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Legend

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NEWS
April 20, 2009 | By A.D. Amorosi FOR THE INQUIRER
At Saturday's sold-out show at World Cafe Live, the Flatlanders showed they are both a great band and a legend at work. Joe Ely, Butch Hancock, and Jimmie Dale Gilmore shone as an ensemble and individually, a superb demonstration of why they are so revered. Throughout the 1970s, Waylon Jennings, Willie Nelson, and Kris Kristofferson - Texans all - eschewed country music's satin twang and Nudie suits to craft something bold. It was a stripped-down outlaw vibe of weary lyricism topped with whiskey, dope, woe, and social issues that transcended mere romance gone wrong.
NEWS
April 21, 1990 | By ELLEN GOODMAN
She made her last movie just before I was born. So I wasn't introduced to Garbo as a star. I never stepped in from the Depression to the romantic darkness of a movie theater and the exotic accent of a foreign woman. I only knew her during her second career - as a legend. Or, rather, a living legend. By the time I saw a Garbo film, it was already a classic. In college, Garbo and Bogey film festivals ranked high beside black turtleneck jerseys, jazz and espresso. Later, when I lived in New York, there were occasional sightings of Garbo.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 11, 1986 | By STUART D. BYKOFSKY, Daily News Staff Writer
"Where the River Runs Black," a drama starring Charles Durning and Alessandro Rabelo. Directed by Christopher Cain from a screenplay by Peter Silverman and Neal Jimenez. Running time: 96 minutes. An MGM release. At the Eric Rittenhouse III. Director John Boorman's "The Emerald Forest" was stunning because it surrendered itself to magic and mysticism in a tale of a young boy taken from civilization to the jungle by primitive South American Indians. Director Christopher Cain's "Where the River Runs Black" falls short because it resists throwing itself headlong into the story of a primitive South American Indian boy taken from the jungle to civilization by a well- meaning priest.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 26, 2001 | By Dominic Sama, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Roy Wilkins, the civil rights legend, once was asked what he did for a living, and he replied, "I work for Negroes. " Wilkins (1901-1981), whose reply may have sounded out of date to young blacks, was courtly, deliberate and thoughtful, and esteemed among the towering leaders of the civil rights movement of the 1950s and 1960s. Best remembered as the longtime executive secretary of the NAACP, Wilkins was honored Wednesday with a 34-cent commemorative in the Black Heritage Series by the U.S. Postal Service.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 21, 2009 | By David Hiltbrand INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's tough to squeeze fresh life out of a legend as overtilled as Camelot, but Merlin, a 13-part summer series on NBC, debuting tonight, finds a workable approach: Dial the traditional tale back a few decades and twist the premise. Forget the Round Table; say hello to the Kiddie Table. This BBC import, exceedingly handsome but poky, takes King Arthur and his wizard Merlin back to their days as shavers. Trivia note: NBC broadcast a TV movie with the same title and covering the same hallowed ground back in 1998.
NEWS
October 15, 2008
Matt Stairs has bounced around Major League Baseball, playing for 11 teams in 16 years. But with one swing of the bat, he's secured a place in Phillies history. Maybe he'll add a chapter in tonight's Game 5 of the National League Championship Series. The Phils lead the Los Angeles Dodgers 3 games to 1. One more win and they're in the World Series for the first time since 1993. Stairs launched a mammoth moon shot into the right-field seats at Dodger Stadium on Monday night that won Game 4 of the NLCS.
SPORTS
February 10, 2007 | Daily News Wire Services
Hank Bauer, the hard-nosed ex-Marine who returned to baseball after being wounded during World War II and went on to become a cornerstone of the New York Yankees dynasty of the 1950s, died yesterday. He was 84. Bauer died of cancer in Shawnee Mission, Kan., said the Orioles, whom he managed to their first World Series title in 1966. A three-time All-Star outfielder, Bauer played on Yankees teams that won nine American League pennants and seven World Series in 10 years. His Series record 17-game hitting streak still stands.
NEWS
October 29, 1986 | By Daniel LeDuc, Inquirer Staff Writer
Moss Mill Road used to be one of the main routes from Leeds Point to Camden back when it took farmers four days to take their crops by wagon to market. The little road has grown up since colonial days. Now smoothed of the wagon ruts of bygone days, it is freshly blacktopped. The road winds through the blueberry fields of Atlantic County, past the new condominiums for Atlantic City casino workers and out to the marshland that is the shoreline in this part of New Jersey. This time of year, leaves of spectacular shades of red, orange and yellow - looking more alive as they are ready to die than they ever did in the green of summer - form cheery canopies over Moss Mill Road.
NEWS
January 15, 1991 | By Jim Nicholson, Daily News Staff Writer
Joseph Paul Mark "Gunner" Gaskins, houseman at St. Anthony's Hall at the University of Pennsylvania for 47 years and a link to the past who kept cherished memories alive for old grads, died Thursday. He was 74 and lived in West Philadelphia. Gunner Gaskins started working in 1935 as an assistant chef at Delta Psi's fraternity house, St. Anthony's Hall. By the time he retired in 1984 he was St. Anthony's Hall. For nearly a half-century he was all things to all men: father confessor, big brother, jack-of-all-trades, pool and poker guru and friend.
NEWS
April 13, 1986 | By Tom Fox, Inquirer Editorial Board
Legends, like old soldiers, never die, but they don't fade away either. Legends grow with the fleeting years, adding even more romance and mystique to the myths, facts to the contrary. This is about such a legend, a legend about an Indian reservation at Broad and Walnut, where, Philadelphia lore holds, a small plot of ground was set aside in colonial times for visiting Indians. I recently learned of the legend when Russ O'Neill, who is big in hardware in Cape May, was in town for an eye check and topped off the day with dinner at the Union League with Bob Mendte, the ad man and historian.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 23, 2016 | By Jerome Maida, FOR PHILLY.COM/GEEK
Comic book legend Chuck Dixon has written a crime novel and it's set in Philadelphia. Shrinkage is a about a shoplifter named Jeff who gets involved in a series of escalating adventures in Dixon's take on the City of Brotherly Love in the 1970s. "I grew up in Philly and the western suburbs," Dixon said. "Most of my jobs were in the city. I had Jeff's job as a stock boy. It was at John Wanamakers. The opening scene of the novel is a day I recall very well. I wanted this novel to be less fanciful than the others I've written so I turned to what I knew.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 2016 | By R. Eric Thomas, FOR DoTHIS
Barbra Streisand has done it all. In her six-decade career, she has been a singer, an actress, an activist, a director, and an urban legend. She is, in short, everything. Babs was Celine before Celine, she was Beyoncé before Beyoncé (sacrilege, yes, but true). She's a pioneer, and, at 74, she's not done yet. In honor of her stop Saturday at Philadelphia's Wells Fargo Center - only the sixth tour of her career - let's look back at some of her most defining moments. Miss Marmelstein Babs burst onto Broadway with a bang in the 1962 musical I Can Get It For You Wholesale . Much of the musical, set in New York's Garment District and using Jewish harmonies in its pop-music score, was remarkable, but Streisand's tour-de-force performance as the secretary Miss Marmelstein and her eponymous song remain the stuff of legends.
NEWS
August 3, 2016 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Any Philadelphian who knows sports knows Ray Didinger. A statesman of football reportage, he's penned locker-room reports and gridiron stories for the Philadelphia Bulletin and Daily News, along with several colorful books. Didinger is on the honor roll of the Pro Football Hall of Fame, and is a respected member of Comcast SportsNet's Eagles Post Game Live and the WIP radio roster. "The Eagles locker room is to me what the Mississippi River was to Mark Twain," says Didinger. "I never tire of it. " His is not a name you'd expect to see in Philly's arts pages.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 2016 | By Molly Eichel, Staff Writer
How do you solve a problem like Tarzan? In the updated version The Legend of Tarzan , the Lord of the Jungle gets a feminist Jane and an African-American sidekick. But is that enough to make Edgar Rice Burroughs' story feel like it's not firmly planted in a bygone century? True Blood 's Alexander Skarsgård takes on the role this time, and, in a way, he's perfect for it. The Swede is muscled, lean, and blond, and spends a lot of time look plaintive. The famed Jane is played by Margot Robbie, an actress who is so full of onscreen vivaciousness that her character's newfound independence is a perfect fit. Unlike a lot of reboots, The Legend of Tarzan opts to tell a new tale, rather than revert to the origin story.
NEWS
May 26, 2016 | By Chris Palmer and Stephanie Farr, STAFF WRITERS
"Capone," they called Edwin Laboy in the Badlands, a North Philadelphia corner hustler with nine lives. He survived an assassination attempt when a notorious hit man sprayed bullets from an AK-47 into his car. He even lived after gang members kidnapped him and tried to pull out his teeth with pliers. But last month, Laboy, 46, whose street name echoed through the underworld for nearly three decades, met his end in the city's most violent homicide of the year. Authorities said a schizophrenic with a shotgun fired at five people inside a Kensington rowhouse, leaving three of them - a mother of three, a 46-year-old laborer, and Laboy - dead on the floor.
NEWS
May 2, 2016
ISSUE | LABOR A pioneer and legend The Philadelphia building trades mourn the loss of Samuel Staten Sr., 80, the former business manager of Laborers Local 332, former secretary-treasurer of the Laborers' District Council of the Metropolitan Area of Philadelphia and Vicinity, and a pioneer of the city's labor community. Staten was a legend in the labor and civic communities. He was more than a mentor; he was an inspiration to me and countless other labor leaders in this city. His courage, leadership, and vision helped make Philadelphia one of the nation's great union towns.
NEWS
April 24, 2016 | By Tia S. Yang, Staff Writer
Local advertising legend Les Waas, 94, the man responsible for two of the most recognizable tunes ever heard in Philadelphia - the Mr. Softee jingle and "Everybody Who Knows Goes to Melrose" - died Tuesday, April 19, of pneumonia at Abington Hospice in Warminster. He was a Philly native and a Philly original. A graduate of Olney High School (Class of 1939), a sheet-metal worker at the Navy Yard, a World War II Army Air Corps pilot, and a world-class prankster, Mr. Waas turned a knack for writing jingles into an enduring legacy.
NEWS
March 7, 2016 | By Kevin Riordan, Columnist
Kal Rudman, the music maven and Philadelphia philanthropist, offers me a piece of paper and a bit of advice. "You should open your column," he says, "with this . " The email that's already been printed out for me is from a grateful Philly high school student, and is noteworthy indeed. But first, I have a few questions for Rudman, who turns 86 on Sunday - and whose philanthropic mission is, like his taste in pop music, catholic. Despite his having been "born Jewish, but only on my mother's . . . and father's side," he says, savoring the punch line.
SPORTS
February 29, 2016 | By Phil Anastasia, Staff Writer
Camden senior Jamal Holloway will sometimes post inspiration sayings on Twitter. Last week, Holloway wrote, "When you want something you've never had, you have to do something you've never done. " For Holloway and his friend, classmate and two-sport teammate Brad Hawkins, those words ring especially true at this stage of their scholastic careers. Holloway and Hawkins have been among the most accomplished two-sport athletes in recent Camden High School history. They have been four-year starters in basketball for teams that have won a combined 89 games and three South Jersey titles entering this season's state tournament.
NEWS
February 7, 2016 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Staff Writer
For William Earle Williams, it was just a gate, distinct from the imposing stone pillars that flank the other entryways to Haverford College, but still just a gate. The limestone columns, with attached benches, along Old Railroad Avenue were graceful, light, and simple. They invited passersby to sit, rather than simply walk through. For decades, Haverford students, staff, and visitors had no idea that the Edward B. Conklin Memorial gate was the work of one of the nation's most influential and underappreciated architectural designers.
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