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Lemon

FOOD
February 9, 1994 | by Barbara Gibbons, Special to the Daily News
Good advice for Valentine's Day: Keep your love alive! That means no artery-clogging, blood-sugar-raising, hypertension-inducing meals. By avoiding excess fat, sugar and salt, our Slim Gourmet Valentine Treats cost fewer calories . . . no "love handles" as the price to pay! HEARTY STUFFED SOLE 2 pounds fillet of sole 1 1/2 cups shredded carrots 1/2 cup chopped onion 2 tablespoons minced fresh parsley 4 1/2 cups homemade croutons (see note) 1 tablespoon parmesan cheese 1/4 teaspoon dried thyme Optional: lemon pepper to taste 2 tablespoons dry white wine (or lemon juice)
FOOD
January 20, 2011 | By Dianna Marder, Inquirer Staff Writer
  After three years, a crippling recession, and an armed robbery, Under the Oak Cafe in East Oak Lane is more than enduring - it is expanding, with Saturday morning cooking classes, Friday night gourmet dinners, and a newly hired, French-trained chef. The cafe, opened in 2008 by the husband-and-wife team of Robert and Kelly McShain Tyree, plus Kelly's brother, Devitt McShain, sits on an isolated street with almost no foot traffic. "It was definitely a risk. People told us we were crazy to open here," says Kelly Tyree, who was raised in East Oak Lane and lives there still.
FOOD
March 20, 1991 | By Gerald Etter, Inquirer Food Writer
Three virtues of chicken breasts: They can be prepared quickly, they are compatible with numerous flavor combinations and, when skinless, they are virtually fat-free. Because chicken marries so well with most ingredients, it can be prepared several times a week and yield distinctly different dishes. Varying the foods that accompany chicken also can help set each meal apart. For a quick dinner with Middle Eastern overtones, chicken in a lemon-caper sauce can be prepared in about 20 minutes.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 2012 | Anna Herman
6 cups blueberries, rinsed and picked over Sugar to taste, approximately ½ cup Zest of one lemon, optional Basic Buttermilk Dough recipe, below     1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Butter a 9-by-13-inch baking dish, or equivalent. 2. Add the berries to the pan. Add sugar to taste. Add lemon zest if using. Toss gently to mix. 3. Make 12 balls of dough and place in an arrangement on top of the berries. Press gently with moist fingers to flatten slightly.
FOOD
November 23, 2011
Makes 4 sandwiches For aioli: 2 egg yolks 1 chipotle pepper, soaked in       1/2 cup water 3/4 cup vegetable oil 1/2 cup cooked sweet    potatoes 1 tablespoon honey For fig dressing: 4 figs 1 teaspoon minced shallot 2 cups white balsamic    vinegar 1 cup olive oil Juice from half a lemon...
FOOD
December 29, 2011
These nectarous, Brooklyn-made syrups have all the attributes one could hope for: made by hand, in small batches, with only organic, fair-trade ingredients. And delicious. The flavors, such as lavender-lemon and cardamom-clove, can punch up anything from cocktails to coffee to cookies. - Ashley Primis Royal Rose Simple Syrup, $12, at Art in the Age, 116 N. 3rd St., 215-922-2600, artintheage.com .  
ENTERTAINMENT
July 24, 2002 | By LAUREN MCCUTCHEON For the Daily News
There's an old trick restaurant chefs use when they share a recipe. They leave out one important ingredient. This omission ensures that the chef's dish can't be exactly duplicated - and that anyone who follows the recipe still comes back to the restaurant for the original version. But Valerie Blum, owner of Cafe Lutecia, isn't afraid to reveal the secret ingredient that makes her toasted sandwiches so tasty. After 12 years owning the little corner cafe at 23rd and Lombard streets, Blum (pronounced "Bloom")
FOOD
August 23, 2007
Vintage veggie Little lemon cucumbers are making a comeback. The pale yellow cukes - in season now - are juicy and sweet, with succulent white flesh. They have a bigger seed cavity than traditional cucumbers. And no, they don't taste at all like lemons. Pictured here are lemon cukes from Weavers Way Co-op grown from seeds dating back to 1890. Lemon cucumbers, 95 cents a pound at the Fair Food Farm Stand at Reading Terminal Market or area farmer's markets. - Dianna Marder Sweet salsa Don't be confused by the label "jam.
FOOD
July 26, 1992 | By Betty Rosbottom, FOR THE INQUIRER
Several days ago an assistant at my cooking school came to work excited about a forthcoming party. Some friends had moved into a new house and had asked a group over for dinner, and the guests had decided to bring the appetizers and desserts as housewarming gifts. My assistant asked if I would help her create a special appetizer. She had only one requirement, which was that the dish be made with Brie, a favorite cheese of the hosts. Immediately I thought of Baked Brie Stuffed With Asparagus and Pistachios.
FOOD
January 1, 1992 | By Betty Rosbottom, Special to The Inquirer
Several years ago, my husband and I decided to forgo large New Year's Day celebrations in favor of small dinners shared with close friends. Now, this event has become a tradition for us. The format remains the same every year. The dinner is always at our house, and I am responsible for preparing the appetizers and the entrees. Our friends bring side dishes, salad and dessert. Since everyone shares in the cooking, we can each spend a little extra time on our individual dishes.
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