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NEWS
April 20, 2009 | By A.D. Amorosi FOR THE INQUIRER
At Saturday's sold-out show at World Cafe Live, the Flatlanders showed they are both a great band and a legend at work. Joe Ely, Butch Hancock, and Jimmie Dale Gilmore shone as an ensemble and individually, a superb demonstration of why they are so revered. Throughout the 1970s, Waylon Jennings, Willie Nelson, and Kris Kristofferson - Texans all - eschewed country music's satin twang and Nudie suits to craft something bold. It was a stripped-down outlaw vibe of weary lyricism topped with whiskey, dope, woe, and social issues that transcended mere romance gone wrong.
NEWS
April 21, 1990 | By ELLEN GOODMAN
She made her last movie just before I was born. So I wasn't introduced to Garbo as a star. I never stepped in from the Depression to the romantic darkness of a movie theater and the exotic accent of a foreign woman. I only knew her during her second career - as a legend. Or, rather, a living legend. By the time I saw a Garbo film, it was already a classic. In college, Garbo and Bogey film festivals ranked high beside black turtleneck jerseys, jazz and espresso. Later, when I lived in New York, there were occasional sightings of Garbo.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 11, 1986 | By STUART D. BYKOFSKY, Daily News Staff Writer
"Where the River Runs Black," a drama starring Charles Durning and Alessandro Rabelo. Directed by Christopher Cain from a screenplay by Peter Silverman and Neal Jimenez. Running time: 96 minutes. An MGM release. At the Eric Rittenhouse III. Director John Boorman's "The Emerald Forest" was stunning because it surrendered itself to magic and mysticism in a tale of a young boy taken from civilization to the jungle by primitive South American Indians. Director Christopher Cain's "Where the River Runs Black" falls short because it resists throwing itself headlong into the story of a primitive South American Indian boy taken from the jungle to civilization by a well- meaning priest.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 26, 2001 | By Dominic Sama, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Roy Wilkins, the civil rights legend, once was asked what he did for a living, and he replied, "I work for Negroes. " Wilkins (1901-1981), whose reply may have sounded out of date to young blacks, was courtly, deliberate and thoughtful, and esteemed among the towering leaders of the civil rights movement of the 1950s and 1960s. Best remembered as the longtime executive secretary of the NAACP, Wilkins was honored Wednesday with a 34-cent commemorative in the Black Heritage Series by the U.S. Postal Service.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 21, 2009 | By David Hiltbrand INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's tough to squeeze fresh life out of a legend as overtilled as Camelot, but Merlin, a 13-part summer series on NBC, debuting tonight, finds a workable approach: Dial the traditional tale back a few decades and twist the premise. Forget the Round Table; say hello to the Kiddie Table. This BBC import, exceedingly handsome but poky, takes King Arthur and his wizard Merlin back to their days as shavers. Trivia note: NBC broadcast a TV movie with the same title and covering the same hallowed ground back in 1998.
NEWS
October 15, 2008
Matt Stairs has bounced around Major League Baseball, playing for 11 teams in 16 years. But with one swing of the bat, he's secured a place in Phillies history. Maybe he'll add a chapter in tonight's Game 5 of the National League Championship Series. The Phils lead the Los Angeles Dodgers 3 games to 1. One more win and they're in the World Series for the first time since 1993. Stairs launched a mammoth moon shot into the right-field seats at Dodger Stadium on Monday night that won Game 4 of the NLCS.
SPORTS
February 10, 2007 | Daily News Wire Services
Hank Bauer, the hard-nosed ex-Marine who returned to baseball after being wounded during World War II and went on to become a cornerstone of the New York Yankees dynasty of the 1950s, died yesterday. He was 84. Bauer died of cancer in Shawnee Mission, Kan., said the Orioles, whom he managed to their first World Series title in 1966. A three-time All-Star outfielder, Bauer played on Yankees teams that won nine American League pennants and seven World Series in 10 years. His Series record 17-game hitting streak still stands.
NEWS
October 29, 1986 | By Daniel LeDuc, Inquirer Staff Writer
Moss Mill Road used to be one of the main routes from Leeds Point to Camden back when it took farmers four days to take their crops by wagon to market. The little road has grown up since colonial days. Now smoothed of the wagon ruts of bygone days, it is freshly blacktopped. The road winds through the blueberry fields of Atlantic County, past the new condominiums for Atlantic City casino workers and out to the marshland that is the shoreline in this part of New Jersey. This time of year, leaves of spectacular shades of red, orange and yellow - looking more alive as they are ready to die than they ever did in the green of summer - form cheery canopies over Moss Mill Road.
NEWS
January 15, 1991 | By Jim Nicholson, Daily News Staff Writer
Joseph Paul Mark "Gunner" Gaskins, houseman at St. Anthony's Hall at the University of Pennsylvania for 47 years and a link to the past who kept cherished memories alive for old grads, died Thursday. He was 74 and lived in West Philadelphia. Gunner Gaskins started working in 1935 as an assistant chef at Delta Psi's fraternity house, St. Anthony's Hall. By the time he retired in 1984 he was St. Anthony's Hall. For nearly a half-century he was all things to all men: father confessor, big brother, jack-of-all-trades, pool and poker guru and friend.
NEWS
April 13, 1986 | By Tom Fox, Inquirer Editorial Board
Legends, like old soldiers, never die, but they don't fade away either. Legends grow with the fleeting years, adding even more romance and mystique to the myths, facts to the contrary. This is about such a legend, a legend about an Indian reservation at Broad and Walnut, where, Philadelphia lore holds, a small plot of ground was set aside in colonial times for visiting Indians. I recently learned of the legend when Russ O'Neill, who is big in hardware in Cape May, was in town for an eye check and topped off the day with dinner at the Union League with Bob Mendte, the ad man and historian.
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SPORTS
August 13, 2015 | BY MIKE KERN, Daily News Staff Writer kernm@phillynews.com
ON YESTERDAY'S annual preseason Ivy League coaches conference call, Al Bagnoli said the mid-October Penn-Columbia game in New York "will certainly . . . have a weird dynamic to it. " That's one way of pointing out the obvious. Bagnoli was Penn football for the last 23 seasons, a run that included nine titles. He stepped down after last season, which enabled Ray Priore to finally step in. The same Priore who's been at Penn since 1987, coaching linebackers, defensive ends, special teams and defensive backs.
NEWS
July 22, 2015
IT WAS A couple of decades ago, maybe more, at the Improv in L.A., back when it was still smoke-filled. Philadelphia's the Legendary Wid had just finished his set, recalls Steve Young, who was standing backstage next to the next comic to go on, Robin Williams. "How do I follow that? " Williams wondered aloud. Williams "meant it in a positive way. Wid was the best prop comedian ever, maybe still is," says Young, a comedian and one-time owner of Philly's Comedy Works. Williams broke through to stardom.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 2015 | By Molly Eichel, Inquirer Staff Writer
The last time his friends saw Glenn Milstead, he was waving from the balcony of his Los Angeles hotel room, singing "Arrivederci, Roma. " The next day, March 7, 1988, he was dead at 42 of cardiomegaly. He had died in his sleep; he weighed more than 300 pounds. The obituaries didn't just announce the death of Glenn Milstead; they marked the end of Divine, the larger-than-life "drag queen of the century," the trash goddess at the heart of such notorious films by director John Waters as Pink Flamingos , Female Trouble , and - teetering on the brink of respectability - Hairspray . The division between the queen and the man is at the heart of Divine/Intervention , a new play conceived by Braden Chapman and written by E. Dale Smith.
SPORTS
June 25, 2015 | BY MARK PERNER, Daily News Staff Writer pernerm@phillynews.com
HARVEY POLLACK was all about the numbers. And no one was better at recording them than he. Given the nickname "Super Stat" in 1966 by then- Bulletin sports writer George Kiseda, Pollack introduced terms including triple-double, blocked shots, assists and steals into the everyday basketball vernacular. But the numbers stopped yesterday, as Pollack passed away at the age of 93. Pollack was involved in a one-car accident on New Year's Day, after serving as a judge for the Mummers Parade, suffering numerous injuries.
SPORTS
June 7, 2015 | By Marc Narducci, Inquirer Staff Writer
NEW YORK - U.S. Women's national team soccer coach Jill Ellis went to the top when looking for coaching inspiration. Before joining U.S. Soccer full time, Ellis enjoyed a successful 12-year run as head coach at UCLA from 1999 to 2010. While coaching at UCLA, she received some never forgotten advice from the late John Wooden, the Wizard of Westwood, who guided the UCLA men's basketball team to 10 national titles in a 12-year period. Both Ellis, 48, and the national team are under immense pressure to earn America's first World Cup title since 1999.
NEWS
May 15, 2015 | By Ellen Gray
THE CW will add three new shows next season, including "DC's Legends of Tomorrow," drawn from the DC Comics universe of "Arrow" and "The Flash. " Only one new show, "My Crazy Ex-Girlfriend," will premiere this fall. In a conference call with reporters yesterday morning, shortly before presenting his plans to advertisers in New York, CW president Mark Pedowitz described that hourlong comedy, originally a Showtime pilot, as "a perfect companion piece" to "Jane the Virgin," which it will be paired with on Monday nights.
NEWS
April 3, 2015 | By Jenny DeHuff
HE'S WIDELY considered one of the most influential jazz pianists of the 20th century, and yesterday  McCoy Tyner was given the keys to the city - or our equivalent, a brass, mini Liberty Bell. Mayor Nutter recognized Tyner as the 2015 Jazz Legend Honoree during the fifth annual Philadelphia Jazz Appreciation Month, which celebrates Philly's jazz history with musical events throughout April. Tyner, originally from West Philly, is an icon in the jazz community, and has performed alongside musical greats such as John Coltrane , Miles Davis and Dizzy Gillespie . He has won four Grammys and has released nearly 80 albums under his name.
NEWS
April 1, 2015 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
During his 54-year career, Bill Fritz and the men and women he trained won enough championships, titles, and honors to fill a trophy room. Or a hall of fame. But what the beloved cross country and track and field coach most wants to show me is a black-and-white photo of his father, Eugene. "I can't say enough about him," says Fritz, 76, who retired from Rowan University in 2014 after coaching 69 NCAA Division 3 national champions, 277 All-Americans, and 44 NJAC champions. He also trained four-time NCAA champion javelin-thrower Mike Juskus.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 2015 | By Jenny DeHuff
EMMY AWARD-winning actress and comedian Vicki Lawrence was in town last week doing interviews and made the Daily News her first media stop. It was also her birthday, and at age 66 she looks as beautiful and energetic as ever. The former "Mama's Family" jokester was promoting awareness of chronic idiopathic urticaria, or CIU, a form of chronic hives having no known cause, with which she was diagnosed four years ago. "I woke up with my hands itching one morning, and I said to my husband, 'I want to jump off the balcony into the bay,' 'cause that sounds good - the cold water," Lawrence told me Thursday.
NEWS
February 20, 2015 | By Nick Cristiano, Inquirer Staff Writer
It wasn't Charlie Gracie's idea that he write his life story. The South Philadelphia native was one of the first stars of rock and roll, one who inspired numerous future superstars. But his life has contained not even a hint of the scandal and salaciousness that usually draw publishers to rock memoirs. "Why would you want to write about me?" the still-vibrant 78-year-old singer and guitarist says at the home in Drexel Hill he shares with his wife of 57 years, Joan. "I don't have anything spectacular outside of my music.
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