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Legality

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NEWS
June 13, 2014 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
A memo issued Wednesday questions the legality of a bill that New Jersey's Senate president has introduced to expand the number of political appointees to Rutgers University's main governing board. The bill "may be held to be an impairment of the 1956 legislative contract between Rutgers and the state, implicating the contract clause of the constitution," reads the memo, which lawmakers requested from the Office of Legislative Services. Senate President Stephen Sweeney (D., Gloucester)
NEWS
March 18, 1990 | By Burr Van Atta, Inquirer Staff Writer
The question of the legality of side-by-side twin duplexes built on a quiet street in Somerton last summer must be answered in the courts, not by the city's Zoning Board of Adjustment. At the conclusion of a special hearing Wednesday, board members told attorney William Austin Meehan Jr. that he had no other option, citing an opinion from the City Solicitor's Office that told the panel it had no authority to rule on legal and constitutional issues raised by the development's opponents.
NEWS
January 16, 1986 | By ANN W. O'NEILL, Daily News Staff Writer
Fairmount Park Commission President F. Eugene Dixon said yesterday that Mayor Goode has asked him to look into whether the controversial African- American Hall of Fame Sculpture Garden is a legal use of city parkland. Dixon said he met with Goode Thursday - the day after Dixon called the proposed garden "a monster" and three days after Goode pledged publicly to use the full power of his office to build it. During their conversation, Dixon said, Goode "indicated . . . he would like me to review the legality of the matter.
NEWS
October 19, 1986 | By Fawn Vrazo, Inquirer Staff Writer
An anti-drug proposal that would have mandated urine tests for 1,300 teachers and 10,000 sixth through 12th grade students in the Beaumont city schools was scuttled last week after the school district's attorney concluded that the tests would not meet constitutional standards. The tests were proposed last month by schools superintendent O.C. "Mike" Taylor, who said that traditional educational and counseling programs "were not very successful" against drug abuse problems in the schools.
NEWS
July 21, 1989 | By Joseph R. Daughen, Daily News Staff Writer
City Solicitor Seymour Kurland has advised Sheriff John Green and Clerk of Quarter Sessions Peter Truman not to purchase any more so-called "charity" certificates of deposit. Kurland put a freeze on the practice until he can issue an opinion on whether it is legal. The solicitor's action came after City Councilwoman Joan Specter asked him to decide if the two officials legally could donate part of the interest earned by city funds to charities of their choice. Specter also asked District Attorney Ronald D. Castille to investigate to determine if such a diversion of funds constitutes a violation of criminal law. DA spokeswoman Laura Linton refused to comment on Specter's request.
NEWS
August 1, 2000 | By Amy Jeter, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Philadelphia has suspended high-jackpot lotteries conducted by some local parishes to raise money until it reviews the legality of the games. The diocesan legal counsel has been meeting with priests and has recommended discontinuing the lotteries "until the review process is complete," according to a written statement issued yesterday. Priests in at least two area Catholic parishes told their congregations Sunday that they would stop the lotteries, where jackpots routinely built up over several weeks to $30,000 and sometimes surpassed $100,000.
NEWS
September 21, 1995 | By Angela Paik, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The Delaware County Prison Board is considering taking the concept of charging prisoners for incarceration a step further than any other county in the area has gone. The board agreed yesterday to have its solicitor, Robert M. DiOrio, and Superintendent of Prisons George W. Hill look into the legality of charging inmates at the Delaware County Prison the total amount it costs the county to house them. If Wackenhut Corrections Corp. moves in as scheduled Oct. 1 to build and run the county's new prison, the company would charge the county about $35 a day per prisoner.
NEWS
December 15, 1994 | By Nancy Lawson, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
School board members are expected to vote tonight on a measure designed to cut school district costs by increasing tuition for Delaware County Community College students. Introduced by the Ridley school board, which adopted the resolution last month, the proposal would allow individual school districts to charge tuition fees separate from those levied by DCCC. But even if two-thirds of the 11 sponsoring school districts voted in favor of the resolution - the amount required to approve the college's budget - the measure might not be legal, said Bill Lincke, Haverford school board's solicitor.
NEWS
August 8, 1996 | By Dianna Marder, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
How's this for a conflict: Kevin E. Vaughan is executive director of the city's Human Relations Commission. He is also one of the handful of city employees who would gain from the mayor's June 7 executive order granting health benefits to the domestic partners of some gay city workers. He is a Rendell appointee, and an openly gay man who just bought a house with his partner. He even testified in favor of the mayor's order at a public hearing. And now, the courts have told the Human Relations Commission that it, not the courts, should determine the legality of the mayor's order.
NEWS
August 14, 1998 | By Deirdre Shaw, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Parents hoping to collect up to $1,000 next year from the Southeast Delco School District's controversial voucher program shouldn't be spending the money yet. The school board, which had planned to award the vouchers in June, will hold the payments until a lawsuit against the board and district is settled, three board members and the board's solicitor said this week. No one is sure when that will be. When parents call board member and vouchers supporter Byron Mundy, "I have to tell them that there is a possibility that we may not be able to make any payment come June," he said.
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BUSINESS
February 3, 2016 | By Chris Mondics, Staff Writer
Since the disputed 2000 presidential contest and the U.S. Supreme Court's decision in Bush v. Gore , the law governing elections has become ever more contentious as the political parties vie for the slightest advantage. Seeing a growing market for legal advice on everything from campaign finance to congressional redistricting, Center City's Ballard Spahr law firm has created a practice group with 15 lawyers to guide political candidates, parties, and corporations through the thickets of case law, statutes, and regulations that govern political contests.
NEWS
January 28, 2016 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Staff Writer
A federal judge on Tuesday urged U.S. Rep. Chaka Fattah, who says he is more focused on raising money for his reelection campaign than on his corruption trial, to rethink his priorities. U.S. District Judge Harvey Bartle III issued the warning as Fattah's lawyers sought to be removed from his case, saying he had not paid their legal bills in nearly five months. "I think you need to take this matter seriously and think hard and fast about your priorities," the judge told the Philadelphia Democrat.
BUSINESS
January 23, 2016 | By Harold Brubaker, STAFF WRITER
David F. Simon, longtime chief legal officer at the former Jefferson Health System, has been named to the same job at the Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine, the medical school on City Avenue said Thursday. Less than a year ago, Simon joined Elliott Greenleaf, a Blue Bell law firm, as senior shareholder and co-chairman of the firm's executive committee. His last day at the firm is Jan. 29, PCOM said. Jay Feldstein, PCOM's president, and Simon know each other from working together at the former US Health Care.
NEWS
January 6, 2016 | Inquirer Editorial Board
The Philadelphia School District's outsize war on a whistle-blower appears to be lurching toward a glorious victory - for its lawyers. After spending about $1 million in legal fees and five years defending its indefensible decision to fire Francis X. Dougherty for exposing a questionable contract, the district could settle with the former administrator. All told, the chronically poor system has paid twice as much to Center City's Tucker Law Group and other firms to contest four lawsuits related to the wayward contract, The Inquirer's Martha Woodall reported.
NEWS
December 1, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ruth Ann McCann Beeghley, 93, of Lafayette Hill, a legal secretary, died Friday, Nov. 13, of congestive heart failure in the hospice care facility at Abington-Lansdale Hospital. Two days earlier, she had celebrated her birthday with four generations of family and hospital staff. Mrs. Beeghley was born in Paris, Texas, to Noble T. McCann and Ruth Hiestand McCann. Her father was the dining services superintendent for the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railroad. As a result, Mrs. Beeghley lived in many towns along the railroad in the Midwest and Southwest.
NEWS
November 24, 2015 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
As public acceptance of marijuana use grows in the United States, nationwide arrests for simple possession of pot have dropped in recent years. New Jersey is going in the opposite direction. Marijuana arrests in the state jumped 10 percent in 2012 and 2013, according to the latest New Jersey State Police Uniform Crime Reports. In fact, the 24,765 arrests made for possessing small amounts of marijuana in 2013 is the highest number in 20 years, and nearly double the amount in 1993, when the state's population was 12 percent less, based on state police statistics and an analysis by the ACLU of New Jersey.
NEWS
November 18, 2015 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
New Jersey inched closer to possibly legalizing marijuana when the chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee held the state's first hearing on the issue Monday, after inviting a dozen legalization advocates to testify on behalf of a bill first proposed nearly two years ago. But Sen. Nicholas P. Scutari (D., Union) said his bill to regulate and tax the recreational use of marijuana by adults was still in its early stages, especially since Gov. Christie has promised a veto. "The governor's been clear on this for a long time," Kevin Roberts, a Christie spokesman, said in an email.
NEWS
November 11, 2015 | By Jessica Parks, Inquirer Staff Writer
A year after explosive corruption allegations brought statewide attention to Centre County's courthouse, the first official fallout has come from the ballot box. Voters in the Pennsylvania county last week ousted the commissioner whose bitter feud with the district attorney resulted in several lawsuits against the county. District Attorney Stacy Parks-Miller is suing the commissioners, county staff, and several attorneys, charging defamation after a series of allegations that she forged a judge's signature and violated ethics rules.
NEWS
November 3, 2015 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
Has Pennsylvania Attorney General Kathleen G. Kane opened the door for criminal defense lawyers to rummage through her office's most sensitive internal email documents? Kane surprised many in the state's legal community last week when she released two internal emails of a Pennsylvania judge who had supervised the grand jury investigation of convicted child abuser Jerry Sandusky, a former Pennsylvania State University assistant football coach. They are appalled that Kane would cede the presumption of confidentiality by voluntarily releasing the emails.
NEWS
October 30, 2015 | By Chris Palmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pennsylvania Attorney General Kathleen G. Kane said Wednesday that her office had obtained emails among a state judge, his lawyers, and Inquirer reporters because they were housed on her office's computer servers. Responding to an article in The Inquirer reporting that Kane's office had obtained the emails and offered to provide them to other media outlets, Kane said any suggestion that she had acquired the emails from any source other than her servers was "false. " Kane provided no details, but sources said she obtained them because Judge Barry Feudale mistakenly sent the messages to the old email address of a former top prosecutor in the Attorney General's Office.
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