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Legality

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NEWS
June 13, 2014 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
A memo issued Wednesday questions the legality of a bill that New Jersey's Senate president has introduced to expand the number of political appointees to Rutgers University's main governing board. The bill "may be held to be an impairment of the 1956 legislative contract between Rutgers and the state, implicating the contract clause of the constitution," reads the memo, which lawmakers requested from the Office of Legislative Services. Senate President Stephen Sweeney (D., Gloucester)
NEWS
March 18, 1990 | By Burr Van Atta, Inquirer Staff Writer
The question of the legality of side-by-side twin duplexes built on a quiet street in Somerton last summer must be answered in the courts, not by the city's Zoning Board of Adjustment. At the conclusion of a special hearing Wednesday, board members told attorney William Austin Meehan Jr. that he had no other option, citing an opinion from the City Solicitor's Office that told the panel it had no authority to rule on legal and constitutional issues raised by the development's opponents.
NEWS
January 16, 1986 | By ANN W. O'NEILL, Daily News Staff Writer
Fairmount Park Commission President F. Eugene Dixon said yesterday that Mayor Goode has asked him to look into whether the controversial African- American Hall of Fame Sculpture Garden is a legal use of city parkland. Dixon said he met with Goode Thursday - the day after Dixon called the proposed garden "a monster" and three days after Goode pledged publicly to use the full power of his office to build it. During their conversation, Dixon said, Goode "indicated . . . he would like me to review the legality of the matter.
NEWS
October 19, 1986 | By Fawn Vrazo, Inquirer Staff Writer
An anti-drug proposal that would have mandated urine tests for 1,300 teachers and 10,000 sixth through 12th grade students in the Beaumont city schools was scuttled last week after the school district's attorney concluded that the tests would not meet constitutional standards. The tests were proposed last month by schools superintendent O.C. "Mike" Taylor, who said that traditional educational and counseling programs "were not very successful" against drug abuse problems in the schools.
NEWS
July 21, 1989 | By Joseph R. Daughen, Daily News Staff Writer
City Solicitor Seymour Kurland has advised Sheriff John Green and Clerk of Quarter Sessions Peter Truman not to purchase any more so-called "charity" certificates of deposit. Kurland put a freeze on the practice until he can issue an opinion on whether it is legal. The solicitor's action came after City Councilwoman Joan Specter asked him to decide if the two officials legally could donate part of the interest earned by city funds to charities of their choice. Specter also asked District Attorney Ronald D. Castille to investigate to determine if such a diversion of funds constitutes a violation of criminal law. DA spokeswoman Laura Linton refused to comment on Specter's request.
NEWS
August 1, 2000 | By Amy Jeter, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Philadelphia has suspended high-jackpot lotteries conducted by some local parishes to raise money until it reviews the legality of the games. The diocesan legal counsel has been meeting with priests and has recommended discontinuing the lotteries "until the review process is complete," according to a written statement issued yesterday. Priests in at least two area Catholic parishes told their congregations Sunday that they would stop the lotteries, where jackpots routinely built up over several weeks to $30,000 and sometimes surpassed $100,000.
NEWS
September 21, 1995 | By Angela Paik, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The Delaware County Prison Board is considering taking the concept of charging prisoners for incarceration a step further than any other county in the area has gone. The board agreed yesterday to have its solicitor, Robert M. DiOrio, and Superintendent of Prisons George W. Hill look into the legality of charging inmates at the Delaware County Prison the total amount it costs the county to house them. If Wackenhut Corrections Corp. moves in as scheduled Oct. 1 to build and run the county's new prison, the company would charge the county about $35 a day per prisoner.
NEWS
December 15, 1994 | By Nancy Lawson, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
School board members are expected to vote tonight on a measure designed to cut school district costs by increasing tuition for Delaware County Community College students. Introduced by the Ridley school board, which adopted the resolution last month, the proposal would allow individual school districts to charge tuition fees separate from those levied by DCCC. But even if two-thirds of the 11 sponsoring school districts voted in favor of the resolution - the amount required to approve the college's budget - the measure might not be legal, said Bill Lincke, Haverford school board's solicitor.
NEWS
August 8, 1996 | By Dianna Marder, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
How's this for a conflict: Kevin E. Vaughan is executive director of the city's Human Relations Commission. He is also one of the handful of city employees who would gain from the mayor's June 7 executive order granting health benefits to the domestic partners of some gay city workers. He is a Rendell appointee, and an openly gay man who just bought a house with his partner. He even testified in favor of the mayor's order at a public hearing. And now, the courts have told the Human Relations Commission that it, not the courts, should determine the legality of the mayor's order.
NEWS
August 14, 1998 | By Deirdre Shaw, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Parents hoping to collect up to $1,000 next year from the Southeast Delco School District's controversial voucher program shouldn't be spending the money yet. The school board, which had planned to award the vouchers in June, will hold the payments until a lawsuit against the board and district is settled, three board members and the board's solicitor said this week. No one is sure when that will be. When parents call board member and vouchers supporter Byron Mundy, "I have to tell them that there is a possibility that we may not be able to make any payment come June," he said.
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NEWS
May 18, 2016 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Staff Writer
Despite all the news about Atlantic City's do-or-die financial predicament, a new idea every once in a while bubbles to the surface. Taking an alcoholic beverage from one bar to another on the Boardwalk legally - as opposed to how it happens during the St. Paddy's Day and Miss America Parades - is one of them. Atlantic City wants to bring the time-honored but furtive Boardwalk pub-crawl out in the open. On Wednesday, the city council will consider a trial period for a law that would permit anyone over age 21 to take one plastic container of beer, wine, or another alcoholic drink, marked with the logo of the establishment that served it, onto the Boardwalk between Albany and Metropolitan Avenues.
NEWS
May 9, 2016 | By Barbara Boyer, Jan Hefler, and Melanie Burney, STAFF WRITERS
A bombshell claim by a veteran investigator that evidence was destroyed in the investigation of the deaths of Cooper Health System CEO John P. Sheridan Jr. and his wife raises potential credibility issues and demands an independent review, legal experts say. The allegations by Somerset County (N.J.) Detective Jeffrey Scozzafava surfaced in a whistle-blower lawsuit, sparking new questions about the deaths of Sheridan and his wife, Joyce. The couple were found dead in their home on Sept.
NEWS
May 5, 2016 | By Jan Hefler, Staff Writer
The New Jersey Supreme Court has let stand a lower-court ruling that a Gloucester County family must pay part of a $4 million fine and a $2 million environmental cleanup cost after the family acquired a contaminated thermometer plant and converted it into a children's day-care center without removing the building's toxic mercury vapors. The decision last week not to hear the appeal caps a 10-year legal battle that started soon after the state Department of Environmental Protection discovered the Kiddie Kollege day-care center had opened in 2004 in an abandoned factory in Franklinville.
NEWS
April 28, 2016
By Karen Sacks As New Jersey legislators and policymakers focus on the need to help former inmates reenter society, it's important to note that one of the biggest hurdles is a legal one. And it's often a surmountable one. Legal assistance can make the difference between an ex-offender gaining a solid footing or returning to the behavior that led to prison. At Volunteer Lawyers for Justice (VLJ), which has been providing a wide range of free legal services to the economically disadvantaged for 15 years, we see this every day. Our Reentry Legal Services program provides the crucial link to make reentry possible, assisting nonviolent ex-offenders with legal counsel on issues ranging from driver's license restoration to expungement.
NEWS
April 19, 2016 | By Julia Terruso, Staff Writer
HARRISBURG - Hundreds of cheering families, legislators and patients watched Gov. Wolf sign a medical marijuana bill into law Sunday afternoon, many hopeful at last for relief from debilitating pain, seizures and other medical conditions. Allie Delp watched from her mother's lap, purple sunglasses strapped around her wide blue eyes to protect them from the light. Large crowds are tough for Allie. The 4-year-old suffers from Dravet syndrome, a severe seizure disorder, and most days she stays in the dimly lit, cool comforts of her home to avoid triggers.
NEWS
March 31, 2016 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Staff Writer
The death of Philadelphia building inspector Ronald Wagenhoffer has become a forgotten chapter in a story already teeming with tragedy: the deadly 2013 collapse that buried a Salvation Army thrift store in Center City. Wagenhoffer was the Department of Licenses and Inspections inspector assigned to the demolition of several buildings in the 2100 block of Market Street. On June 12, 2013 - one week after the collapse that killed six and injured 13 - Wagenhoffer killed himself. Now, the contents of Wagenhoffer's cellphone are the subject of a brewing legal fight between the District Attorney's Office and lawyers for STB Investments Corp., the company of multimillionaire real estate investor Richard Basciano that owned the properties being razed.
NEWS
March 17, 2016 | By Angela Couloumbis and Justine McDaniel, STAFF WRITERS
HARRISBURG - The House voted Wednesday to legalize medical marijuana, ending a debate that languished for years and all but ensuring that Pennsylvania will become the 24th state to pass such a law. The measure will allow people suffering from cancer, epilepsy, multiple sclerosis, intractable seizures, and other conditions to access medical marijuana in pill, oil, or ointment form at dispensaries statewide. It would not be able to be smoked. The bill now heads to the Senate, where it has had support and leaders say it will pass.
NEWS
March 12, 2016 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Staff Writer
U.S. Rep. Chaka Fattah's new lawyers come from a Center City firm with past ties to the congressman's family, considerable experience handling high-profile cases, and an apparent lack of concern over whether it gets paid any time soon. A team of three attorneys from Schnader, Harrison, Segal & Lewis L.L.P. will make its courtroom debut Friday at a hearing in which the lawyers hope to persuade a federal judge to toss Fattah's racketeering conspiracy charges. Their attachment to the case comes amid a flap between the Philadelphia Democrat and his previous lawyers, who say they have not been fully paid and have pushed for the court's permission to drop the congressman as a client.
NEWS
March 1, 2016 | By Terry Jarrett
The U.S. Supreme Court recently took the unprecedented step of issuing a stay of President Obama's massive Clean Power Plan. The court ruled that states should not be compelled to assume the exorbitant costs imposed by the plan until a federal court determines its legality. The ruling produced a huge sigh of relief from the 27 states currently suing to halt a large-scale transformation of their energy grid through one of the most far-reaching regulations ever imposed by the Environmental Protection Agency.
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