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NEWS
November 3, 1988 | By Russell E. Eshleman Jr., Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
In one instance, it's a case of too late. In the other, it's a case of too little. Nevertheless, voters in Erie and Reading next week will have the opportunity to show government officials how they feel about two key issues in their areas - the worthiness of the state legislature and the fight against drugs - in a pair of notable, but nonbinding, ballot questions. In Erie County, voters on Tuesday will be able to register their objections or support for the middle-of-the-night pay increase the General Assembly gave itself and other state officials last year.
NEWS
May 8, 2007
AMENDING the state constitution to enact term limits for the Legislature similar to those already imposed on the governor has supporters and detractors. While there are valid points on both sides, you wouldn't expect a politician who, in the dark of night, voted to raise his own salary to have the audacity to oppose giving the public some form of constitutional protection against politicians who cast votes and exploit the benefits of office in an attempt to remain in power indefinitely.
NEWS
October 24, 2003 | By Christine Flowers
In the tragedies of Aeschylus, Euripides and Sophocles, conflicts between human beings were often resolved by the "deus ex machina," the unexpected and inexplicable hand of the Olympian gods. Wednesday, a contemporary calamity was likewise resolved (or, depending on your viewpoint, further complicated) by the hand of the Florida state legislature. A last-minute initiative, which passed both the Senate and the House by comfortable margins, authorized a hospital in Clearwater, Fla., to resume giving fluids to Terri Schiavo, a brain-damaged woman who has become the center of a national debate on the right to die. Schiavo, a Huntingdon Valley native who has been in a persistent vegetative state for over a decade, does not fit neatly into any category.
NEWS
November 7, 2007
  State Senate Mark Cimino (R). . . 20,560 Stephen M. Sweeney (D). . . 29,613   State Assembly Electing two. Phil Donohue (R). . . 19,454 Jeffrey Stepler (R). . . 18,864 John Burzichelli (D). . . 29,936 Douglas Fisher (D). . . 29,799   State Senate 99 percent of the vote. Shelly Lovett (R). . . 14,105 Fred Madden (D). . . 20,799   State Assembly Electing two. Patricia Fratticcioli (R). . . 15,397 Patricia Fratticcioli (R)
NEWS
April 21, 2008
FIRST SENATORIAL DISTRICT ANNE DICKER HOUSE DISTRICTS 172nd: RICHARD COSTELLO 179th: GUY D. LEWIS 184th: CHRISTIAN DiCICCO 186th: KENYATTA JOHNSON 198th: BYRON DAVIS
NEWS
October 2, 2014
LET'S TALK about the focus of the governor's race. Specifically, let's talk about how the focus underplays or outright misses a couple of critical questions. Republican Tom Corbett and Democrat Tom Wolf spar over school spending, taxes, pension reform and more. But little or nothing is said about relationships with the Legislature. You remember the Legislature? That's the place where governors go to get policy enacted: education policy, tax policy, pension policy and more.
NEWS
November 23, 1990 | By John M. Baer, Daily News Staff Writer
With Philadelphia looking for help from the state Legislature to ease its fiscal crisis, the Legislature has adjourned for the year without taking action. But it didn't leave the Capitol without acting on other matters. In its final days, the Legislature passed: A measure to get tough on stuffed-toy makers by hiking fines from $300 to $1,000 for those who fail to meet the quality standards of the Stuffed Toy Manufacturing Act. A "potty parity" bill requiring government buildings and other facilities to have more restrooms for women than men because research shows women use restrooms longer.
NEWS
January 8, 2015 | By Angela Couloumbis and Amy Worden, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - The 199th Pennsylvania legislative session opened Tuesday with lawmakers in the House and Senate being sworn in to first or new terms. Rep. Mike Turzai (R., Allegheny) won a standing ovation from his colleagues after being unanimously elected speaker. Senators also took their oaths, and President Joe Scarnati (R., Jefferson) was unanimously reelected. Both chambers begin the two-year session with stronger Republican majorities: the 50-member Senate has 30 GOP members and the 203-member House of Representatives 119. That makeup is bound to set the stage for showdowns with incoming Democratic governor Tom Wolf, who takes office Jan. 20. Among the priorities for the legislature and Wolf will be figuring out how to close an estimated $2 billion budget deficit.
NEWS
December 30, 2013 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG Just over a year ago, Gov. Corbett told an audience at a Pennsylvania Press Club luncheon that his top priorities for 2013 were addressing the state pension crisis and privatizing state liquor stores. Neither has come to pass. But while the Republican governor has struggled to move his bills in a legislature controlled by his own party, racked up several major losses in court, and been unable to shake low poll numbers, he did score a late-year legislative victory with the passage of a long-awaited transportation funding bill.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 12, 2016 | By David O'Reilly, Staff Writer
Large and illicit heaps of discarded tires are reappearing around New Jersey, a state auditor's study has found, and the report is urging a renewed effort to "monitor, identify, and remediate" them. "Scrap tires are not only an eyesore, but also present an environmental and public-health threat," State Auditor Stephen Eells wrote in an Aug. 22 memo to Gov. Christie and legislative leaders. Eells' office found that the colossal mountains of abandoned tires that once dotted the landscape were now gone, with "the vast majority" of used tires ultimately recycled.
NEWS
July 15, 2016
THE AGREEMENT on the $31.5 billion state budget nearly met the July 1 deadline, nine months earlier than last year. That must come as a tremendous relief to school districts and local governments across the state that had to go through 2015 without regular payments of state aid. Now, they know what they are getting from the state and can plan accordingly. The Philadelphia School District, for instance, will get about $50 million in new money, which it had already penciled in to its budget for the 2016-17 school year.
NEWS
July 13, 2016
Gov. Wolf says he will allow a $31.5 billion spending bill to become law without his signature, but it can't rightly be called a state budget because the legislature hasn't decided how to pay for it. It could be described as half a budget, a spending plan to nowhere, or another mostly empty gesture from Harrisburg. But it isn't a budget, and it won't be until lawmakers agree on the taxes and other revenues that allow the state to function. Intentionally or not, the Democratic governor has stepped out of the Republican-controlled legislature's way and is allowing it to race toward a brick wall of its own construction.
NEWS
July 12, 2016 | By Angela Couloumbis, HARRISBURG BUREAU
HARRISBURG - In an unexpected move that immediately raised a host of legal questions, Gov. Wolf said Sunday that he will allow the $31.5 billion spending plan the legislature has sent him to become law - even though there is no plan to pay for it. The governor has until 11:59 p.m. Monday to decide whether to sign or veto - in whole or in part - the spending plan that the Republican-controlled legislature approved just hours before the July 1...
NEWS
July 9, 2016 | By Angela Couloumbis, HARRISBURG BUREAU
HARRISBURG - The GOP-controlled legislature was within its powers when it approved an eleventh-hour delay - and rewording - of a ballot question raising the mandatory retirement age for judges, a Commonwealth Court panel has ruled. A three-judge panel found that the legislature acted properly when it approved the delay just weeks before the April 26 primary, when the question was initially scheduled to appear on the ballot. Legislators sought the delay because they said they believed the wording was obscure and confusing.
NEWS
June 29, 2016 | By Maddie Hanna, TRENTON BUREAU
TRENTON - Lawmakers on Monday passed legislation intended to spur sales of so-called smart guns and prevent Gov. Christie's administration from making it easier to get permits to carry guns. A third gun-related vote - to override the Republican governor's veto of a bill that would require domestic violence offenders and subjects of domestic violence restraining orders to surrender firearms - was postponed until Thursday because a Democratic senator was absent. Monday's gun votes were largely along party lines in the Democratic-controlled Legislature, with both houses approving a measure that would require gun retailers to sell at least one type of smart gun in stores.
NEWS
June 28, 2016 | By Andrew Seidman, TRENTON BUREAU
New Jersey is about to boycott a boycott movement against Israel. Lawmakers on Monday are expected to pass legislation that would prohibit the state Treasury Department from investing public employee pension funds in companies that boycott Israel as part of the so-called "boycott, divestment, and sanctions" movement. It would join about a dozen other states that have taken similar action, most recently New York, where Gov. Andrew Cuomo this month signed an executive order requiring divestment of public funds from companies that have engaged in the BDS campaign against Israel.
NEWS
June 18, 2016 | By Maddie Hanna, TRENTON BUREAU
Debate over guns resumed in Trenton on Thursday, as Democrats challenged Gov. Christie and sought to tighten New Jersey's laws. Backed by advocates, Senate President Stephen Sweeney announced plans to try to override the Republican governor's veto of a bill that would require domestic violence offenders to surrender firearms. In light of last weekend's massacre at a gay nightclub in Orlando, "if that doesn't send a signal that we need to do more with our gun laws to protect our citizens, I don't know what does," said Sweeney (D., Gloucester)
NEWS
June 17, 2016 | By Andrew Maykuth, STAFF WRITER
The state legislature on Wednesday approved controversial new rules to reduce the surface impacts of oil and gas drilling after Gov. Wolf agreed to exclude the conventional gas industry from the revisions. The new regulations, five years in the making, will apply to "unconventional" oil and gas drilling, which includes shale-gas development using hydraulic fracturing. Conventional drillers, a politically powerful group that includes many traditional small operators, had objected to new rules.
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