," Moorman said.
NEWS
May 10, 2015 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
The law firm representing Gov. Christie's office in the George Washington Bridge lane-closure investigation has billed the state more than $300,000 since December, according to invoices released Friday by the Attorney General's Office. Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher L.L.P. billed the governor's office at a rate of $350 an hour for a total of $311,425 from December through Sunday, the invoices show. Last year, the firm billed the state $7.5 million. Christie's office paid an additional $1.25 million to other law firms last year in connection with the bridge probe.
NEWS
May 7, 2015 | BY MENSAH M. DEAN, Daily News Staff Writer deanm@phillynews.com, 215-854-4172
LAW-AND-ORDER has a price tag, and what Mayor Nutter has proposed in his latest budget isn't enough, according to District Attorney Seth Williams and one of the city's top judges. During budget hearings before City Council yesterday, Williams and Common Pleas Administrative Judge Kevin Dougherty each said their offices needed an additional $1 million - plus change - for the fiscal year beginning July 1. Dougherty, who since December has headed the court's trial division, told Council that he needs $1.1 million to buy and implement the use of about 375 GPS wireless ankle monitors for adult defendants who cannot post bail.
NEWS
April 29, 2015
ISSUE | NEXT MAYOR Worthy pleadings The mayoral candidates' suggestions for dealing with Philadelphia's staggering poverty problem left out one critical need: increased funding for civil legal aid to poor people ("Mayoral Q&A," April 24). Philadelphia has one of the very best legal-aid programs in the nation, one that is known for aggressively representing low-income Philadelphians, making sure their problems are heard and addressed, and pushing for systems and policies to be fixed when they harm vulnerable poor families.
NEWS
April 21, 2015 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Another internal battle is brewing on Pennsylvania State University's board of trustees, and this time it could lead to legal action. Seven alumni-elected trustees on the 32-member board have reiterated their demand to have access to materials used in preparation for the blistering investigative report by former FBI director Louis Freeh that said former university leaders conspired to cover up child sex-abuse allegations against former assistant football...
NEWS
March 16, 2015 | BY LARA WITT, Daily News Staff Writer wittl@phillynews.com, 215-854-5927
TAMMY Sadler-Chase was sick and uninsured. She had lost her mobility and her sight after being diagnosed with a rare blood disorder. Her hospital bills had reached nearly $200,000. And every time she applied for insurance, she was denied. Desperate for help, Sadler-Chase called the PHMC Rising Sun Health Center in Olney, where she was connected to a lawyer named Lydia Gottesfeld, who helped her secure proper care and health-care coverage. Sadler-Chase is one of more than 400 patients who are utilizing Rising Sun Health Center, which this month officially began offering on-site financial and legal services to its clients, making it the first of its kind in the nation.
SPORTS
March 2, 2015 | By Joe Juliano, Inquirer Staff Writer
CINCINNATI - Villanova coach Jay Wright said JayVaughn Pinkston "is doing the best he can" to adhere to the conditions of the program the player must conclude satisfactorily to have his record expunged in connection with a 2010 fight at an off-campus party. But Pinkston, the Wildcats' senior forward and cocaptain, has not fulfilled the terms of a judge's order requiring 375 hours of community service, and payment of more than $11,000 in restitution and court costs, and probably won't be able to do so until after his Accelerated Rehabilitative Disposition program ends in May. The Montgomery County District Attorney's Office filed a petition last week contending that Pinkston, 23, violated the terms of his ARD sentence.
NEWS
February 27, 2015 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - With the state Senate and the governor on board, and House leaders showing positive interest, lawmakers advocating for medical marijuana legalization in Pennsylvania say they are convinced it will become law as early as July. "This is going to pass the Senate, and we've got votes in the House by a wide margin," said Sen. Daylin Leach (D., Montgomery), cosponsor of the bill, following a hearing on the issue Wednesday. Sen. Mike Folmer (R., Lebanon), the bill's lead sponsor, is chairman of the state government committee, which will vote on the bill in April.
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