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Legality

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NEWS
June 13, 2014 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
A memo issued Wednesday questions the legality of a bill that New Jersey's Senate president has introduced to expand the number of political appointees to Rutgers University's main governing board. The bill "may be held to be an impairment of the 1956 legislative contract between Rutgers and the state, implicating the contract clause of the constitution," reads the memo, which lawmakers requested from the Office of Legislative Services. Senate President Stephen Sweeney (D., Gloucester)
NEWS
March 18, 1990 | By Burr Van Atta, Inquirer Staff Writer
The question of the legality of side-by-side twin duplexes built on a quiet street in Somerton last summer must be answered in the courts, not by the city's Zoning Board of Adjustment. At the conclusion of a special hearing Wednesday, board members told attorney William Austin Meehan Jr. that he had no other option, citing an opinion from the City Solicitor's Office that told the panel it had no authority to rule on legal and constitutional issues raised by the development's opponents.
NEWS
January 16, 1986 | By ANN W. O'NEILL, Daily News Staff Writer
Fairmount Park Commission President F. Eugene Dixon said yesterday that Mayor Goode has asked him to look into whether the controversial African- American Hall of Fame Sculpture Garden is a legal use of city parkland. Dixon said he met with Goode Thursday - the day after Dixon called the proposed garden "a monster" and three days after Goode pledged publicly to use the full power of his office to build it. During their conversation, Dixon said, Goode "indicated . . . he would like me to review the legality of the matter.
NEWS
October 19, 1986 | By Fawn Vrazo, Inquirer Staff Writer
An anti-drug proposal that would have mandated urine tests for 1,300 teachers and 10,000 sixth through 12th grade students in the Beaumont city schools was scuttled last week after the school district's attorney concluded that the tests would not meet constitutional standards. The tests were proposed last month by schools superintendent O.C. "Mike" Taylor, who said that traditional educational and counseling programs "were not very successful" against drug abuse problems in the schools.
NEWS
July 21, 1989 | By Joseph R. Daughen, Daily News Staff Writer
City Solicitor Seymour Kurland has advised Sheriff John Green and Clerk of Quarter Sessions Peter Truman not to purchase any more so-called "charity" certificates of deposit. Kurland put a freeze on the practice until he can issue an opinion on whether it is legal. The solicitor's action came after City Councilwoman Joan Specter asked him to decide if the two officials legally could donate part of the interest earned by city funds to charities of their choice. Specter also asked District Attorney Ronald D. Castille to investigate to determine if such a diversion of funds constitutes a violation of criminal law. DA spokeswoman Laura Linton refused to comment on Specter's request.
NEWS
August 1, 2000 | By Amy Jeter, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Philadelphia has suspended high-jackpot lotteries conducted by some local parishes to raise money until it reviews the legality of the games. The diocesan legal counsel has been meeting with priests and has recommended discontinuing the lotteries "until the review process is complete," according to a written statement issued yesterday. Priests in at least two area Catholic parishes told their congregations Sunday that they would stop the lotteries, where jackpots routinely built up over several weeks to $30,000 and sometimes surpassed $100,000.
NEWS
September 21, 1995 | By Angela Paik, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The Delaware County Prison Board is considering taking the concept of charging prisoners for incarceration a step further than any other county in the area has gone. The board agreed yesterday to have its solicitor, Robert M. DiOrio, and Superintendent of Prisons George W. Hill look into the legality of charging inmates at the Delaware County Prison the total amount it costs the county to house them. If Wackenhut Corrections Corp. moves in as scheduled Oct. 1 to build and run the county's new prison, the company would charge the county about $35 a day per prisoner.
NEWS
December 15, 1994 | By Nancy Lawson, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
School board members are expected to vote tonight on a measure designed to cut school district costs by increasing tuition for Delaware County Community College students. Introduced by the Ridley school board, which adopted the resolution last month, the proposal would allow individual school districts to charge tuition fees separate from those levied by DCCC. But even if two-thirds of the 11 sponsoring school districts voted in favor of the resolution - the amount required to approve the college's budget - the measure might not be legal, said Bill Lincke, Haverford school board's solicitor.
NEWS
August 8, 1996 | By Dianna Marder, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
How's this for a conflict: Kevin E. Vaughan is executive director of the city's Human Relations Commission. He is also one of the handful of city employees who would gain from the mayor's June 7 executive order granting health benefits to the domestic partners of some gay city workers. He is a Rendell appointee, and an openly gay man who just bought a house with his partner. He even testified in favor of the mayor's order at a public hearing. And now, the courts have told the Human Relations Commission that it, not the courts, should determine the legality of the mayor's order.
NEWS
August 14, 1998 | By Deirdre Shaw, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Parents hoping to collect up to $1,000 next year from the Southeast Delco School District's controversial voucher program shouldn't be spending the money yet. The school board, which had planned to award the vouchers in June, will hold the payments until a lawsuit against the board and district is settled, three board members and the board's solicitor said this week. No one is sure when that will be. When parents call board member and vouchers supporter Byron Mundy, "I have to tell them that there is a possibility that we may not be able to make any payment come June," he said.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 10, 2016 | By Jeff Gammage, Staff Writer
It's not pirate radio. But then again, it's not too far from a parrot and an eye patch. Ideas for programming include shows on geek culture, salsa music, and legalizing marijuana, along with poetry slams, local bands, and news from the neighborhoods. Some shows might be broadcast in Khmer or Bhutanese. Philadelphia's new radio station, low-power, public-access WPPM - as in "People Powered Media" - is inventing itself in a hurry. It's set to go live with all original programs next month, charged with serving the underserved and providing unique and educational points of view and information.
NEWS
July 18, 2016 | By Jan Hefler, Staff Writer
Tina DeSilvio said the Kiddie Kollege Day Care owner called twice that weekend. The first time was to say a planned trip to Storybook Land was canceled. The second was to report the reason - New Jersey officials had ordered the day care in Franklinville shut down. Immediately. Toxic mercury vapors had been detected inside the rooms where nearly 100 babies and children had played for two years. DeSilvio's daughters, then ages 3 and 6, were among them. "I'll never forget that call," DeSilvio said in a recent interview a few days ahead of the 10th anniversary of the Kiddie Kollege closing.
NEWS
June 28, 2016 | By Martha Woodall, Staff Writer
For 7 1/2 years, several parents of former students at Agora Cyber Charter School lived under the cloud of a defamation suit that would not go away. The school's founder, Dorothy June Brown, had sued the parents after they asked questions about operations of the taxpayer-funded school. She said they had made statements implying that she was "corrupt, incompetent, and possibly criminal. " The suit quietly ended 13 days ago when Montgomery County's prothonotary, in a housekeeping move, closed the case because there had been no activity for more than two years.
NEWS
June 23, 2016
A story Tuesday on the signing of the Philadelphia beverage tax into law incorrectly identified the group that retained Kline & Specter P.C. to challenge the legality of the tax. It was the American Beverage Association. A story Friday on Philadelphia Health Department restaurant inspections incorrectly described the restaurants Sannee and Wong Wong. They offer table service as well as takeout.
NEWS
June 15, 2016 | By Kevin Riordan, Columnist
The young woman became a U.S. citizen 15 years ago. But her husband, the father of her two children, is undocumented. During a visit to the Mexican consulate in Philadelphia, the Delaware couple share their story with Jeffrey S. DeCristofaro and Evelyn Sabando, who are making a presentation about the services of the Camden Center for Law and Social Justice. At the center's downtown Camden office, meanwhile, Lisa M. Incollingo handles cases like those of a Gloucester Township senior citizen and a Camden mother of five, both of whom recently got protection from an abusive family member.
NEWS
June 8, 2016 | By Andrew Seidman, TRENTON BUREAU
A federal appeals panel on Monday weighed First Amendment rights against the privacy interests of individuals who have not been charged with a crime, as it considered whether the names of unindicted accomplices in the George Washington Bridge lane-closing scandal should be provided to the news media. Nearly two hours of oral argument seemed to indicate that the three-judge panel's ruling may hinge on an arcane legal point - whether the list of so-called unindicted coconspirators, already provided by prosecutors to the defense, supplements the public indictment or is discovery material that is shielded from the public.
NEWS
June 7, 2016 | By Chris Brennan, Columnist
The Democrats who run Center City's Eighth Ward have been pondering one question for four weeks: Who set in motion the federal probe that resulted in State Sen. Larry Farnese's indictment? Who dropped that dime? Many think it must have been former City Commissioner Stephanie Singer, who led the ward before Farnese took over in 2011 and clashed with him over that last year. Singer won't say. But the timeline tells an interesting story. Singer ran as a reformer for the three-member board that oversees city elections, defeating the formidable nine-term chairwoman Marge Tartaglione in the 2011 primary.
NEWS
June 6, 2016 | By Andrew Seidman, TRENTON BUREAU
On one level, the legal fight over access to the names of unindicted accomplices in the George Washington Bridge lane-closure case pits the public's First Amendment rights against privacy interests of individuals who haven't been charged with a crime. Yet the case may turn on an arcane argument over whether the list of so-called unindicted coconspirators was part of a routine sharing of evidence among lawyers or carries greater legal significance as a supplement to the public indictment.
NEWS
June 1, 2016
Pennsylvania lawmakers are poised to put a welcome end to the long-standing official fiction that ride-sharing services such as Uber are fine for most of the commonwealth (and the country) but a grave threat to Philadelphia's way of life. Unfortunately, the legislature could at the same time further empower the wayward agency that strove to propagate that myth, basic cable's own Philadelphia Parking Authority. Since the state Public Utility Commission provisionally licensed Uber and Lyft to operate everywhere in the state except Philadelphia more than a year ago, ride-sharing services have constituted a busy black market within the city.
NEWS
May 28, 2016 | By Melanie Burney, STAFF WRITER
Two students from the Philadelphia region advanced to the final rounds Thursday in the Scripps National Spelling Bee, but fell short of capturing the best speller title. Shruthika Padhy, of Cherry Hill, was eliminated when she incorrectly spelled the word "tyee," (a type of fish). Padhy, 10, is a fifth grader at Bret Harte Elementary School in Cherry Hill, N.J. She was sponsored by the school. She was interviewed by Scripps after her elimination and asked what she learned from the experience.
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