CollectionsLegislative Seat
IN THE NEWS

Legislative Seat

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
February 2, 1992 | By Mac Daniel, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
Abington's Second Ward commissioner, Martin Laub, has been endorsed by the township's Republican Committee to run in the April primary to fill the 153d District state legislative seat left vacant by his third cousin, county Commissioner Jon D. Fox. Laub was endorsed Wednesday night with 56 of a possible 73 votes. Fox resigned his seat last month after he was elected county commissioner. Being related to the man he hopes to replace in Harrisburg won't be a drawback, Laub said, adding that he does not plan to ride on Fox's coattails.
NEWS
February 5, 1988 | By Tom Infield, Inquirer Staff Writer
Former state Rep. James D. Barber, an 18-year legislative veteran who lost his seat in 1986 to Vincent Hughes, who is 35 years his junior, said yesterday that he wants a rematch. City Democratic Chairman Robert A. Brady and other party leaders have been urging Barber not to take on Hughes for the sake of party unity, according to sources. Barber had been telling people in party circles that he had been wrestling with his decision. Yesterday, though, Barber was emphatic and to the point.
NEWS
November 4, 1998 | By Mark Binker, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Republican Charles T. "Chuck" McIlhinney apparently won a squeaker in Bucks County's most closely contested race, leading the list of Republican incumbents who will keep their seats in the legislature. The election between McIlhinney and Democrat Henry Rowan was a rematch of February's special election in the Republican-dominated 143d House District and the culmination of almost a year of debate on how to control Bucks County's rapid growth. "It was a very close race, but we pulled it out in the end," McIlhinney said, addressing a cheering crowd at the GOP's Bucks County headquarters about 10 p.m. Aside from thanking his parents and supporters, McIlhinney, who won by about 200 votes in the final unofficial count, did not comment on what had become a rancorous race in recent weeks.
NEWS
November 8, 1990 | By S.E. Siebert, Special to The Inquirer
Republican State Rep. Roy W. Cornell has retained his six-term legislative seat in the 152d District, defeating Democratic challenger Dennis E. Kapustin by a 2-1 ratio. The district covers towns in both Bucks and Montgomery Counties, including most of Upper Southampton Township. Cornell, 46, said his victory reflected voter confidence in him. But he said that voter distress over incumbents, in general, had narrowed the 3-1 gap he enjoyed during elections four years ago. He was unopposed in 1988.
NEWS
May 12, 1999 | By Karen E. Quinones Miller, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Last November, Anthony H. Williams won two elections on the same day. He was reelected to his state House seat and elected to the state Senate seat recently vacated by his father, Hardy Williams. The younger Williams opted to vacate his House seat and move up to the Senate. On Tuesday, voters in the 191st Legislative District, which covers parts of West and Southwest Philadelphia and Yeadon in Delaware County, will choose a new state representative in a special election. The winner will be sworn in as soon as the election results are certified and will serve the balance of Williams' unexpired term - until January 2001.
NEWS
April 26, 2004 | By Larry Lewis INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Three-term State Rep. Mary Ann Dailey of Lower Pottsgrove was a nursing professor before she was elected to represent Montgomery County's booming western end in 1998. As a Republican legislator and the first woman to represent the 146th Legislative District, Dailey, 55, focused on health care, helping create laws to prevent accidental needle sticks among health-care workers and to address medical errors. But now Dailey plans to return to teaching and will not seek reelection, leaving the primary field wide open in a district that stretches across Pottstown, Limerick, Royersford, part of New Hanover, and all of Upper, Lower and West Pottsgrove Townships.
NEWS
February 18, 1988 | By Susan Warner, Inquirer Staff Writer
Two Lower Merion residents have filed to run for the seat being vacated by state Rep. Richard McClatchy (R., Montgomery) after 20 years. Democrat Mark Newberger, of Penn Wynne, a Lower Merion commissioner, and Republican James Clark of Rosemont have filed to run for election in the 149th District, which consists of Upper Merion, Bridgeport and parts of Lower Merion. Newberger, 35, was elected to the Board of Commissioners in 1985 and is chairman of the board's Assessments and Procedures Committee.
NEWS
May 20, 2003 | By Wendy Ruderman INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For State Sen. John J. Matheussen, yesterday's Senate session was much like those he has attended for the last 11 years. He presided over a committee he cochairs. He attended a closed-door caucus with fellow Republicans. He voted on bills and gave speeches from the Senate floor. But he wasn't supposed to be there. And some Republicans wished he hadn't come. More than a month after becoming chief executive of the Delaware River Port Authority, Matheussen (R., Gloucester)
NEWS
October 27, 1994 | By Christine Bahls, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Four years ago, a young lawyer named Michael Fitzpatrick challenged Democrat Anthony Melio, the longtime Bristol politician, for his legislative seat in the 141st District. Fitzpatrick lost by an 18 percent margin in a district that has a 2-to-1 Democratic-to-Republican registration. This year he's trying again. The one thing he has learned since losing the 1990 race, Fitzpatrick said, is that he has to work harder. "I didn't think that would be possible," he said Monday.
NEWS
January 5, 2010 | By Joelle Farrell INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Yesterday, he attended his first meeting as a County Council member in Media, Delaware County. Today, he's due back in Harrisburg to talk table games. And though State Rep. Mario J. Civera Jr. said last year that he had no plans or desire to work both jobs, the Upper Darby Republican has not said when he will step down from the Capitol. "My intentions are to retire, but I'm not going to give a date," he said yesterday after his swearing-in as a Delaware County Council member.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
November 27, 2012 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - His first love may have been baseball, but for the newly elected state auditor general, Eugene DePasquale, politics runs a close second. DePasquale's late grandfather was a popular, pothole-fixing city councilman in Pittsburgh who got things done the old-fashioned way - backroom deals and favors. Next month at age 41, the three-term Democratic state lawmaker takes office as Pennsylvania's top fiscal watchdog. DePasquale was first elected to the state House in the aftermath of the legislative pay-raise scandal of 2005.
NEWS
April 25, 2012 | By Angela Couloumbis, INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
HARRISBURG — In the span of several hours Tuesday, former top House Democrat Bill DeWeese quit his legislative seat, attempted to win it back, and was sentenced to 2-1/2 to five years in prison for crimes committed while he was in office. DeWeese, 62, resigned the seat he held for nearly 36 years shortly before a judge sentenced him for theft and other political corruption convictions stemming from the wide-ranging "Bonusgate "investigation in the Capitol. He was also ordered to pay $25,000 in fines and $116,000 in restitution to the state.
NEWS
February 17, 2012 | By Bob Warner, Inquirer Staff Writer
The fight to fill City Councilman Dennis O'Brien's old seat in the state House has attracted an unusually large field of six candidates - half from York County, about 100 miles from the Northeast Philadelphia district that O'Brien represented for 35 years. It's a sign of the continuing confusion over how the state's legislative redistricting drama will play out, though all signs point to O'Brien's district remaining in Philadelphia as long as the state's April 24 primary takes place on schedule.
NEWS
January 30, 2012 | By Angela Couloumbis, INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
HARRISBURG - It was business as usual. Everyone did it. Working on politics during the legislative day was just a part of the daily grind in the state Capitol. And though State Rep. Bill DeWeese was the top House Democrat during much of the time it went on, he was merely "a figurehead," leaving the day-to-day legislative operations to others. So testified William G. Chadwick Jr., a former prosecutor and state inspector general, and the first witness called to the stand Monday morning to begin DeWeese's defense.
NEWS
November 6, 2011 | By Joelle Farrell, Inquirer Staff Writer
  With New Jersey's unemployment rate above 9 percent, most pollsters expect economic woes to influence the state's voters when they head to the polls Tuesday. All 120 legislative seats are up, but only a handful of races are considered truly competitive, and unless the GOP pulls off an unexpected miracle, pundits don't expect Democrats will lose control of either chamber. With no governor's race atop the ticket, turnout is expected to be light for an election that also features county and municipal races.
NEWS
October 23, 2011
Allen M. Hornblum is a narrative historian whose latest book, The Invisible Harry Gold: The Man Who Gave the Soviets the Atom Bomb, is now out in paperback (Yale) The controversy over whether State Rep. Dwight Evans (D., Phila.) strong-armed members of the School Reform Commission to favor one educational vendor over another in directing the affairs of Martin Luther King High School may remind some of the old Huey Long line: "The man who pulls the plow gets the plunder in politics.
NEWS
October 3, 2011 | By Maya Rao, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
As a New Jersey Senate committee considered a raft of economic bills on Sept. 22, business lobbyist David Brogan went before lawmakers to praise their work. "We are encouraged by the fact that we are focusing on jobs," said Brogan, vice president of the New Jersey Business and Industry Association. "It's a very difficult fiscal environment out there and our businesses are hurting. " Noting that the Democratic-controlled Legislature had passed two bills earlier in the year to ease millions in corporate taxes for small businesses and large corporations that sell to national markets, Brogan added, "Some of those [bill]
NEWS
January 5, 2010 | By Joelle Farrell INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Yesterday, he attended his first meeting as a County Council member in Media, Delaware County. Today, he's due back in Harrisburg to talk table games. And though State Rep. Mario J. Civera Jr. said last year that he had no plans or desire to work both jobs, the Upper Darby Republican has not said when he will step down from the Capitol. "My intentions are to retire, but I'm not going to give a date," he said yesterday after his swearing-in as a Delaware County Council member.
NEWS
December 1, 2009 | By Amy Worden INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
Last week, Rep. Mario Civera, the ranking Republican on the House Appropriations Committee, said he was "tying up loose ends" before resigning from his legislative seat to take his new job as a Delaware County Council member. Now, after a surprising request from Gov. Rendell, Civera said yesterday he was all but certain that he would stay on to complete next year's budget. He was talking about the one that is required to be approved next summer. And lawmakers have yet to wrap up remaining elements of this year's spending plan, which was adopted Oct. 9, 101 days late.
NEWS
May 24, 2006 | By Thomas Fitzgerald INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The outsider on the ballot held a narrow - but seemingly insurmountable - lead over the party-endorsed write-in candidate yesterday in the Philadelphia city commissioners' counting of the votes in last week's Democratic primary in the 179th State House District. Tony Payton Jr. was ahead of Emilio Vazquez by 29 votes after absentee and provisional ballots were unsealed and counted. The unofficial total: 962 votes for Payton and 933 for Vazquez. An additional 11 write-in votes were cast in the election, but they have not yet been counted because the tapes that recorded the votes remained stuck inside voting machines yesterday.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|