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IN THE NEWS

Lemon

ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 2012 | Anna Herman
6 cups blueberries, rinsed and picked over Sugar to taste, approximately ½ cup Zest of one lemon, optional Basic Buttermilk Dough recipe, below     1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Butter a 9-by-13-inch baking dish, or equivalent. 2. Add the berries to the pan. Add sugar to taste. Add lemon zest if using. Toss gently to mix. 3. Make 12 balls of dough and place in an arrangement on top of the berries. Press gently with moist fingers to flatten slightly.
FOOD
December 29, 2011
These nectarous, Brooklyn-made syrups have all the attributes one could hope for: made by hand, in small batches, with only organic, fair-trade ingredients. And delicious. The flavors, such as lavender-lemon and cardamom-clove, can punch up anything from cocktails to coffee to cookies. - Ashley Primis Royal Rose Simple Syrup, $12, at Art in the Age, 116 N. 3rd St., 215-922-2600, artintheage.com .  
FOOD
November 23, 2011
Makes 4 sandwiches For aioli: 2 egg yolks 1 chipotle pepper, soaked in       1/2 cup water 3/4 cup vegetable oil 1/2 cup cooked sweet    potatoes 1 tablespoon honey For fig dressing: 4 figs 1 teaspoon minced shallot 2 cups white balsamic    vinegar 1 cup olive oil Juice from half a lemon...
ENTERTAINMENT
July 24, 2002 | By LAUREN MCCUTCHEON For the Daily News
There's an old trick restaurant chefs use when they share a recipe. They leave out one important ingredient. This omission ensures that the chef's dish can't be exactly duplicated - and that anyone who follows the recipe still comes back to the restaurant for the original version. But Valerie Blum, owner of Cafe Lutecia, isn't afraid to reveal the secret ingredient that makes her toasted sandwiches so tasty. After 12 years owning the little corner cafe at 23rd and Lombard streets, Blum (pronounced "Bloom")
FOOD
August 23, 2007
Vintage veggie Little lemon cucumbers are making a comeback. The pale yellow cukes - in season now - are juicy and sweet, with succulent white flesh. They have a bigger seed cavity than traditional cucumbers. And no, they don't taste at all like lemons. Pictured here are lemon cukes from Weavers Way Co-op grown from seeds dating back to 1890. Lemon cucumbers, 95 cents a pound at the Fair Food Farm Stand at Reading Terminal Market or area farmer's markets. - Dianna Marder Sweet salsa Don't be confused by the label "jam.
FOOD
July 26, 1992 | By Betty Rosbottom, FOR THE INQUIRER
Several days ago an assistant at my cooking school came to work excited about a forthcoming party. Some friends had moved into a new house and had asked a group over for dinner, and the guests had decided to bring the appetizers and desserts as housewarming gifts. My assistant asked if I would help her create a special appetizer. She had only one requirement, which was that the dish be made with Brie, a favorite cheese of the hosts. Immediately I thought of Baked Brie Stuffed With Asparagus and Pistachios.
FOOD
January 1, 1992 | By Betty Rosbottom, Special to The Inquirer
Several years ago, my husband and I decided to forgo large New Year's Day celebrations in favor of small dinners shared with close friends. Now, this event has become a tradition for us. The format remains the same every year. The dinner is always at our house, and I am responsible for preparing the appetizers and the entrees. Our friends bring side dishes, salad and dessert. Since everyone shares in the cooking, we can each spend a little extra time on our individual dishes.
NEWS
July 2, 1999 | by Robert Strauss, For the Daily News
Q: Mosquitoes! We live near a creek, and assume the water is attracting these pests of the summer night. Are there any plants we could use to cut down on their numbers? - Andrea (via e-mail) A: First, get your pronunciation right - that's "crik," not "creek"! ("Creek" is what your shed door does.) And yes, there ARE plants that really CAN repel mosquitoes - but not the way you're probably thinking. Allow me to 'splain, Lucy, as I list 71/2 chemical-free ways to keep the skeeters from doing a Bela Lugosi all over your summertime tan . . . 1: Grow lemon balm.
FOOD
October 7, 1992 | by Polly Fisher, Special to the Daily News
Dear Polly: Cat-lovers often have a problem: They love their pets but hate what they do to furniture, walls and woodwork. To de-claw is painful and can be dangerous for the pet, since even house cats occasionally get out, get lost and run into trouble. (Without claws, a cat can neither defend itself against other cats nor climb a tree to safety.) We provide a scratching post, of course, and encourage our cats to use it, by praise and by rubbing catnip along it. Still, they occasionally slip.
NEWS
April 12, 1996 | by Theresa Conroy, Daily News Staff Writer
No ice cream, gelati or frozen yogurt for us. That's wimp stuff for unfortunates in Akron and Tulsa. Water ice is Philadelphia's warm-weather treat. It's a cold sweet that makes a vanilla custard cone look as pathetic as a bologna and cheese next to a mushroom cheesesteak with sauce and onions. And the city's water ice stands are finally open. South Philly guys in the 1930s first sold water ice - chipped ice laced with fruit juice - from pushcarts. These days machines mix the water, sugar and fruit, but tradition is still a major part of water ice culture.
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